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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Career in Ministry

Associated Archive Content : 186 results

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

R. Lennox, a principal at Presbyterian College in Montreal, Canada, invites Dr. King to speak on ministry at the college's 100th anniversary convocation address.

Letter from Rabbi Martin E. Katzenstein to MLK

Rabbi Martin Katzenstein writes Dr. King to express appreciation for Dr. King's participation in the worship service at Temple Israel in St. Louis, Missouri. He expresses the impact that Dr. King's address had on the congregation and the African American community in St. Louis. He encloses contributions from church service and a check to cover Dr. King's travel expenses.

Letter from Rev. Robert Hoggard of Grace Cathedral to Dora McDonald

Reverend Robert Hoggard, of Grace Cathderal in San Francisco, contacts Dora McDonald with the hope that Dr. King will be able to preach for their congregation on March 28, 1965.

Letter from Reverend A. S. Markham to MLK

Rev. Markham requests a response from Dr. King to an earlier letter. In the previous letter, Markham informed Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Shalom Synagogue would like to present an award to Dr. King.

Letter from Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. to MLK

Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. asks Dr. King and the Ebenezer Baptist Church for financial assistance to build his church.

Letter from Richard Dannenfelser to MLK

The acting chaplain of Ohio Wesleyan University inquires of Dr. King's availability to speak at their college during his trip to Columbus. Dr. King is scheduled to address the Ohio Council of Churches Pastors' Convention.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Vice President Richard M. Nixon expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's participation at the recent Religious Leaders Conference on Equal Job Opportunity. Nixon emphasizes the need for ongoing collaboration between local and national leaders to advance critical policy initiatives.

Letter from Roland Smith to MLK

Roland Smith requests that Dr. King prepare a list of themes for the Baptist Training Union. Smith encloses a copy of themes from the previous year for Dr. King to use as a template.

Letter from Ruth Wood to MLK

Ruth Wood of Virginia offers her gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. King for their efforts in search of a better society. Mrs. Wood also expresses her pleasure at attending Ebenezer Baptist Church and intends to attend the upcoming SCLC meeting.

Letter from Southern Junior High School to MLK

R. E. Lyles, Principal of Southern Junior High School in Columbus, Georgia, requests that Dr. King provide biographical information and a photograph for the Muscogee County School District's Annual Social Science Fair.

Letter from T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

T. K. Mahadevan writes Dr. King asking him to contribute to an article paying homage to the late Reverend A. J. Muste.

Letter from the Interseminary Movement's John Robert Nelson to MLK

J. Robert Nelson, National Chairman of the Interseminary Committee, invites Dr. King to be a part of their national conference with theological professors and students for the following year. He hopes that Dr. King will be the speaker on the subject of the Strategy of Churches and Ministers for Social Change.

Letter from The Norwegian Church to MLK and Friends

A member of the Norwegian Church extends congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize for 1964.

Letter from Theodore R. Britton Jr. to MLK

Theodore R. Britton promotes the candidacy of Dr. King for the pastorship of Riverside Church throughout this letter. Britton also asserts that New York is in need of Dr. King's leadership and sermons.

Letter from US Ambassador Findley Burns, Jr. to MLK

United States Ambassador Findley Burns writes Dr. King expressing his joy regarding King's upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Despite warnings due to Middle East conflict, Burns hopes that Dr. King will not cancel the trip. He sees the visit as an opportunity to strengthen the bonds between the US and Jordan.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy Regarding MLK Memorial Service

Dr. Abernathy receives this letter from an anonymous sender suggesting that the SCLC plan a memorial service in commemoration of Dr. King on Emancipation Day. The writer provides a list of music and poems that would be appropriate for the occasion.

Letter to MLK Regarding Merit Award

The author writes a letter that advocates for Dr. King to win an award of merit. In the letter, he discusses some major events that occurred throughout the Reverend's life. Some of these events include: leading the Civil Rights Movement, winning the Nobel Peace Prize, and becoming a strong political figure.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Loving Your Enemies

Dr. King's sermon "Love Your Enemies" is inspired by the life and message of Jesus Christ. According to the Bible, one must love not only those who love them, but also those who attempt to harm them. Dr. King is empathetic towards those who find it difficult to follow this practice, but regards it as necessary.

Loving Your Enemies

Dr. King interprets Jesus' command to "love your enemies" and outlines how to accomplish this goal. He closes this sermon by relating the philosophy of love to the use of nonviolence as a means to overcome oppression.

Making the Best of a Bad Mess

In this sermon, Dr. King discusses the letter Paul sent to Titus while he was in Crete. According to the letter, Crete was a terrible place for Christians, and Titus may have been confused as to why he was left there. Paul wrote to him saying that he left him there to make the situation better for the other people there. That is how one makes the best out of a bad mess.

Making the Best of A Bad Mess

This text of Dr. King's "Making the Best of a Bad Mess" sermon encourages the congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church to remain faithful in times of destitution. He makes clear the point that happiness is not found, but is instead created.

Man

Dr. King notes poet Algernon Charles Swinburne's ideology of man and his capabilities.

Man

Dr. King references two quotations on a note card titled "Man."

Mars Lecture Series

This 1958 program features Dr. King as guest lecturer for the Mars Lectures at Northwestern University.

Messianic Age (Haggai)

Dr. King makes reference to the Biblical governor Zerubbabel. The specific passage to which Dr. King refers reads, "On that day, says the Lord of Hosts, I will take you Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, my servant, and wear you like a signet ring; for it is you whom I have chosen. This is the word of the Lord of Hosts" (Hag. 2:23).

MLK Draft from Strength to Love: The Answer to a Perplexing Question

Here is a draft chapter from Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" in which Dr. King discusses that the casting out of evil in human lives requires "both man and God."

MLK Draft Notes: Worship

Dr. King preached this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist church on August 7, 1955. In this handwritten outline, Dr. King focuses on the practice of worship, claiming that it is an intrinsic part of human culture. After outlining a negative definition of worship, he approaches it from a "positive angle," describing a multitude of experiences he deems worshipful. Ultimately, he asserts that worship is useful on both a private and public level as it "helps us to transcend the hurly-burly of everyday life."

MLK Interview with Glenn E. Smiley

This early (1956) interview with Dr. King has as its center the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in Dr. King's career and the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Note Card - Schleiermacher, Theology and God-consciousness

The person to whom Dr. King is referring is the German philosopher Friedrich Schleiermacher.

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