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Human Rights

Associated Archive Content : 291 results

Letter from Mrs. Clara Bayles to MLK

Mrs. Bayles of Des Moines, Iowa writes Dr. King during his sentence in the Birmingham jail. She congratulates him for all of his achievements and reminisces on the events she has been privileged to attend and hear him speak publicly.

Letter from Mrs. Ernest Erber to MLK

Mrs. Erber tells Dr. King that she is sending the newspaper clipping featuring her daughter Elena. Elena raised eighty cents to fight the injustices of racism.

Letter from Mrs. R. K. Matthews to Mrs. King

This letter is from a middle class housewife who expressed her despair and frustration to Mrs. King in learning of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Murray Thomson to MLK

A representative of the Canadian Friends Service Committee, a subcommittee of The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in Canada, writes Dr. King to invite him to a "Conference for Diplomats." The sender tells Dr. King that the Conference will take place in Portland, Ontario, and emphasizes Human Rights Year. He asks Dr. King to consider being the keynote speaker for the event.

Letter from Nona Collins to MLK

Nona Collins, Legislative Chairman of the Germantown Branch of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dr. King in support of his stance on civil rights and the Vietnam War.

Letter from Philip E. Jones to MLK

Philip E. Jones, a SCOPE volunteer, recollects a "terrible night at Canton, Mississippi" where he met Dr. King and was assigned the duty to find Rev. Young. Jones invites Dr. King to speak about civil rights issues at Juniata College where he is enrolled.

Letter From Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler

Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler sends their support and best wishes to the S.C.L.C, C.O.R.E, and S.N.C.C for their efforts towards violence, Vietnam, and human dignity.

Letter from Rabbi Israel Miller to MLK

On the eighteenth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Rabbi Israel Miller, Chairman of the American Jewish Conference on Soviet Jewry, invites Dr. King to speak over a national telephone hook-up.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Ralph J. Bunche sends an invitation to Dr. King, asking him to join the International Sponsors Committee at the New School for Social Research in New York City. This committee was developed in honor of Norman Thomas, an advocate for human rights.

Letter from Raphael Gould to Coretta Scott King

Mr. Gould of the Fellowship of Reconciliation sends Mrs. King a compilation of writings about and by Phan Thi Mai, a Vietnamese student who self-immolated on May 16, 1967 in an appeal to end the war in Vietnam. Mai "decided to burn herself to make her voice heard by the war."

Letter from Resident of Dade County, Florida to MLK

An anonymous writer requests Dr. King's assistance for youth in the Juvenile Court System of Dade County, Florida.

Letter from Richard Bennett to MLK

Richard Bennett requests a letter of greeting from Dr. King to be read at the Minnesota Federation of Teachers Educational Conference.

Letter from Robert Birley to MLK

Robert Birley invites Dr. King to give an address at a program in London. Mr. Birley informs Dr. King of the four topics that will be discussed and requests that Dr. King address the topic of racial discrimination.

Letter from Robert G. Hardy of KMOX to Dora McDonald

KMOX radio in St. Louis, Missouri would like to have Dr. King on their program called "Sounding Board" for a question and answer session with listeners.

Letter from Robert Wacker to MLK

Robert Wacker is highly distressed about housing discrimination in his neighborhood. In this letter to Dr. King, Wacker displays his determination towards eradicating segregated communities and encourages Dr. King to rally around this issue.

Letter from Rosetta Ritz to MLK

Rosetta Ritz expresses admiration and gratitude to Dr. King for his selfless efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Ms. Ritz hopes Dr. King will find time to visit with "economically deprived" children in the Chicago area.

Letter from Ruth Olsen to Dora McDonald

Ruth Olsen of St. Ansgar's Lutheran Church writes Dora McDonald requesting 30 copies of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Saifuddin Ahmed to MLK

Saifuddin Ahmed writes on behalf of the East Pakistan Student Union inviting Dr. King to speak at their 10th Provincial Conference. The students also express their admiration for Dr. King's dedication and leadership to human rights worldwide.

Letter from Sanford Kahn to MLK

Sanford Kahn requests Dr. King's support for an effort to abolish the death penalty at the federal level. If given Dr. King's support, Kahn proposes listing the SCLC as a participating member of the ad hoc committee. If the SCLC cannot be listed, Kahn suggests Dr. King serve as an advisor.

Letter from Students of Southern Africa to MLK

Students from South Africa write Dr. King to express their concerns regarding the United States' diplomatic relations with the Republic of South Africa.

Letter from Sy Sadinoff to MLK

After speaking to Jackie Robinson and asking him how Beacon Looms, Inc. can best help the movement for Negro equality, Sy Sadinoff writes to Dr. King enclosing a $100 donation for the Mount Olive Building Fund.

Letter from Sylvester Webb to MLK

Sylvester Webb, Sponsor of the Sixth Grade Graduating Class Gift for Edward Gideon Public School in Philidelphia, informs Dr. King that an oil portrait of him was commissioned by sixth grade class. Webb request King's appearance or one of his advisers for the ceremony to place the portrait in the school lobby. Dr. King would later send Reverend Walter Fauntroy of the SCLC's Washington bureau to represent him.

Letter from the Holy Name College to MLK

The Holy Name College requests Dr. King's written contribution for a new section in their publication entitled Interest Magazine. Interest Magazine is an international publication dedicated to the understanding and appreciation of theology. Dr. King has been selected to focus on the issue regarding Christianity and the American Negro. The college provides Dr. King with the restrictions of his essay and assures him that they will print his written work without editing for authenticity.

Letter from the KKK Kids to MLK

An anonymous member of The K.K.K. Kids writes Dr. King expressing that he or she believes Dr. King to be "a very ignorant person."

Letter from the National Union of South African Students to MLK

On behalf of the National Union of South African Students at the University of Cape Town and the University Van Kaapstad, Martin West requests Dr. King's contribution concerning race relations to the Nusas Journal. The scholarly journal is the "only real national" organ available to students regardless of "race, religion, or colour" in apartheid South Africa.

Letter from The Norwegian Church to MLK and Friends

A member of the Norwegian Church extends congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize for 1964.

Letter from the United Nations Associations in Canada to MLK

The United Nations Association in Canada informs Dr. King of Human Rights Day that is celebrated and their hope to have him as a speaker. It is the association's interest to have Dr. King speak to bring a greater level of consciousness to the global community.

Letter from the United Nations to MLK

Robin Skuce, Education Secretary of the United Nations Association in Canada, writes Dr. King inquiring of his availability to lecture at a seminar for high school students at their New York headquarters.

Letter from Vernal G. Cave to MLK

Vernal G. Cave informs Dr. King of a cousin's passing and contributes to the SCLC in his memory.

Letter from Vivian C. Kelley to MLK and President Kennedy

Vivian C. Kelley offers her support to Dr. King in his continued efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Mrs. Kelley shares with Dr. King a letter in which she asks President John F. Kennedy to address issues of discrimination in the United States. In response to Mrs. Kelly, Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, expresses thanks on the behalf of President John F. Kennedy and assures Mrs. Kelley the President and the Administration are dedicated to ending discrimination and securing the Constitutional Rights of all Americans.

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