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Afro-Americans - Civil rights

Associated Archive Content : 198 results

Letter from Ms. Katherine Livermore to MLK

Ms. Livermore criticizes Dr. King for his alleged association with the Communist Party. She also makes several historical and contextual references to slavery and the current plight of the Negro race. She concludes with a warning, "be careful this summer."

Letter from Nathaniel L. Hawthorne to MLK

Nathaniel Lee Hawthorne, who describes himself as “a nonviolent militant Negro” from rural Virginia, asks Dr. King for advice on publishing a book. Hawthorne wants to tell the nation what it feels like to be poor

Letter from Paul Eshelman to MLK

Mr. Eshelman writes to Dr. King in support of his efforts toward helping African Americans become "first class citizens."

Letter from Postal Worker to MLK

An anonymous postal worker requests that Dr. King write a letter to the regional director of the Atlanta Post Office concerning discriminatory employment practices.

Letter from Secretary to Daniel C. Thompson

Dr. King's Secretary writes Dr. Daniel Thompson of Howard University and encloses a foreword written by Dr. King, discussing violence and the philosophies of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration to Henry Brownell

The Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Nonviolent Integration request a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss the federal government's plans.

Letter from Stephen Holden to MLK

Stephen Holden, staff editor for the American Peoples Encyclopedia, wrote this letter to Dr. King to request an article for inclusion in the publication's 1968 edition.

Letter from Susan Drubin to SCLC

Ms. Drubin desires to make a monetary contribution to the SCLC to continue the work of Dr. King. As such, she writes to obtain more information about the procedures for contributing a percentage of her annual salary. She finalizes her letter by noting that she is taking a speech course in which she hopes to use the information sent to her to draft a speech.

Letter from Tim Bowden to MLK

Tim Bowden requests an interview with Dr. King for the Australian Broadcasting Commission.

Letter from V.R. Hardy to MLK

V.R. Hardy lectures Dr. King regarding his methods of obtaining equality. He asserts that such methods will only result in a race of people wallowing in self-pity. Hardy cites the long-term oppression of Jews as a case in point of how to overcome the tragedies of the past.

Letter from W. A. F. Braem to MLK

Mr. Braem writes Dr. King emphasizing the importance of self-reliance. Braem list some issues that Civil Rights leaders should pay attention to such as education.

Letter from William Reynolds to MLK

Mr. Reynolds writes Dr. King requesting to use quotations from his April 5th speech to encourage a higher attendance at future vigils in the Bay Area.

Letter to MLK concerning nonviolent approaches

Mrs. Ettinger offers Dr. King advice on a alternative approach to advance human rights. She also explains how it is up to blacks within the communities to make a better effort towards equality.

Letter to the Public of Montgomery, Alabama

The ministerial leaders of Montgomery address the problems of discrimination and segregation within the city's bus system. The ministers form a plan of action to eliminate such practices and attain a equal society for all.

Memorandum from Stanley Levison Regarding Congressman Powell

This memorandum from Mr. Levison concerns legal issues regarding Congressman Adam Clayton Powell. His position is that those issues, valid or not, need examination in the overall context of "the real issue...the undemocratic nature of the congressional system."

Memorandum Regarding The March On Washington For Jobs and Freedom

In this memorandum, Bayard Rustin provides various civil rights leaders with the agenda for their upcoming leadership meeting regarding the 1963 March on Washington For Jobs and Freedom.

Memorandum to the SCLC Staff

In a memorandum sent to the SCLC staff, just days before Dr. King's assassination, Tom Offenburger informs members of a meeting Dr. King had with his advisers. The main focus of the meeting was the march in Memphis which turned violent, as well as the future of the Poor People's Campaign. In spite of the violence, there remains plans to go to Washington and correct the economic racism the US faces.

Miss Mahalia Jackson in Concert

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference presents Miss Mahalia Jackson in concert, marking "another milestone in her personal dedication to the drive for complete freedom for all humanity."

MLK Accepts Nobel Peace Prize

In his acceptance speech at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in Oslo, Norway, Dr. King dedicates his award to the nonviolent struggle necessary for overcoming the oppression and violence afflicting American Negroes.

MLK Address on Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War

Dr. King addresses the French community during his "Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War" speech. He discusses topics such as poverty, politics, war, and the government.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

MLK Announces End of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, issued this statement following the US Supreme Court’s decision declaring laws requiring segregation on busses unconstitutional. He announces that the year-long bus boycott is officially over and urges Negroes to return to the buses the next morning on a non-segregated basis. Negroes need to adopt a spirit of understanding toward their white brothers, he says. It is time to move from protest to reconciliation.

MLK Confidential Memorandum

Dr. King outlines the SCLC's direct action program for the communities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery.

MLK Interview on NBC's Meet the Press

This edition of NBC's Meet the Press featured Dr. King for a discussion concerning the Civil Rights Movement and its demonstrations. The interview was moderated by Ned Brooks and the panel featured John Chancellor, James J. Kilpatrick, Tom Wicker and Lawrence E. Spivak.

MLK Interview with Associated Press on Operation Breadbasket

This document contains the questions asked and responses given by Dr. King during an interview with the Associated Press regarding SCLC's Operation Breadbasket. Operation Breadbasket was a program geared towards securing jobs and economic development in Negro communities. At the time of this interview, Operation Breadbasket had been in existence for five years in Atlanta and 15 months in Chicago with much success.

MLK Notes - Voting Issues and Strategies

These handwritten notes of Dr. King's, found on the back of a memorandum, focus largely on voter registration issues and strategies. Of interest is an item adjacent to the body of the notes remarking, "Daddy King has yet to understand non-violence."

MLK on Student Sit-Ins

Dr. King applauds the students participating in sit-in demonstrations and states that the leaders must develop a strategy for victory. He suggests topics for discussion including: creating an organization, a nationwide selective buying campaign, training for jail not bail, further exploration of nonviolence, and taking the freedom struggle into every community without exception. These suggestions led to the formation of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

MLK Speech: Acceptance of Spingarn Medal

Dr. King addresses the attendees at the NAACP 48th Annual Convention in Detroit, Michigan. He acknowledges the noble men and women of the Montgomery Bus Boycott Movement, for which his leadership earned him this award. Dr. King also discusses the ongoing struggle for civil rights and the nonviolent approach needed for the American Negro to win freedom and justice.

MLK Statement to Time Magazine

In this statement to Time Magazine, Dr. King responds to President John F. Kennedy's call for new civil rights legislation.

MLK's Address About South Africa

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

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