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Catholic Church

Associated Archive Content : 76 results

Supererogation

Dr. King defines supererogation.

Telegram from MLK to Reverend N. C. Burtenshaw

Dr. King sends his condolences for the death of Archbishop Paul Hallinan.

Template of Letter from MLK to SCLC Board Members

In this letter, Dr. King writes to an undisclosed board member of the S.C.L.C. to discuss an upcoming demonstration against the Vietnam War.

The Black Revolution

This pamphlet produced by the SCLC is an excerpt from Thomas Merton's "The Black Revolution: Letters to a White Liberal." Merton seeks to awaken the conscience of white America by presenting the Negro perspective in the struggle for civil rights. He discusses how Dr. King utilizes the philosophy of nonviolence as a tool of progress and the contrasting reaction of Negros based upon their religious association as either Christian or Muslim. The concluding message is a call for the complete reform of America's social system which permits and breeds injustice.

The Catholic Review: Letter From Birmingham Jail

Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" is printed in this publication along with articles and columns illustrating the Church's civil rights activities. Efforts included priests taking part in direct action to integrate an amusement park and an archbishop backing the civil rights bill.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

The Shaking Off of Burdens

Professor Robert Birley delivers an annual memorial lecture on T.B. Davie at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. He notes that Mr. Davie served as vice-chancellor for the college and is most noted for his adherence to the principles of academic freedom and his stand against apartheid. Birley believes that this annual memorial is absolutely necessary to maintain Davie's inspirational legacy and continue the fight for academic freedom . He brings up the politics of slaves versus the free, drawing on the philosophies of Aristotle, Plato, and others to describe examples.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

The Witness: MLK Writes from Birmingham Jail

"The Witness" publishes the second part of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." In this pivotal document, Dr. King expresses dissatisfaction with the white moderate and the white church regarding their silent stance on segregation and discrimination. He urges individuals to understand the delays, broken promises, and intimidation Negroes face to secure their freedom.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

Transformed Nonconformist

Dr. King discusses the importance of not conforming in a sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the hardships and the benefits that come with being a transformed non-conformist.

Trent, Canons and Decrees of the Council of

Dr. King records some thoughts on the Decrees of the Council of Trent regarding the Catholic Church's response to the Protestant Reformation.

Trinitarianism

Dr. King discusses the doctrine trinitarianism, the belief that God is one being, existing in three equal persons.

True Democracy

Reverend O. J. P. Wetklo explains his ideas of true democracy, which he gives a Christian foundation and compares to the natural world. He calls true democracy "a perfect brotherhood of man," and he argues that each individual member of society must take responsibility for the whole.

Two Americas

This essay highlights the realities of poverty stricken aliens in an affluent society. Through its examination of Negro-white relations, urban riots, and the War on Poverty, the author insists that the nonviolent struggle for civil rights must continue.

Vision of a World Made New

This is a draft of "The Vision of a World Made New," a speech that Dr. King delivered during the 1954 Women's Auxiliary Convention. President Nannie H. Burroughs invited Dr. King to address the group's annual meeting where he condemned imperialism, colonialism, and segregation.

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