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Assassination

Associated Archive Content : 52 results

Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination. Memphis, 1968

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

An Appeal by Puerto Ricans for Fair Treatment

This document reviews the economic, political, and cultural disparity of Puerto Ricans. The authors explain the history of American imperialism in Puerto Rico and how Puerto Ricans have been mistreated in the United States, particularly in New York. Criticizing the Vietnam War, the authors suggest focusing the funding used abroad on community building.

And There Was Love

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Anonymous Letter of Support for Reverend Ralph Abernathy

An unknown author warns Rev. Abernathy to protect himself from those who might try to harm him and other Negro civil rights leaders.

Antisemitism

An anonymous group issues a public statement addressing the rising issue of antisemitism throughout the world. According to the document, Soviet Jewry are facing "cultural extinction." As a result, Soviet relations have worsened in Israel. The group indicates that the policies of the U.S.S.R. have caused this wave of antisemitic discrimination and a nation-wide effort will have to help eradicate the movement.

Bogalusa

Antoinette McNally retells the story of a Negro man who was brutally murdered for the alleged rape of a white woman. McNally shares that the story has been kept silenced for forty-six years.

Comments on John F. Kennedy by MLK at the Berlin Festival

Dr. King gave this speech at the Berlin Freedom Festival in Berlin, West Germany, in memorial to the recently assassinated President John F. Kennedy. Dr. King reflects on the personality, achievements and enormous influence Kennedy had on the world. He highlights Kennedy's commitment to international human rights, which included recognition of Negro rights, and his leadership in concluding the atmospheric nuclear test ban treaty.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Charles Ocasio

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is a letter of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

Did President Kennedy Die in Vain

"Did President Kennedy Die In Vain" describes the author's request that we elect officials with a higher moral bearing and adherence to Christian principles.

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Ebenezer Church Bulletin and President Kennedy's Eulogy

This is an Ebenezer Baptist Church bulletin expressing appreciation for the congregation's various acts of kindness toward one another. On the opposite side of the bulletin, an outline can be found for a memorial speech for the late President Kennedy.

Eulogy for Robert W. Spike

Dr. King highlights the life and work of American clergyman, theologian, and civil rights leader, Robert W. Spike. Spike was a leader known for mobilizing church participation for the Civil Rights Movement. Less than one year after accepting a professorship at the University of Chicago, he was murdered.

Georgia Council on Human Relations: Program Highlights

This newsletter informs readers of the upheaval in the state of Georgia by reporting a variety of incidents around the state. The program focuses on events around Atlanta, including an attack in the Dixie Hills community in which two Molotov cocktails were thrown and, during the ensuing chaos, one man one was killed by a shotgun blast and three others wounded.

Invitation to John F. Kennedy Funeral

This telegram sent from The White House in Washington, invites Dr. King to participate in the funeral services for President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from Anne Farnsworth to MLK

Anne Farnsworth acknowledges the kind letters Dr. King sends thanking her for the past financial contributions she has made to the movement. She further encloses a check in honor of the four little girls killed in the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham and the assassination of President Kennedy.

Letter from Dale Rickmon to Rev. Abernathy

This letter of condolence is addressed to the Reverend Abernathy as the succeeding head of the SCLC. It accompanies a memorial poem written in dedication to Dr. King.

Letter from Erma Jewell Hughes to MLK

Erma Jewell Hughes writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize award and cover on Time Magazine as "Man of the Year." Hughes invites the Reverend to speak at the Business College's annual commencement and encloses traveling expenses for the event. Hughes also states that they are raising additional funds to go towards the "Freedom Fight."

Letter from Harold Weisberg to MLK

Harold Weisberg discusses the Kennedy assassination and writes to ask Dr. King if he could meet with him and discuss what he has learned about the issue.

Letter from Helen Hickey to Mrs. King

In this letter Helen Hickey sends her sympathy to Mrs. King pertaining to the loss of her husband. She also comments on the personal characteristics that she admired most about Dr. King.

Letter From John Payak to Mrs. King & Family

John Payak offers condolences from a religious perspective to Mrs. King and family.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harold E. Carlson

Dr. King writes Reverend Carlson to thank him for his recent telegram of encouragement and support. Dr. King states, "You may be confident that such reassurance provides us with an additional source of strength." Dr. King also discusses the philosophy of the SCLC.

Letter from Morris A. Morse to Rev. Abernathy

Morris Morse sends his condolences regarding the death of Dr. King. Mr. Morse further explains his opposition of the idea of building a two million dollar church in Dr. King's honor, because he believes that the reverend would not want such a memorial when so many people are in need.

Letter from Mrs. Joan Kimmey to Coretta Scott King

On behalf of the Baha'is in Teaneck, New Jersey, this letter offers condolences to Mrs. King for the recent assassination of her husband, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Heartfelt sentiments express admiration for Dr. King's vision, dedication, and teachings.

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

Letter from Ossie Davis to MLK Regarding Malcolm X Assassination

In this letter, Ossie Davis asserts to Dr. King that it is true that there is one law for whites and another for blacks. Ossie continues by expressing his feelings on Malcolm X's assassination. He closes his letter by asking for Dr. King's signature and monetary donation for an ad.

Letter from Pat Carter to MLK

Dr. King receives a letter from Miss Pat Carter, the public relations director at Katz Radio, thanking him for his address regarding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from Seabury Press to MLK

Alda Lee Boyd, publicity director for the Seabury Press, asks Dr. King if he would write a statement that can be used to promote "The Jon Daniels Story." The book is about an Episcopal seminary student, Jonathan Daniels, who was killed while working in Mississippi following the Selma to Montgomery March.

Letter from the Secretary General of the Oversees Vietnamese Buddhist Association

In this correspondence VO VAN AI request assistance in denouncing the massacre at the School of Youth For Social Services in Vietnam.

Letter from Theresa Sutherland to Coretta S. King

Theresa Sutherland sends her condolences to Mrs. King following the death of Dr. King.

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