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Civil Rights Act, 1964

Associated Archive Content : 227 results

Letter from MLK to Thomas J. Dodd

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Thomas J. Dodd's support in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Vance Hartke Regarding Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Vance Hartke's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Wallace F. Bennett

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Wallace F. Bennett, a United States Senator from Utah, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to William Proxmire

Dr. King thanks William Proxmire for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Nathan Watts to MLK

Mr. Watts asks Dr. King to call off the March on Washington because of the political backlash he foresees. He predicts the march will harm the civil rights bill that is being discussed in Congress., which would later be passed as the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Nicholas Katzenbach to MLK

U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach writes to Dr. King acknowledging his suggestion of using the Greenville Air Force Base to help alleviate the economic problems of Negro families in the Mississippi Delta. Katzenbach states that most of the land is no longer leased by the U.S. government but that Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1965 would apply to any educational programs.

Letter from Paul H. Douglas to MLK

Paul H. Douglass extends his gratitude to Dr. King, Roy Wilkins and their followers for the "passage of the Civil Rights Bill."

Letter from Postal Worker to MLK

An anonymous postal worker requests that Dr. King write a letter to the regional director of the Atlanta Post Office concerning discriminatory employment practices.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy and MLK to Howard W. Creecy

Dr. King and Ralph Abernathy inform Reverend Creecy they will be serving a five day jail sentence for breaking an injunction against demonstrating in Birmingham, Alabama. It is for this reason that the Clergymen's Conference will have to be moved to a later date.

Letter from Representative Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Representative Weltner disagrees with Dr. King's assessment that Weltner's decision to seat the regular Mississippi delegation "was a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." Weltner also reminds Dr. King that he voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from S. Scott to MLK

S. Scott states how he objects to Dr. King's leadership because he believes that Dr. King's influence has resulted in lawless riots. Mr. Scott suggests alternatives for those who live in the "slums" and identifies education as a means of advancement. Furthermore, Mr. Scott assures results from the Civil Rights Bill in time.

Letter from Samuel Merrick to Robert Kennedy

U.S. Department of Labor representative Samuel V. Merrick reports the details of a Texas racial discrimination case to Senator Robert F. Kennedy.

Letter from Senator Birch Bayh to MLK

Indiana Senator Birch Bayh thanks Dr. King for his note supporting Bayh's vote in favor of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Bayh also thanks Dr. King for his concern regarding Bayh and his wife's recent accident. He includes a handwritten postscript in which he mentions the hope of meeting Dr. King in person.

Letter from Senator Edward V. Long to MLK

Senator Edward V. Long (D-Missouri) writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter concerning Long's support of the civil rights bill.

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

Letter from Senator Hugh Scott to MLK

US Senator Hugh Scott, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for the Reverend's letter of recent date. In addition, Scott reveals that he sponsored the Civil Rights legislation long before the present act was introduced. Scott also expresses that he would enjoy speaking with Dr. King during his next visit in Washington, D. C.

Letter from Senator Thomas H. Kuchel to MLK

California Republican Senator Thomas H. Kuchel writes Dr. King thanking him his letter celebrating the recent passage in the Senate of the Civil Rights bill.

Letter from Senator William Proxmire to MLK

US Senator William Proxmire writes Dr. King expressing gratitude for the Reverend's previous letter regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Stanley Newman to MLK Regarding National Coalition for a New Congress

Newman writes that, given the recent passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Bill, a national coalition needs to be created to support and enforce it. Understanding the limitations of Congress, the new coalition would focus on transforming Congress to better support the needs of the underprivileged and oppressed.

Letter from Tony Edwards to MLK

Fourteen-year-old Tony Edwards writes Dr. King to ask for an autograph to add to his collection. He also thanks Dr. King "for making the Civil Rights Bill possible."

Letter from Virginia Madden to Mrs. King

Virginia Madden, a 91-year-old white woman from Philadelphia, writes to congratulate Mrs. King on Dr. King's winning the Nobel Peace Prize. She says she has deplored racism and welcomes the new Civil Rights Law.

Letter from Vivian C. Kelley to MLK and President Kennedy

Vivian C. Kelley offers her support to Dr. King in his continued efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Mrs. Kelley shares with Dr. King a letter in which she asks President John F. Kennedy to address issues of discrimination in the United States. In response to Mrs. Kelly, Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, expresses thanks on the behalf of President John F. Kennedy and assures Mrs. Kelley the President and the Administration are dedicated to ending discrimination and securing the Constitutional Rights of all Americans.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addressed multiple issues that they had a misunderstanding about. He then tells Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions. Lastly, he informs Attorney General Cook that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Letter to Hubert M. Humphrey from MLK

Dr. King writes Hubert M. Humphrey to praise his "matchless, exhaustive and courageous leadership" in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964. For his effort, Dr. King tells Congressman Humphrey that he has earned the "sincere gratitude" of the international community.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to MLK and Others Regarding Article

Tom Offenburger sends Dr. King a copy of a newspaper clipping from the Atlanta Constitution in which the writer Bruce Galphin expresses his sentiments regarding the often violent occurrences at nonviolent protests.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Memorandum from Dr. King

Dr. King addresses this memorandum to the organizers of a "Stall In" at the World's Fair. He advises against the demonstration and only advises it when "persistent attempts at good faith negotiations have completely failed."

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

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