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Civil rights

Associated Archive Content : 418 results

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Challenge to New Age - Importance of Voting

In this challenge to the public, the author lists a number of reasons supporting the importance of voting in the black community, then concludes with a call to join the ranks of the SCLC.

Chicago Freedom Fund Festival

The Chicago Freedom Fund Festival, organized by Mahalia Jackson, served as a benefit for the SCLC.

Chicago Freedom Rally

This document reflects an informational flyer regarding the Chicago Freedom Rally which promotes integration.

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty: Policies and Programs

This booklet outlining the priorities, policies, and programs of the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

City Wide Freedom Rally Featuring MLK

This 1964 program from a rally in Canton, Ohio, features Dr. King as speaker.

Civil Rights and Vietnam

An avid supporter urges Dr. King to divert his attention to the War in Vietnam. He asserts "This war will force Chinese and Russian to interfere and may further expand into thermonuclear war..."

Civil Rights Drive by SCLC and Other Groups Wins Open Housing Victory in Louisville

This 1967 SCLC news release details the passage of a law forbidding racial discrimination in housing in Louisville, Kentucky. It also details the role that SCLC and its sister organizations had in bring about this legislation.

Congratulations from Darien Public Schools Superintendent to MLK

Mr. Coffin congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Coffin also provides Dr. King with information on the initiatives of the Darien Public Schools to further progress the civil rights movement.

CORE - Progress Report #1

Benjamin Brown details the structure of the latest publication from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The CORE Guide to Negro History will be a composite of contributing essays, pictures, prized Negro literature and evaluations of social progress by current civil rights leaders. Beacon Press is listed as the potential publisher for the groundbreaking book.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

Dr. Abernathy Appeals to New Governor of Alabama

Ralph David Abernathy, vice-president of the SCLC, issues a press release concerning the federal governments decision to halt funding to the state of Alabama for noncompliance with the 'law of the land'. Abernathy appeals this decision and asserts that the blame should be directed towards local government officials such as George C. Wallace.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Makola

Dr. King thanks Mr. Makola for reminding him of the "injustices and inequalities" Negroes face both in the United States and South Africa. Dr. King asserts that the issues Negroes face are symptoms of a deeper issue involving foreign policy and that his current focus is on the Vietnam War.

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

Face the Nation Interview

This is a transcript of an August 1965 interview of Dr. King on the CBS television news program Face the Nation. King is asked to comment on numerous issues facing American society including the conflict in Vietnam, civil rights, housing and birth control.

Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This final organizing manual for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom details all logistics of the march, including the purpose of the march and accommodations for arriving in Washington, D.C.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Handwritten Draft Letter from MLK

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for the generous contribution made by Mr. Hunter and addresses questions that were asked in a previous letter.

Helping Across the South

Operation Freedom is an organization that originally began in west Tennessee to aid African Americans that were wrongly evicted from their homes due to the white power structure. The committees of Operation Freedom have expanded to other southern states where their help is needed.

Howard University Charter Day Observance

Howard University celebrates its' Charter Day Observance with a program that includes a speech by Dr. King. The program also acknowledges the recipients of the Alumni Achievement Award. Such individuals include Ossie Davis and Leroy F. Florant.

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

Hungry Club Speech

Dr. King speaks on "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He contends that the dilemma in the world is the result of three major evils: racism, poverty, and war. Dr. King encourages the audience to work toward making America a moral example for the rest of the world.

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

Installation Program for Rev. Kelly Miller Smith

This is the program for the installation of the Reverend Kelly Miller Smith as Pastor of the Antioch Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio. Reverend Smith is installed as the Eighth Minister of the historical church, which began in 1893.

International Convention of Christian Churches Session Schedule

This program for the International Convention of Christian Churches provides an itinerary for a one-day session taking place in Dallas, Texas. A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary, sends this final letter to coordinate all aspects and help guide participants. Dr. King is listed on the schedule as a guest speaker and intends to deliver an address entitled "Beyond Discovery Love."

Invitation from Earl S. Smith to MLK

Earl S. Smith invites Dr. King to speak at Montevideo, Uruguay on the methods of nonviolence in Latin America.

Invitation from the Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta Dinner Meeting

On behalf of the Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta, Chairman Mrs. John W. Stanley extends an invitation to an upcoming dinner meeting where Mrs. Eliza Paschall, Executive Director of the Community Relations Commission of the City of Atlanta, will be honored. Morehouse College President Emeritus Dr. Benjamin E. Mays is scheduled to discuss "Black Power versus White Power" with the attendees.

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