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Civil rights

Associated Archive Content : 418 results

Letter from Bryce Nelson to MLK

Bryce Nelson, a SCLC contributor, writes Dr. King expressing that he shares the same views regarding the Vietnam War and commends Dr. King for asserting his beliefs.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK Regarding Paul Chapman

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in reference to a previous telgram correspondence concerning an assault on Reverend Paul Chapman. Burke writes that his department can take no action due to a lack of evidence indicating a crime.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the US Department of Justice to MLK

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall responds to a telegram from Dr. King requesting an investigation regarding conditions at the Mitchell County, Georgia Jail. Marshall points out that his department has no juridiction in the absence of any federal violations, but he assures the Reverend that he will examine any information sent by Dr. King.

Letter from Byron L. Johnson to MLK

Byron L. Johnson questions the accountability and lack of trust within the House of Representatives. Furthermore, Mr. Johnson suggest the House of Representatives create a new code of ethics, observe due process of law, and ensure the financial validity of all candidates.

Letter from Charles Armstrong to Robert Ruper

Charles Armstrong, Publisher & Editor of the South Suburban News, writes to the Executive Vice President and CEO of Phillip Morris, Robert Ruper. In response to lack of funding provided to black communities, Dr. King, Jesse Jackson, and other leaders spark a nationwide boycott, Operation Breadbasket. Mr. Armstrong urges Mr. Ruper to comply with recent demands concerning acts discrimination within Phillip Morris.

Letter from Charles Sherrod to Friends of SNCC

Field Secretary Charles Sherrod invites friends of the SNCC to an emergency meeting to outline the direction of the student and Civil Rights Movement. The meeting is to be held at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee which serves as a training ground for nonviolence and civil rights activities.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

Letter from Charles Woodall to MLK

Charles Woodall, representing the All Souls Unitarian Church of Santa Cruz, California, congratulates Dr. King on his efforts in the fight for freedom. Woodall explains that he is a Georgia native that once lived in Selma, Alabama in the early 1900's. At the time of this letter the SCLC and SNCC were in the middle of a massive Negro voter registration campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Clara Sturges Johnson to MLK

Ms. Johnson informs Dr. King of her efforts promoting the passing of the "Kennedy Civil Rights Memorial Act." The United States Congress would go on to pass this act in 1964.

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

Letter from Claudia Harris to MLK

Claudia Harris informs Dr. King that Dana College is participating in "Choice 68." She also requests material on Dr. King's position regarding the Vietnam War, civil rights, the urban crisis and the federal budget.

Letter from Congressman Edward R. Roybal to MLK

California Congressman Roybal responds to a message from Dr. King regarding the seating of the Mississippi delegation. Roybal reminds Dr. King of his record on matters related to civil rights.

Letter from Congressman Herman Toll to MLK

Pennsylvania Democratic Congressman Herman Toll thanks Dr. King for his letter and assures Dr. King that he will continue to seek strong civil rights legislation.

Letter from Constance A. Price to Peter H. Dominick

Constance Price addresses grievances and complaints related to human rights. She demands appropriate and necessary congressional actions.

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Letter from Cryssana Jenkins Bogner to MLK

Mrs. Cryssana Jenkins Bogner writes Dr. King with to both support his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, and to share her discontent with Executive Director of the NAACP Roy Wilkin's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from David Sutton to MLK

The associate director of Alumni Relations at Drexel Institute of Technology invites Dr. King to speak at the newly formed Downtown Luncheon Club. Mr. Sutton mentions that the alumni of Drexel revere Dr. King's philosophy and principles of nonviolence. He also informs Dr. King about the confirmed attendance of Pulitzer Prize winner James Michener.

Letter from Debby Hopper to MLK

Debby Hopper, a 17-year-old from the Boston area, writes Dr. King to discuss prejudice in America and relates what she believes to be the hypocrisy of whites in her community. She also offers Dr. King words of encouragement in his fight for civil rights.

Letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to MLK

This is a letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to Dr. King inviting him to be the keynote speaker at a Jewish Seminar on Negro-Jewish relationships.

Letter from Donna Mitchell to MLK

Donna Mitchell, an African American youth from Detroit, writes Dr. King to extend her support and express her appreciation for what he and others are doing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Berl Bernhard

Dora McDonald informs Berl Bernhard that Dr. King has a prior engagement out of the country and cannot attend the civil rights planning conference. McDonald states, "He asked me to say to you that he would be grateful if you would send him a copy of the report of the conference."

Letter from Dora McDonald to K. Natwar Singh

Enclosed is an article that was originally sent to Mr. K. Natwar Singh from Dr. King. The article discusses Jawaharial Nehru and his fight for peace. In the article, Dr. King expresses the importance of Nehru's beliefs to the United States.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Alfred T. Davies

Dora McDonald informs Rev. Alfred T. Davies that Dr. King will not be able to submit a sermon for "The Church Speaks on Race." Dr. King has just published "Strength to Love," which includes his sermons on many of the aspects of the civil rights movement.

Letter From Dora McDonald to Sarah Harvey

Ms. McDonald thanks Mrs. Harvey for her contribution to the SCLC, and informs her that Dr. King will contact her on his return from Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Douglas Straton to MLK

Douglas Straton, Chairman of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Oregon, invites Dr. King to participate in their Distinguished Visiting Lectureship Program. The department would appreciate Dr. King's presentation of three lectures and attendance at a breakfast meeting with the town clergy. They offer him a $500 honorarium and request that he consider coming the following school year.

Letter from Dr. J. H. Young to MLK

Dr. J. H. Young writes this letter to Dr. King about slavery, the Civil War, and President Lincoln. He reminds Dr. King that the Civil War was fought not over slavery, but succession.

Letter from Dr. Nickolas W. Dick to MLK

Dr. King expresses regret to Dr. Dick regarding his inability to participate in a series of meetings sponsored by the Conference of Mennonites in Winnipeg, Canada.

Letter from E. F. S. Davies to MLK

E. F. S. Davies, Head of the Department of Philosophy at Virginia State College, writes Dr. King regarding A. J. Muste's civil rights efforts in the 1930's and 1940's.

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Letter from Edmund Gordon to MLK

Edmund W. Gordon expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's agreement to use his name in connection with the development of a Memorial Park honoring W.E.B Dubois. Mr. Gordon also informs Dr. King of the other participants of the project along with a brief description of his professional background.

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