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Associated Archive Content : 152 results

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Thomas Johnson, a reporter for the New York Times, writes to Dr. King requesting his participation in a symposium to be published in Playboy, regarding the civil rights movement.

Letter from Thomas R. Hughes to MLK

Thomas R. Hughes, Executive Assistant to the Secretary of Agriculture, sends Dr. King Orville Freeman's Senate testimony on the Department's efforts to improve nutrition for low-income families and provide food assistance throughout the country.

Letter from Wilfred Laurier Husband to John B. Oakes of the New York Times

Wilfred Husband writes John Oakes, Editorial Page Editor of the New York Times, regarding an article. As a consistent reader of the Magazine, Husband expresses his displeasure with an article that refers to the civil right movement's attention to the war in Vietnam as "wasteful and self-defeating." Husband explains how war and civil rights are inseparable and that stating anything in opposition hurts the cause of the movement.

Letter from William Rutherford to MLK

William Rutherford expresses his enthusiasm for being a new addition to Dr. King's team. Rutherford also encloses newspaper clipping on the Pacem in Terris meetings.

Letter Regarding the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition

A letter drafted by Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph, co-Chairmen of the Urban Coalition. includes article clippings from various newspapers discussing the dire need for public service employment, private employment, educational disparities, reconstruction and urban development, and equal housing opportunities.

Letter to MLK from the Lutheran Standard Regarding Publishing

In this letter, George H. Muedeking, the editor of The Lutheran Standard, inquires if his publication can publish an advertisement of Dr. King's that was in The New York Times.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

List of Messages to MLK

A list of messages including names, dates, and organizations intended for Dr. King, soliciting his response.

Martin Luther King Does It Again

Ralph C. Bailey, a marcher in the New York City demonstration against the War in Vietnam, describes the demonstration as an "impressive spectacle" of people of all ages and races. He praises Dr. King for combining revolution with nonviolence in hopes of a peaceful demonstration.

Mastering Ourselves

"Mastering Ourselves" is Dr. King's exploration of the inner struggle for good and evil that occurs within every human's experience. Dr. King asserts that this "dualism" can sometimes cause good people to do bad things and bad people to do good things. According to Dr. King, this can only be overcome through identifying and replacing one's own weaknesses. He also suggests finding a profitable way to use leisure time coupled with a devotional life and continuous prayer.

Meet the Press

This transcript of a special 90-minute edition of NBC’s Meet the Press features Dr. King and other prominent Negro civil rights leaders discussing the topics of war, nonviolence, integration, unemployment and black power. The program was aired on radio and television.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

MLK and New York Protest Meeting Speakers

The SCLC releases a statement to the media regarding Dr. King and other Southern leaders trip to New York to address a series of mass protest meetings. This document outlines a schedule of meetings and also announces that Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. and Actor Harry Belafonte will join the protest.

MLK Cited in Damage Suit

The New York Times reports that Dr. King is one of the defendants in a $15 Million law suit.

MLK on the New York Riots

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.

MLK Sermon: Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Dr. King gives a sermon on why he does not support the war in Vietnam.

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

MLK Statement about the New York Riots

Dr. Kind addresses the press' claim that civil rights leaders are involved in the outbreak of riots in New York. He says that violence creates more social problems than it solves. He says that government officials need to take responsibility and help all American citizens gain justice and equality.

MLK Supports New York City Teachers

Dr. King sends telegram of support to the United Federation of Teachers backing them in their efforts to create better conditions to work and educate students.

Mobilizer: February 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Negotiation Now New York Times Advertisement

Negotiation Now, a national pro-American group opposing the war in Vietnam, planned to publish this article as an advertisement in the New York Times. Clark Herr, Reverend John J. Dougherty, Dr. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and Seymour Martin Lipset send this letter, along with an enclosed draft of the piece, explaining that its publishing has been delayed so it can be updated in the ever changing circumstances in Vietnam. The article addresses the concerns of the movement and urges people to call their representatives.

New Harassment: The Lunacy Test by MLK

Dr. King identifies events that demonstrate the absurd actions of the racist opposition during the Freedom Movement in the South.

New York Times Graphic: Minority Problems in White Collar Employment

This graphic from The New York Times shows examples of demographic inequality in white collar jobs.

New York Times: US Judge Forbids A House Inquiry; Panel is Defiant

This article discusses the decision of a federal judge, ordering the House Committes of Un-American Activities to not hold a hearing on a bill that would make it illegal for Americans to aid the Vietcong.

Newspaper Article-New York TImes

This newspaper clipping is dated from the June 18, 1964 edition of the New York Times. In this article, Dr. King's new book entitled, "Why We Can't Wait" is advertised as "required reading."

Newspaper Clippings on Vietnam, January 1968

This document is a collage of newspaper clippings from the New York Time and the Washington Post on union leaders' positions on Vietnam. The boxed quotation is excerpted from a recent AFL-CIO convention.

NYT Advertisement for Where Do We Go from Here?

This document is a New York Times advertisement for Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The title of the ad offers the synopsis: "Martin Luther King, Jr. offers a hard-headed program for what we do next."

Oberlin College Commencement

This issue of the Oberlin Alumni Magazine features commencement articles and photos as well as Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution, Dr. King’s address to the graduating class.

Permission to Include King's New York Times Article in College Textbook

Phillip O. Foss, Chairman of the Political Science Department of Colorado State University, seeks Dr. King's permission to include his article "Civil Right No. 1 - The Right to Vote" in a college textbook. Foss is preparing the textbook "Major Issues of Our Time", to be published by Wadsworth Publishing Company.

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