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Discrimination in Employment

Associated Archive Content : 283 results

Letter from Richard Boone Enclosing CCAP Statement

This letter from the Executive Director of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty encloses a statement regarding the 1966 Amendments made to the Economic Opportunity Act.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Vice President Richard M. Nixon expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's participation at the recent Religious Leaders Conference on Equal Job Opportunity. Nixon emphasizes the need for ongoing collaboration between local and national leaders to advance critical policy initiatives.

Letter from Robert Carter and D. John Heyman to MLK

The National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing (NCDH) sends Dr. King a report, which examined "where the jobs are and where those who need them most now live." According to the NCDH, the study shows that jobs are not in the same geographic area where Negroes and other minorities live.

Letter from Robert E. Harding, Thomas H. Weddington and Celestine B. Bailey to MLK

Robert E. Harding Jr., Thomas H. Weddington, and Celestine B. Bailey detail the many allegations of racial discrimination involving employees from the National Labor Relations Board. These issues have conflicted with the Equal Employment Opportunity and the Civil Service Rules and Regulations. Harding, Weddington, and Bailey request Dr. King's assistance to correct this issue.

Letter from Robert Lee Hill to MLK

Robert Lee Hill writes to inform Dr. King of the discrimination taking place in the United States Post Office. He then requests the help of the Reverend to put an end to it.

Letter from Samuel Merrick to Robert Kennedy

U.S. Department of Labor representative Samuel V. Merrick reports the details of a Texas racial discrimination case to Senator Robert F. Kennedy.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Lyndon B. Johnson invites Dr. King to a conference to hear a progress report on the work of the President's Committee for Equal Employment.

Letter from Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission to MLK

In an effort to reduce the number of school dropouts, Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission requests to include Dr. King in their upcoming brochure. Ducey asks to include Dr. King's photograph and a quotation from a speech he delivered at Chicago's Soldier Field which highlighted academic achievement as a necessity.

Letter from Wayne Williams to Virgil D. Jones

In this letter, Wayne Williams, Director of Field Activities at Fair Employment Practices Commission in Illinois, informs Virgil Jones that they have investigated his charge with the Commission and now want to review the information over with him.

Letter from Wayne Williams to Virgil Jones

Wayne Williams writes to follow up with Virgil Dwight Jones on his recently filed charge with the Chicago Fair Employment Practices Commision Office.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Letter from William W. Boyer to MLK

This Letter from William W. Boyer, Chairman of the Convocations Committee, to Dr. King informs Dr. King the transcription of his "Future of Integration" speech to the Kansas State University academic community has arrived. A copy of the transcription will be published in Issues 1968.
This enclosed transcription of his speech addresses many varied issues affecting American society.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addressed multiple issues that they had a misunderstanding about. He then tells Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions. Lastly, he informs Attorney General Cook that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Letter to Clark, Dodge and Company from MLK

Here is a letter from Dr. King to anonymous donor through Clark, Dodge and Company acknowledging the receipt of stock shares to the SCLC. Dr. King goes on to elaborate on how this contribution will directly impact the efforts of SCLC.

Letter to Franklin D. Roosevelt Regarding Discrimination In Employment

In this letter, Fred Poellnitz writes Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding his inability to obtain a job with the U.S. government. He claims that it is due to discrimination in employment.

Letter to MLK from Angry Citizen of Detroit

A bothered citizen of Detroit writes Dr. King, who is referred to as the "negro champion," to express personal views on the status of the Negroes in the city.

Letter to Mr. R.C. Firestone

An unknown author writes to Mr. R. C. Firestone stating how delightful it is to hear that the Firestone Company plans to build a new plant in Albany, Ga.

Looking Forward: The Montgomery Improvement Association, Inc.

This pamphlet outlines the ten points the Montgomery Improvement Association uses to promote healthy race relations.

Man's Struggle for Freedom

The "Chicago Tribune" reviews Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Pamphlet

This pamphlet promotes the historic March on Washington of August 28, 1963. The pamphlet calls upon Congress to pass civil rights legislation and end the "twin evils of discrimination and economic deprivation" that plague the nation.

March to Washington Strategic Planning

This document outlines key strategies concerning the upcoming March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963. The one-day civil rights demonstration intends to bring national attention to the social and economic injustices afflicting millions of American citizens.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Memorandum from MLK

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

Memorandum from Stanley Levison Regarding Congressman Powell

This memorandum from Mr. Levison concerns legal issues regarding Congressman Adam Clayton Powell. His position is that those issues, valid or not, need examination in the overall context of "the real issue...the undemocratic nature of the congressional system."

MKL At Zoin Hill - "The Ballot"

This transcript of a passionate, poetic, and inspiring speech touches on many of King's motifs. It starts with an appeal for voting rights, addresses the despair the audience feels from time to time, and ends with a refrain of "we shall overcome."

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

MLK Address to District 65 of the AFL-CIO

Dr. King addresses District 65 of the AFL-CIO in Monticello, New York. He begins by expressing his appreciation to the AFL-CIO for their generous contributions to the Civil Rights Movement. He discusses the impact of the Albany Movement and segregation in the South. Dr. King makes the point that America refers to itself as a world leader, yet we are significantly behind other countries in social and welfare legislation.

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