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Civil Rights Act, 1964

Associated Archive Content : 227 results

Letter from Frank Thompson Jr. to MLK

New Jersey Democratic Congressman Frank Thompson thanks Dr. King for his message regarding the Congressman's part in the fight for civil rights. Thompson mentions that he considers Dr. King to be one of the "great leaders" of their generation.

Letter from Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Wisconsin Democratic Senator Gaylord Nelson writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for his kind letter regarding the passage of the Civil Rights Act. Senator Nelson reports that many of his constituents were solidly in favor of the bill.

Letter from George E. Riddick to MLK

Mr. Riddick writes to Dr. King and thanks him for speaking at Soldier Field. He expresses the support of the Illinois community for Dr. King's ministry on behalf of Civil Rights.

Letter from Gordon Allott to MLK

Gordon Alliot, a member of the United States Senate, sends his appreciation to Dr. King for his endorsement for a position on the "historic civil rights bill."

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Letter from James Hamilton and Frank Pohlhaus

James Hamilton and Francis Pohlhaus offer the Leadership Conference Executive Committee a list of recommendations on school desegregation. They also provide information on reasons why goals toward equal education have not been progressing as needed.

Letter from Joe C. Sullivan to MLK

Mr. Sullivan assures Dr. King of his and his wife's support for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Sullivan, a white Baptist, also expresses discontent over the number of prejudiced people within his race and faith.

Letter from John A. McDermott to Chicago Daily News

John McDermott anticipates discrimination in housing and job opportunities as a result of a proposed federal project for a nuclear power plant in Illinois. Ideally, The Weston Project should create equal opportunities for both black and white Americans. McDermott expresses concern considering the current conditions of racial injustice that exists in Illinois.

Letter from John and Enid Howarth to Friends Soliciting Financial Support

Mr. and Mrs. Howarth of New Mexico express their disapproval of violence against Negroes in the South and request donations for a Fourth of July celebration in support of SCLC, SNCC and other civil rights groups.

Letter from John Huston to MLK

Reverend John Huston of the East View United Church of Christ writes to Dr. King to express his appreciation for Operation Breadbasket. Huston calls this the most effective civil rights initiative he's ever had the pleasure of working on. He brings up three points that he would like to discuss with Dr. King, including how to better advocate for the Negroes' federally guaranteed rights.

Letter from John W. McCormack to MLK

John McCormack writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his telegram of commendation "in relation to the passage of the Civil Rights Bill in the House of Representatives." McCormack expresses that he hopes he will have the pleasure of seeing Dr. King again.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Senator Joseph S. Clark informs Dr. King of the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's support.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Senator Kenneth B. Keating responds to Dr. King's previous message by providing him with a copy of a statement he delivered before the Senate passed the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Luther Hodges to MLK Regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964

The U.S. Secretary of Commerce, Luther Hodges, sent this letter to Dr. King on the eve of the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He writes that he, King, and President Johnson share enthusiasm over the bill and are positive for the future of America. Hodges asks for Dr. King's continued aid in leading the nation to comply with the bill and, in the words of President Johnson, "eliminate the final strongholds of intolerance and hatred."

Letter from MLK and Rev. Abernathy Regarding the Clergymen's Conference

Dr. King and Rev. Abernathy write to inform their readers of the tentative dates of the Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket. King and Abernathy mention that the dates of the conference need to be moved due to their impending jail sentence.

Letter from MLK Requesting Support

Dr. King sent this letter soliciting donations for the SCLC following the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He says there is gratifying compliance with desegregation in some areas and renewed defiance elsewhere. ?Responsibility is as important as militancy,? King writes, in challenging segregation and discrimination. The SCLC pledges both.

Letter from MLK to Alan Bible

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Alan Bible, a United States Senator from Nevada, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Dr. King describes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy's efforts as "courageous" and "effective" in guiding Congress to establish the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Dr. King writes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to commend him for his courage and work in directing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through Congress.

Letter from MLK to Birch Bayh

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Birch Bayh's support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In addition, Dr. King prays for Mr. Bayh's recovery from his recent accident.

Letter from MLK to Bruce Smith

Dr. King responds to Mr. Smith's earlier letter, in which Smith objected to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dr. King recommends his book, "Why We Can't Wait" to Smith and offers his response to Smith's argument against the bill.

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

Letter from MLK to Carl Hayden

Dr. King addresses Carl Hayden to commend him on the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Clair Engle

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Clair Engle's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Clifford P. Case

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Clifford Case, a United States Senator from New Jersey, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Daniel K. Inouye

Dr. King commends Hawaiian Senator Daniel K. Inouye for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Ernest Gruening

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Ernest Gruening, a United States Senator from Alaska, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Frank Carlson

Dr. King writes Kansas Senator Frank Carlson to applaud his vote for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Frank Church

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Frank Church, a United States Senator from Idaho, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Gaylord Nelson

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Gaylord Nelson, a United States Senator from Wisconsin, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

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