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Church and Race Relations

Associated Archive Content : 185 results

Letter from P. D. Thompson to MLK

P. D. Thompson, a member of the South African Institute of Race Relations, writes to Dr. King seeking help with South Africa's race relations.

Letter from Paul Madsen to MLK

Paul Madsen, Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, offers Dr. King a consulting position with the organization. The organization needs someone to provide guidance on critical decisions, appear at a limited number of speaking engagements, and to make suggestions to the organization as needed. He mentions that the consulting arrangement could be used to help Ebenezer Baptist Church's budget.

Letter from Rabbi Joel S. Goor to MLK

Rabbi Joel Goor extends his appreciation to Dr. King for being able to participate in SCLC's 1964 desegregation campaign in St. Augustine, Florida. He feels that his involvement in the civil rights movement spirtitually enhances his role as an active religious leader. Rabbi Goor encloses a donation to the SCLC for assisting with his bail while being jailed in St. Augustine and a copy of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King to autograph.

Letter from Rabbi Philip Hiat to MLK

Rabbi Philip Hiat, Executive Vice-President of the Synagogue Council of America, invites Dr. King to meet with Jewish religious leaders.

Letter from Rev. Lane Barton to MLK

Rev. Lane Barton, on behalf of Rev. James Pike and the St. Barnabas Episcopal Mission, corresponds with Dr. King in relation to their recent journey to Selma. In this positive affirmation Rev. Barton states, "I pray that the spirit of the living God which is going to and fro in the land and walking up and down in it will grasp us all and refashion us into one truly free and united republic."

Letter from Rev. Theodore L. Fischer to MLK

Rev. Theodore Fischer of the Comittee on Religion and Race of the Eastern Pennsylvania Synod offers support to end discrimination in housing.

Letter from Reverend A. S. Markham to MLK

Rev. Markham requests a response from Dr. King to an earlier letter. In the previous letter, Markham informed Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Shalom Synagogue would like to present an award to Dr. King.

Letter from Reverend Virgil W. Glanton to SCLC

In this letter, Reverend Virgil Glanton gives a contribution to SCLC and offers support for the Meredith March.

Letter from Robert K. Hudnut to MLK about a Monument

In this letter Robert K. Hudnut of the St. Luke Presbyterian Church offers an idea to Dr. King, namely to build a monument for those that have given their life in the line of civil rights. Hudnut proposes to call the monument "A Martyrs' Monument."

Letter from Robert Starbuck to the SCLC

Robert Starbuck encloses a contribution to the SCLC on behalf of supporters from Berlin, Germany. Starbuck has affiliations with many individuals tied to the American Civil Rights Movement and believes that it is imperative to contribute to the cause.

Letter from Roland Smith to MLK

Roland Smith requests that Dr. King prepare a list of themes for the Baptist Training Union. Smith encloses a copy of themes from the previous year for Dr. King to use as a template.

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

Letter from Ruth A. Salinger to MLK

Salinger requests that Dr. King provide contact information for civil rights leaders along the route of a scheduled trip to study race relations to be taken by high school students from the church communities of Concord, Massachusetts.

Letter from Sushil Joseph to MLK

Sushil Joseph, a student at the University of Denver, informs Dr. King of a term paper he is writing on the subject of "Church and the Race Relations." Joseph would like Dr. King to answer one of the questions he enclosed with this letter to aid him with his paper.

Letter from the Interseminary Movement's John Robert Nelson to MLK

J. Robert Nelson, National Chairman of the Interseminary Committee, invites Dr. King to be a part of their national conference with theological professors and students for the following year. He hopes that Dr. King will be the speaker on the subject of the Strategy of Churches and Ministers for Social Change.

Letter from the Secretary General of the Oversees Vietnamese Buddhist Association

In this correspondence VO VAN AI request assistance in denouncing the massacre at the School of Youth For Social Services in Vietnam.

Letter from Thomas H. Rogers to MLK

On Race Relations Sunday, Thomas H. Rogers writes this letter to express his brotherhood and prayers for Dr. King. Emphasizing that one live a life acceptable to God, Rogers believes that God, not man, makes the only judgement. Though of a different race than Dr. King, Rogers sees Dr. King as his brother in Christ and encourages him to do God's biding.

Letter from W. Ivan Hoy to MLK

W. Ivan Hoy, on behalf of the University of Miami, invites Dr. King to be a guest lecturer for their Miami Religion Lecture Series.

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from W.T. Durr to MLK

Pastor Durr donates funds to help Dr. King and his efforts of nonviolence.

Letter from Werner Kelber to MLK

German native and theological student Werner Kelber writes Dr. King expressing his discontent with the race relations in the Deep South. He compares the attitudes in the Deep South to those under Nazi Germany. Werner also explains that he would like to write his master's thesis on the movement and would value Dr. King's feedback.

Letter from William Ferguson to MLK

William Ferguson of Prairie View, Texas extends an invitation for Dr. King to address the community. The community of Prairie View is engaged in a multiracial boycott with the aid of many white ministers. They seek Dr. King's appearance to give vitality to their movement.

Letter from William Rutherford to MLK

William Rutherford expresses his enthusiasm for being a new addition to Dr. King's team. Rutherford also encloses newspaper clipping on the Pacem in Terris meetings.

Letter fromJitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Jituso Morikawa expresses his delight that Dr. King will make an attempt to alter his schedule to speak in Atlantic City to the American Baptist Jubilee Advance.

Letter to MLK from Lee Wood

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King explaining that the Democratic Party and Republican Party are "two shades of the same color." He suggests that because of his qualifications, Dr. King should run for President with Robert Kennedy as his Vice President.

Letter to MLK Requesting Information to Rebut Allegations of Communist Affiliation

Ernest O. Norquist, Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the Illinois Synod of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., commends Dr. King for his recent speech at Illinois Wesleyan University. He alerts Dr. King of the Birch Society’s attempts to spread allegations of his communist’s affiliations, and recommends a booklet refuting the charges and offers to help prepare and print it. Norquist requests a meeting with Dr. King in Chicago for himself, and other executive members of the Illinois Council of Churches to discuss how they can support Dr. King’s work.

Letter to Rev. Thomas Thrasher from MLK and Others

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders contact the President of the Montgomery Ministerial Association, Rev. Thomas Thrasher, to compliment him on his statement subsequent to the bombings in Alabama.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Long Beach Dispatch: American Talking Back

In this letter to the editor, Mr. Joseph Holmes uses rhetorical questions and graphic imagery to illustrate respective positions on the Vietnam War.

Looking Forward: The Montgomery Improvement Association, Inc.

This pamphlet outlines the ten points the Montgomery Improvement Association uses to promote healthy race relations.

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