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Church and Race Relations

Associated Archive Content : 185 results

Letter from Evelyn Rawley to Billy Mills

Evelyn E. Rawley writes Billy Mills, chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee, to express distaste for Mills' choice of colleagues, political activity, and lack of reason. Rawley affirms that Mill's irresponsible actions are an obstacle to democratic practices.

Letter from Frank H. Epp to MLK

On behalf of the Canadian Board of Christian Service, Frank H. Epp writes Dr. King inviting him to a series of scheduled discussions in Winnipeg in January of 1966.

Letter from Gwedolyn Johnson to MLK

Gwedolyn Johnson of Friendship Baptist invites Dr. King to a public speaking engagement held on his behalf. She encourages Dr. King to speak directly to the youth in an effort to increase moral and social activism. She requests a specific date in addition to estimated traveling costs.

Letter from Halevy H. Simmons to MLK

New York-based architect Halevy H. Simmons offers his professional services to rebuild Negro churches in the state of Georgia.These pillars of Negro culture were targeted throughout the state in a series of racially motivated hate crimes.

Letter from Ida Passano to MLK

Mrs. Ida Kemp Passano sends encouraging words to Dr. King along with her contribution to his efforts.

Letter from James E. Davis to MLK

Rev. James A. Davis requests the assistance of Dr. King in his graduate studies focusing on pastoral care and race relations. Davis was recently appointed as the assistant pastor of the Carroll Street Methodist Church in Nashville and expresses distaste with the fact that there are no Negroes members in the congregation. Davis wishes for the Carroll Street Methodist Church to become more inclusive.

Letter from James R. McDowell to Mrs. King

Rev. James McDowell, Headmaster of The Lovett School in Atlanta, informs Mrs. King that the application for Martin Luther King III has been rejected. Mrs. King's application represented the first formal Negro application in the history of The Lovett School, thus the Headmaster had consulted the Board of Trustees. Upon receiving the rejection from the Trustees, McDowell returns Mrs. King's check and apologizes for any inconvenience. Attached to this set of documents is Coretta's statement regarding why she wanted her son to attend The Lovett School.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Joani Kalmers to MLK

Joani Kalmers, a senior at Thiel College, requests information from Dr. King and the SCLC regarding her thesis topic "Christianity and the Negro."

Letter from John A. Clark to MLK Regarding Scriptures, Spiritual Advice and Prayer

In this letter, Reverend John A. Clark provides spiritual advice, scripture and prayer for Dr. King during hard times as well as for preparation of the future. Reverend John A. Clark also mentions starting a revival and revisiting Washington to D.C. to preach for a cause.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Letter from John Yungblut to MLK

John Yungblut writes to Dr. King to confirm his ability to lead a seminar for the Atlanta Meeting's Quaker House on the Philosophy and Practice of Non-violence.

Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Reverend L. K. Jackson commends Dr. King on his ongoing efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Rev. Jackson updates Dr. King on his recent activities, how hard he has been fighting for equality for all Americans, and regrets to inform him that he is ill.

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

The Baptist Pacifist Fellowship confirms that Dr. King will speak at its upcoming annual meeting. Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Fellowship, also encloses a brochure about the organization.

Letter from M. R. Cherry to MLK

M. R. Cherry, Dean of the School of Theology of Acadia University, writes Dr. King on behalf of the University inviting him to deliver the Hayward Lectures.

Letter from Marie L. Jones Regarding Reverend Ashton Jones

Mary L. Jones sent out this letter reporting on the plight of her husband, Reverend Ashton Jones, who was arrested in July of 1963 for attempting to lead an interracial student group into a service at the segregated First Baptist Church of Atlanta. Reverend Jones was sentenced to a year in the Georgia state prison and six months of hard labor for the crime of "disturbing a worship service." Mrs. Jones encourages readers of her letter to heed the advice of British social critic Bertrand Russell, by writing an "avalanche of letters" to those responsible.

Letter from MLK to Brothers-in-Christ

Dr. King requests the participation of those receiving the letter. He encourages members of congregations to attend the Freedom Rally and urges churches to partake in Freedom Sunday.

Letter from MLK to Crawford Johnson

Dr. King visited the city of Paris and was tremendously impressed with the people's interest or racial justice in the United States. Dr. King hopes that a meeting can take place to engage the people of Paris to further support the civil rights movement by providing financial aid to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Dr. L. K. Jackson

Dr. King regretfully informs Dr. L. K. Jackson that the Sunday he wants to preach at Ebenezer is one of the three Sundays that he is obliged to preach. Dr. King states the he knows Pastor Jackson understands his schedule and he would love to have him speak at his church in the future. Dr. King connects Pastor Jackson to Reverend Abernathy so that he can preach at his church.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Herman Strase

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Strase position on justice for all. More specifically, he praises Strase for his written sentiments concerning apartheid policies of the Union of South Africa government.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Everett Gendler

Dr. King thanks Rabbi Gendler for his significant contribution to the SCLC. He asserts that the financial contributions will aid in the SCLC's political and social agendas in Danville, Virginia.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John A. Clark

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Reverend Clark regarding the church's lax position on "racial justice and brotherhood among men." Although he cannot participate in Reverend Clark's suggested campaign, Dr. King encourages the minister to move forward with his plans of establishing a revival campaign to preach "the message of Our Lord at every opportunity."

Letter from MLK to Rev. John Papandrew

Dr. King thanks Rev. John Papandrew of New Hampshire for giving witness during the Albany Movement. Dr. King explains that, through the events in Albany, the world is now aware of the situation in the South.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Lucks Regarding Assistant Pastor

In this letter, Dr. King advises Rev. Lucks on choosing an assistant pastor.

Letter from MLK to Reverend George W. Goth

Dr. King writes Reverend George Goth of Metropolitan United Church declining his invitation to make an appearance at his church. Dr. King has engagements for the remainder of the year that hinder him from committing to any further appearances.

Letter from MLK to Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends

Dr. King commends the Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends for pursuing an initiative to buy a home in an all white section of Hartford, Connecticut. He proudly supports the project and extends his best wishes.

Letter from Mrs. Frances Pauley to Albany Residents

Mrs. Pauley provides a call to action amidst the troubles in Georgia so that everyone can participate to resolve the troubles.

Letter from Norman Baugher, Galen Ogden and W. Harold Row to MLK

Prominent officials from the Church of the Brethren's Committee on Race Relations writes Dr. King informing him of the power of television in promoting nonviolence. Since many individuals around the nation are unfamiliar with the practices of nonviolence, Norman Baugher, Galen Oden and W. Harold Row recommend that Dr. King call upon various associates to appear on television and educate the public on the nonviolent philosophy.

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