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Ethics

Associated Archive Content : 145 results

Letter from John A. McDermott to Chicago Daily News

John McDermott anticipates discrimination in housing and job opportunities as a result of a proposed federal project for a nuclear power plant in Illinois. Ideally, The Weston Project should create equal opportunities for both black and white Americans. McDermott expresses concern considering the current conditions of racial injustice that exists in Illinois.

Letter from John to MLK

John discusses some points on religious ethics with Dr. King and offers gratitude for a Labor Day dinner with the King family.

Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

Letter from M. Strawder to MLK

M. Strawder welcomes Dr. King to the Chicago community while informing him of the current social struggles that they are faced with.

Letter from MLK

Dr. King thanks the supporters of the "Martin Luther King Fund" for their integral role in the effort to end poverty and discrimination.

Letter from MLK to D. Martin Fischer about American People

Dr. King thanks Prof. Fischer for "submitting [his] thoughts and words of warning for the American People." Dr. King agrees with the professor's assertion that we should all try to "avoid the excesses and horrors of war."

Letter from MLK to Jimmy Edward

Dr. King acknowledges receipt of Mr. Jimmy Edwards' letter with the kind words concerning his book, "Strength To Love."

Letter from MLK to Mary M. Drummond

Dr. King thanks Ms. Drummond for her supportive correspondence regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail." He states that the opportunity to fight racial injustice is a "rare privilege" and regards his open letter as an attempt to examine racial inequity under the lens of Christian ethics.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Hassell

Dr. King addresses Mrs. Hassell's questions regarding Pope Paul's quest for peace.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson

Dr. King requests government assistance for the impoverished communities of the Mississippi Delta. He then provides a course of action to improve the standard of living within those communities.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Earl C. Scott

Dr. King writes Reverend Earl C. Scott expressing appreciation for his words of encouragement and providing Reverend Scott with information regarding his current work towards social justice.

Letter from MLK to Sara B. Jackson

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mrs. Jackson for her moral and financial support.

Letter from Mr. Levison Regarding U.S. Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Mr. Levison expresses his support for Representative Powell during the controversial House of Representatives committee chairmanship and ethical dilemma. Levison goes on to defend the suggestion of race being the determining factor of his criticism by volunteering his support of any review of congressional systems.

Letter from Mrs. Edward G. Rolfe to MLK

The wife of a wrongfully accused man, Edward G. Rolfe, pleads for Dr. King to hear her story of discrimination.

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

Letter from Paul Verghese to MLK

Father Verghese requests Dr. King provide a written statement regarding what spiritual resources he draws upon, to cope with the constant threat from elements of American Society, and how he uses this as a basis for his position on nonviolence.

Letter from Rev. O. L. Westley to Local Board

In this undated letter, Rev. Westley writes to the "Local Board" on the behalf of Mr. Stanley Howard, who is claiming status as a conscientious objector after being called to serve "in the Armed Service" [sic].

Letter from Robert Sandberg from MLK

Robert Sandberg criticizes Dr. King for his recent statements on the Vietnam War. Mr. Sandberg states that Dr. King's position has now undermined his effectiveness as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from William Rutherford to MLK

William Rutherford expresses his enthusiasm for being a new addition to Dr. King's team. Rutherford also encloses newspaper clipping on the Pacem in Terris meetings.

Letter to Dr. King from Elder G.W. Watkins

Elder G. W. Watkins writes Dr. King requesting that he and his organization join the fight to regain Cassius Clay's (Muhammad Ali) title as the Heavy Weight Boxing Champion of the World.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Loving Your Enemies

Dr. King's sermon "Love Your Enemies" is inspired by the life and message of Jesus Christ. According to the Bible, one must love not only those who love them, but also those who attempt to harm them. Dr. King is empathetic towards those who find it difficult to follow this practice, but regards it as necessary.

Man

Dr. King quotes T. E. Hulme's publication Speculation regarding the nature of man.

Mastering Our Fears

Dr. King discusses fear, the healthy and unhealthy fears humanity has, the need to overcome fear, and steps in mastering fear.

Memorandum from MLK

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

Metaphysics

Dr. King quotes from F. H. Bradley's "Appearance and Reality."

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

MLK Debuts the Book of the Year

This "Christian Century" ad debuts Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

MLK Note

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.

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