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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Critics

Associated Archive Content : 190 results

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

Letter from Ben Carper to MLK

Ben Carper expresses his opinion in regards to Dr. King's position on Communism. Mr. Carper states that Dr. King is, "playing hand in glove with Godless Communists."

Letter from Ben Selsby to MLK

Ben Selsby writes Dr. King in support of his stand on the Vietnam War and answers the critics by increasing his SCLC contribution.

Letter from Bernard Edelman to MLK

Bernard Edelman, a former supporter of Dr. King and the SCLC, expresses his objection to Dr. King's stance on Vietnam.

Letter from Betty Doocy to MLK

Betty Doocy of Chicago, Illinois mildly criticizes Dr. King for leading marches in an effort to integrate neighborhoods in Chicago. She tells Dr. King of her experiences living in poverty as a non-Negro, and how her family has been able to survive and endure hardships. Doocy encourages Dr. King to instruct Negroes to properly take care of their living quarters and to be respectable in their job professions.

Letter from Boyd Burns to MLK

Boyd Burns criticizes Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War, equating it to the statements he hears from his white friends regarding the civil rights movement.

Letter from Bryce Nelson to MLK

Bryce Nelson, a SCLC contributor, writes Dr. King expressing that he shares the same views regarding the Vietnam War and commends Dr. King for asserting his beliefs.

Letter from C. B. Olmstead to MLK

Olmstead writes that he is unable to reconcile Dr. King's support of civil disobedience with his plans for peaceful demonstrations. He contends the purpose of King's sustained agitation is to provoke violence. He feels the Civil Rights Act of 1964 should become the mechanism for opposing discrimination, not further boycotts and sit-ins.

Letter from Carlos G. Randall to MLK

Carlos Randall writes Dr. King expressing that he once really liked him, but now he is unsure due to King's stance on Vietnam. He asserts "So now the USA is a purveyor of violence?" and asks if Dr. King believed that he would be able to give a similar speech in Moscow or Pekin and still freely receive his letter.

Letter from Carole A. Burnett to MLK

Mrs. Burnett informs Dr. King that her and her husband's financial support of the SCLC is suspended due to Dr. King's support of the Spring Mobilization and Vietnam Summer program. Though the Burnetts support the peace movement, they feel these two groups "present Hanoi's view of the Vietnam war."

Letter from Charles E. Rogers to MLK

Charles Rogers writes Dr. King expressing his grief because of King's recent "allegiance to the communist cause in Southeast Asia." Rogers states that because of Dr. King's speech, his fame will face a decline and people will ask, "who is Martin Luther King?"

Letter from Chas. W. Bailey to MLK

Chas. Bailey comments on representative Adam Clayton Powell, asserting that he cannot call himself a Christian and that he only escaped investigation because of his race. Bailey also lectures Dr. King for defending Powell.

Letter from Clara Horner to MLK

Clara Horner criticizes the methods of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes that instead of marching, Dr. King should work in higher education.

Letter from Clyde Rembert to MLK

Clyde Rembert, a broadcaster from KRLD-Radio and KRLD-TV, writes Dr. King inviting him to the radio show. Rembert seeks a response from Dr. King regarding a derogatory statement made by Dr. Criswell concerning King's anti-Vietnam war stance.

Letter from Concerned Citizen to MLK

A citizen writes Dr. King to express their disagreement and distaste for his work within the Civil Rights Movement. The citizen believes that Dr. King's work promotes more hatred and violence in the nation.

Letter from Contributor to MLK

The author offers support for the SCLC but is critical of Dr. King's interpretation of the term 'Black Power.' The author also suggests the formation of a third party candidate for the 1968 elections.

Letter from Dan H. Elkind to MLK

Mr. Elkind discusses recent actions of the SNCC and the SCLC's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign. He believes that the actions made by the SNCC will lead to violence and also "alienate" supporters of civil rights legislation. He views Dr. King's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign to be unlawful, and therefore suggests a different approach for Dr. King to take.

Letter from David P. Gaines to MLK

David P. Gaines criticizes Dr. King's tactics for instant integration.

Letter from Dr. Herzl Ragins to MLK

Dr. Herzl Ragins writes to Dr. King, denouncing him because of his support for Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from E. Rawley to MLK

E. Rawley writes Dr. King stating, "you are judged by the company you keep." Furthermore, Rawley asserts that King will end up a "nothing" when he is on the brink of fame and respect.

Letter from Eldredge Hiller to MLK

Mr. Eldredge, Executive Director of The American Association of Fund-Raising Counsel, writes Dr. King to express criticism of a statement made in an SCLC fact leaflet regarding "commercial fund raisers." Eldredge states that, while many people in his Association are usually sympathetic to Dr. King's views, the "distasteful" sentiment is exception.

Letter from Elmer A. Rovang to MLK

Elmer Rovang expresses disdain for Dr. King's views on foreign policy and space exploration. Rovang even threatens to vote for George Wallace as President in order to counter Dr. King's "destructive" ideology.

Letter from Eula Shaw to MLK

Calling Dr. King "The Trouble Maker of the United States," Mrs. Shaw criticizes Dr. King's methods in the Civil Rights Movement. She argues that a "campaign of love is in order" rather than demonstrations.

Letter from Eva Rosenfeld to MLK

Eva Rosenfeld writes Dr. King expressing her support of his stance on the Vietnam War, regardless of critics like the NAACP. She asserts that King's mentality is wise and "that hope for all of us lies in seeing these issues as one issue, an issue of our humanity."

Letter from George Y. Sodowick to MLK

George Sodowick expresses to Dr. King disapproval of the planned Poor Peoples Campaign of 1968. Sodowick suggests that, instead of occupying Washington, the demonstrators should settle in and enhance "riot torn cities."

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

Letter from Gulf Oil Corporation to MLK

Craig Thompson, Director of Public Relations, informs Dr. King of Gulf Oil's discontent regarding the confusion of objectives surrounding his role as a world peacemaker. He informs Dr. King that their continued support will be provided to other respected Negro organizations "devoting their energies to the fundamental issues of the Negro's place in America."

Letter from Harl Douglass to MLK and the SCLC

Harl Douglass writes in disgust at the position Dr. King has taken on Vietnam War. As a once full supporter of the civil rights movement, he believes that Dr. King "is somewhat unstable and he has made millions of enemies for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference....." Douglass warns Dr. King and SCLC officials that if they continue to go down the same track they will lose support of white moderates.

Letter from Henry Duerksen to MLK

Duerksen sends a brief letter showing his support and pride for Dr. King's work and dismissing negative statements toward Dr. King.

Letter from Hunn Guelde to MLK

Hunn Guelde inquires about a claim made by the FBI in regards to Dr. King.

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