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Christian Education

Associated Archive Content : 125 results

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Book of Job, elaborating on the goodness of God and it's correlation with human suffering.

God

Dr. King references a quote from Proverbs regarding creation and God's wisdom.

God

Dr. King elaborates on Thomas Aquinas' views on the existence of God.

God

Dr. King quotes Donald M. Baillie's "God Was in Christ."

God (Malachi)

Dr. King writes notes regarding the prophet Malachi in the Old Testament of the Bible.

God - His Imminence

Dr. King takes notes on the immanence of God and quotes Victorian poet Alfred Tennyson's "The Higher Pantheism."

God's Existence

Dr. King cites Paul Tillich's perception of God's existence. This ideology is a Christological paradox for God "is being-itself" and beyond the essence of existence.

God's Omniscience

Dr. King references the Biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's omniscience. King notes that God knows everything before it is even done. This, however, does not have an effect on human free will.

Gregory the Great (540-604)

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding Gregory the Great otherwise known as Pope Gregory I.

Hegel

Dr. King documents a quote from philosopher Thomas Hegel regarding God and knowledge before commenting with his own thoughts.

Hints on Religious Music for Radio

This pamphlet, written by Charles Schmitz, acknowledges the impact of music on religious radio. Schmitz maintains that music helps establish the purpose of religious radio programs and that certain musical selections have the power to create Christian mood and comfort. This pamphlet gives instructions on how best to implement music.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.

Incarnation

Here, Dr. King notes that the problem of Jesus' Incarnation "boils down to" one single question.

Is Dialogue Alien to Marxism?" (Polemics)

Czech philosopher Julius Tomin discusses the role of dialogue within Marxist discourse. Critiquing the position set forth by Milan Machovec in his text "Sense of Life," Tomin outlines the the definition of dialogue, the climate necessary for a dialogue to occur, and the role of dialogue in the humanization of men.

Is Nonviolence Effective

Rev. P. R. Regamey writes a paper that discusses whether or not nonviolence is effective. He uses Gandhi's methods as a basis for the paper. Rev. Regamey also addresses the broader theory and practice of nonviolence.

Jesus

Dr. King records some quotes about Jesus. He quotes a passage that describes Jesus as being the person who brought about a new trust in God. Dr. King also discusses suffering.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's understanding of viewing Christ in relation to God's character.

Jesus Christ (Two Natures)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's notion of the "two natures of Christ." Reinhold Niebuhr was a scholastic mentor of Dr. King and was therefore cited in several of his theological works.

Jesus: Divinity and Missions

In this series of note cards, Dr. King documents various biblical passages from the New Testament that discuss Jesus' divinity. The passages are abbreviated and listed with their biblical citations.

Job and Suffering

Dr. King writes on the biblical figure Job and his view of suffering.

Letter from Anna Hedgeman to MLK

Dr. Hedgeman writes Dr. King to express her support for Dr. King's quality service that he has given America. He then targets Dr. King on a letter he received on the representation of the slogan "Black Power." Dr. Hedgeman feels the slogan relates strongly towards extremists and black supremacy. Lastly, she encloses a small contribution and two letters.

Letter from Arthur V. Hamman to MLK about Spirituality

In this letter, Mr. Hamman lectures Dr. King on the concept of heaven and hell, asserting that there is no race, nationality, etc., before God.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Dr. Mays requests the help of Dr. King and several other ministers to promote theological education among Baptist parishioners.

Letter from David Brandyberry to MLK

David Brandberry, a student 16 years of age, informs Dr. King that he desires to voice his opinion about the racial issues in the south. Mr. Brandberry cannot comprehend the logical reasoning of racism and the motives of the "ignorant whites." Furthermore, the student discusses the issues of immigration and the political concept of communism. Mr. Brandberry states that he "wish he had been born a Negro" to he could be of more assistance in the movement.

Letter from Frank H. Epp to MLK

On behalf of the Canadian Board of Christian Service, Frank H. Epp writes Dr. King inviting him to a series of scheduled discussions in Winnipeg in January of 1966.

Letter from Geraldine Fothergill to MLK

Geraldine Fothergill, a mother of seven of Hartford, Connecticut, offers Dr. King an idea about educating African American youths. She suggests that African American families develop a boarding program to house African American students that are accepted at traditionally white colleges distant from home. She also suggests that Dr. King, as a minister, can convince other ministers to support this program through the churches.

Letter from Harry Denman to Billy Graham and MLK

Harry Denman, an evangelist at the Methodist Church in Nashville, Tennessee, writes to Dr. King and Dr. Billy Graham in the hope that they will appear together for eight consecutive nights on a television program to be broadcast nationally and themed "God's Society."

Letter from Irene Bryson to MLK

Mrs. Bryson introduces herself as a former neighbor of the King family on Auburn Avenue and recalls fond memories during those years. She compliments Dr. King "as a God sent preacher," and cites biblical scriptures for him to incorporate in his public speaking. Bryson states, teaching God's word "is what it is going to take to help this sin sick world we are living in."

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