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Apartheid--South Africa

Apartheid (Afrikaans for apart-hood) was the policy of racial segregation adopted by the National Party governments of South Africa from 1948 to 1994. Under this policy South Africans were classified as Bantu (blacks), Coloured (mixed-race), White and Asian. Racial separation was enforced in living areas, employment, transportation, public facilities, education and social contact. The white minority controlled all aspects of social, political and economic life. Black Africans living outside designated areas were forcibly removed to Bantustans (homelands/reservations). Resistance to this policy was met with state violence (e.g. 1962 Sharpeville massacre and the 1976 Soweto uprising). After decades of domestic and international efforts to abolish the system, the policy was dismantled in negotiations occurring between 1990 and 1993. In 1994 Nelson Mandela, a leader of the African National Congress who had spent 27 years in prison, was elected president of the country. In 1962 Dr. King, an early critic of apartheid, joined fellow Nobel Peace laureate Chief Albert Luthuli in an appeal against the policy.

Associated Archive Content : 47 results

1965 Human Rights Day Flyer

This flyer advertises a rally to benefit South African victims of apartheid.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Aid Victims of South Africa's Racism

Members of the American Committee on Africa solicit funding for the support and advancement of victims of Apartheid in South Africa. This brochure highlights the unjust treatment of black South Africans through individual testimonies.

American Committee On Africa Invitation to Protest Apartheid

This form letter informs and invites the recipients to attend functions sponsored by the American Committee on Africa in protest against Chase Manhattan Bank's financial relationship with the apartheid regime in South Africa.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An unknown author questions Dr. King about his leadership and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. He references various racial, political, and social events, and stresses that Dr. King is responsible for all the riots, violence and looting.

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

Fundraising Letter from MLK Addressed to Friends

Dr. King writes this letter on behalf of the Workers Defense League, requesting funds to assist six South African youth who seek political protection in the U.S.

H. Rap Brown Requests SNCC Support

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's New York office of International Affairs, requests support during the August 27, 1967 boycott of General Motors. After declaring itself a Human Rights organization, SNCC requests support in the worldwide struggle for human rights, especially black liberation schools in the United States.

Harry Belafonte - American Committee on Africa

Harry Belafonte sends a request for support in South Africa bringing awareness to apartheid and the injustices it entails. Belafonte implores the reader to send immediate help to the country in financial contributions, as an effort to fight racism and government corruption.

Invitation from C.W. De Kiewiet to MLK

Cornell William De Kieweit invites Dr. King to speak as the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecturer at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Mr. De Kieweit explains the civil rights struggle in South Africa and explains that Dr. King's appearance would be of great help.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

A. Philip Randolph writes Dr. King requesting that he join as a sponsor in the campaign to decrease customers of the two chief banks supporting apartheid in South Africa.

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

Letter from Arthur Newberg to Senator Roman Hruska

Reverend Arthur H. Newberg writes this letter to Nebraska Senator Roman L. Hruska (R-NE) regarding an investigation of United States investments and corporation operations in South Africa. Due to international and national consequences, Newberg solicits help with pressuring the decision to subpoena key witnesses that are U.S. corporate and government officials. The author is concerned that the investigation may confirm "the existence of a pattern of American economic support for South African apartheid."

Letter from Charles E. Waring to Mr. Paul Harvey

Charles Waring presents ways to prevent the spread of communism around the world. He also questions previous decisions by the United States government and speculates how the outcome would have been different in various conflicts.

Letter from Christian Action to MLK

L. John Collins, Chairman of Christian Action, writes Dr. King inquiring if he would be interested in attending a public meeting in London regarding race relations in South Africa. In addition to Dr. King, one of the prospective speakers mentioned was James Baldwin.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Letter from Ira Edmond Gillet to MLK

Mr. Gillet, a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and former missionary in South Africa, sends Dr. King his thoughts on a recent petition circulated by the American Committee on Africa. He explains that the actions called for in the petition would "do more harm than good." Gillet encloses a copy of the petition, highlighted with his own comments, which implores President Kennedy to impose sanctions on South Africa.

Letter from James Farmer to MLK

Chairman J. Farmer gives Dr. King a report from the National Advisory Committee of CORE.

Letter from Jill Chisholm to MLK

Ms. Chisholm, from South Africa, informs Dr. King of her temporary stay in the United States to research the non-violent movement and work of SCLC. She request to meet with Dr. King to discuss his work in Atlanta, GA and Chicago, IL.

Letter From Jimmy Williams to MLK

Jimmy Williams, a U.S. Air Force officer, writes Dr. King requesting assistance in protesting his unjust termination from Officers Training School.

Letter from Mildred Lynch to MLK

Secretary of the Canadian Anti-Apartheid Committee Mrs. Mildred Lynch inquires about Dr. King's availability to join group members for an upcoming 1968 public meeting to be held in Toronto.

Letter from MLK to Herman Strase

Dr. King writes to Mr. Herman Strase expressing his appreciation for an earlier letter that including sentiments to extend justice to all people regardless of race. The Reverend states that he agrees with Strase regarding the demand of Christianity in the expression of compassion and love for all people, no matter their race.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Herman Strase

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Strase position on justice for all. More specifically, he praises Strase for his written sentiments concerning apartheid policies of the Union of South Africa government.

Letter from MLK to Naomi Thomas

Dr. King explains to Naomi Thomas his reasons for supporting athletes who plan to boycott the Olympics.

Letter from MLK to Peter Mansfield

Dr. King accepts the invitation extended by Peter Mansfield, Acting President of the National Union of South African Students, to give the opening address for the organization's 41st Annual Congress at the University of Natal in South Africa.

Letter from N. M. Nel to MLK

N. M. Nel writes to inform Dr. King that his visa application for South Africa has been denied.

Letter from P. D. Thompson to MLK

P. D. Thompson, a member of the South African Institute of Race Relations, writes to Dr. King seeking help with South Africa's race relations.

Letter from Philip Randolph to MLK

A. Philip Randolph, the Chairman of the Committee of Conscience Against Apartheid, sent this letter to urge Chase Manhattan and First National City Banks users to withdraw their funds to signify their disapproval of their engagement in South Africa.

Letter from Students of Southern Africa to MLK

Students from South Africa write Dr. King to express their concerns regarding the United States' diplomatic relations with the Republic of South Africa.

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