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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Arrests

Associated Archive Content : 117 results

Letter from G. Merrill Lenox to MLK

G. Merrill Lenox, Executive Director for the Metropolitan Detroit Council of Churches, informs Dr. King he is being remembered and in the daily prayers of thousands during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from Hazel Jardine to MLK and CSK

Mrs. Hazel Jardine commends Dr. King on his efforts to obtain equality for all men.

Letter from Marion Barry and Edward B. King to MLK

Marion Barry and Edward B. King, Jr. extend their gratitude to Dr. King for his work, which has helped the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in its efforts.

Letter from Meir Weiss to MLK

Meir Weiss reports the facts that he has learned about Dr. King. He also requests an autographed picture and additional information about Dr. King's life.

Letter from MLK and Rev. Abernathy Regarding the Clergymen's Conference

Dr. King and Rev. Abernathy write to inform their readers of the tentative dates of the Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket. King and Abernathy mention that the dates of the conference need to be moved due to their impending jail sentence.

Letter from MLK to Coretta Scott King

In an intimate letter to Mrs. King, Dr. King informs her of his recent arrival to the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He urges her "to be strong in faith" as she is also pregnant with their third child at the time. He expresses his hope for a family visit that coming Sunday, and his desire to remain intellectually engaged during his four-month sentence.

Letter from MLK to James Hoffa

Dr. King offers support to James Hoffa, President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, several months prior to the start of Mr. Hoffa's prison term at Lewisburg Federal Penitentiary in Pennsylvania.

Letter from MLK to Joseph Gaulan

This is a letter from Dr. King to Joseph Gaulan to thank him for the letter of support while he was in the Birmingham jail.

Letter from Rev. John B. Morris to MLK

Rev. John B. Morris writes Dr. King while he is in the city jail in Atlanta, Georgia. Morris asserts that Dr. King's stay in jail will "renew strength to the student movement."

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

Letter From Walter J. Benedict to MLK

Mr. Walter Benedict writes to Dr. King expressing his sympathy for King's incarceration in Birmingham. Benedict plans to show support by fasting and praying during the several days King is in jail.

Letter from William Ryan to MLK

William Ryan, member of Congress writes Dr. King after he and other members of Congress were able to visit Selma. After witnessing the conditions at hand, they have been urged to break the barrier on the right to vote.

Letter of Support to MLK While In Jail

Silas Townsend wrote this letter to Dr. King upon his jailing in Birmingham in 1967. Townsend writes how appropriate it is that Dr. King is jailed on All Saints Day.

Letter to MLK Regarding Merit Award

The author writes a letter that advocates for Dr. King to win an award of merit. In the letter, he discusses some major events that occurred throughout the Reverend's life. Some of these events include: leading the Civil Rights Movement, winning the Nobel Peace Prize, and becoming a strong political figure.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

MLK Announces The Jail Sentences Stemming from the 1963 Birmingham Demonstrations

Dr. King makes this statement regarding the arrest of himself and other leaders of the 1963 Birmingham struggle. The Supreme Court in 1967 ruled that these leaders unjustly broke the city wide injunction banning demonstrations. Dr. King urges the nation, "Take heed. Do not allow the Bill of Rights to become a prisoner of war."

MLK Interview with Glenn E. Smiley

This early (1956) interview with Dr. King has as its center the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in Dr. King's career and the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Press Conference Birmingham, Alabama

This document contains dialogue during a press conference in Birmingham, Alabama. The reporters asks Dr. King questions regarding plans for the Soviet Union, Washington D.C., and the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Statement Regarding an Attack on the First Amendment

Dr. King addresses violations of First Amendment Rights in this statement regarding the events at Birmingham, Alabama in 1963.

MLK Statement Regarding the Non-Partisan Position of the SCLC

While keeping the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's position as a non-partisan organization, Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Senator Kennedy's concern for his arrest.

MLK Writes to Mrs. King from Jail

Dr. King writes this letter to Coretta Scott King after recently being transferred to a state prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He expresses understanding of how the present circumstances are difficult for his family, particularly given Coretta's pregnancy with their third child, Dexter Scott King. King goes on to encourage Coretta to maintain strength and says that their excessive suffering will serve the greater purpose of freedom. He asks her to come visit him and requests that she bring several books, a collection of sermons and a radio.

New York Times: The Case Against Tokenism

In this article for the New York Times, Dr. King writes of his experiences in an Albany, GA jail. Furthermore, he submits the idea that a delayed response to integration and equality for all is no longer acceptable due to the Negro having a "new sense of somebodiness."

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Order of Commitment

An Order of Commitment was issued for Dr. King on October 18, 1967 following a conviction for contempt of Court. The charge stemmed from a matter dating back to the 1963 Birmingham campaign. He was sentenced to five consecutive days in Jefferson County Jail, the famed location where "Letter from Birmingham Jail" was conceived.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

People In Action: The Complete Life

Dr. King was in jail in Birmingham and unable to contribute his regular column to the New York Amsterdam News. The editors published these excerpts from a sermon he had recently given at Riverside Church on "The Dimensions of a Complete Life."

Post Card from Jerry Smith to MLK

Jerry Smith writes to Dr. King who is in the Birmingham Jail. Smith accuses Dr. King of not being a genuine reverend, but a communist hate monger.

Salute to Martin Luther King, Jr.

This program for "Salute to Martin Luther King Jr." features a performance by the entertainer Sammy Davis, Jr. and an address by Dr. King.

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