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Afro-Americans - Civil rights

Associated Archive Content : 198 results

Letter from Alfonzo Henderson to Afro-Americans

This letter from ARIDO (Afro-American Resource Industrial Development Organization) president Alfonzo Henderson outlines the organization's program goals.

Letter from Ann Lincoln to MLK

The writer, who identifies herself as a "collateral descendent of Abraham Lincoln," relates a story involving a young colored girl to Dr. King. Ms. Lincoln explains that the incident disturbed her greatly and she feels it is time to educate Negros on white acceptance.

Letter from Atlantiv Human Resources to MLK

The officers of Atlantic Human Resources invite Dr. King to be the guest of honor and main speaker at their second Annual Meeting.

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Letter from Benjamin E. Smith to MLK

This report highlights a Birmingham conference on the "Ways and Means to Integrate the Deep South" sponsored by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. This conference included several hundred white and black leaders who sought to integrate the South.

Letter from C. Ray Ballard to MLK Regarding Adam Clayton Powell

In this letter, Mr. Ballard expresses disappointment to hear a recent radio report of Dr. King's political support for Adam Clayton Powell. Mr. Ballard defines this as a missed opportunity to promote racial justice.

Letter from Chester Harness to MLK

Chester Harness expresses to Dr. King his interest of being an honorary member of SCLC. He explains that due to the Vietnam War he can not make a financial contribution but he would like to contribute by participating in the Poor People's Campaign of 1968.

Letter from Doris Everett to MLK

Ms. Everett expresses appreciation to Dr. King for leading a successful boycott in Montgomery, Alabama and for his contributions to help Negros obtain equality.

Letter from Dr. King to anonymous

In a handwritten draft addressed simply to "gentleman," Dr. King expressed gratitude for having received a copy of a study entitled "Civil Disobedience: Morality and the Coming of the Civil War." So impressed with the contents of the book, Dr. King made it available to staff as reference resource.

Letter from Durand R. Kinloch to MLK

Supporter Durand Kinloch describes himself as "an average white graduate student" with two children who wants to continue to support Dr. King's fight for civil rights. He stresses that love and nonviolence are needed more than ever as he witnesses a resurgence of hate in 1967.

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.

Letter From George Patton Jr. to MLK

George Patton expresses his disdain to Dr. King about the names that whites call "Black Americans" and offers a list of names that blacks should be "referred to as."

Letter from George Y. Sodowick to MLK

George Sodowick expresses to Dr. King disapproval of the planned Poor Peoples Campaign of 1968. Sodowick suggests that, instead of occupying Washington, the demonstrators should settle in and enhance "riot torn cities."

Letter from Gerald Gotting to MLK

Gerald Gotting writes a letter in German requesting a peaceful end to the Vietnam war.

Letter From Henry Springs Jr. to MLK

Mr. Henry Springs requests Dr.King's help in creating "Action Programs," that would be beneficial to the African-American community in Lake County, Illinois.

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Payments from England

Literary agent Joan Daves provides Dr. King with detailed figures of royalties from an anthology containing his work and the British edition of "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Joe Augustine to MLK

Mr. Augustine claims that he is able to point directly to who is responsible for the wrong that is going on in the country, and would like to mail Dr. King more information to this effect.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Co-Chairman Julian Bond welcomes Dr. King and other members of the SCLC to the National Conference for New Politics. Bond also comments on past civil rights victories, and he mentions future organizational directions.

Letter from Laurie Bush to MLK

Laurie Bush writes to Dr. King requesting information about the Civil Rights Movement for his or her research paper.

Letter from Leroy R. Weiner

Leroy R. Weiner writes Mr. Harry Belafonte addressing a recent appeal made on behalf of the organization SNCC.

Letter from M.J. McGrayle to MLK

M.J. McGrayle from Chicago expresses his or her concerns to Dr. King. McGrayle does not understand some of the actions of African Americans and disagrees with Dr. King's marches. The author believes that many of the events taking place within the Civil Rights Movement are further separating the races, as "black people are afraid of" whites. As a white person, McGrayle states, "I lived in Birmingham, Ala[bama] and took the colored peoples part," though now in disagreement, will "do nothing more for the colored people."

Letter from Margaret Long to MLK

Margaret Long asks Dr. King to reconsider his plans for the demonstration in Washington, D.C. She expresses that though she understands why Dr. King advocates for demonstrations, she does not believe it will be advantageous.

Letter from Matthew T. Doherty to MLK

Matthew Doherty responds to an "eloquent and moving" appeal from Dr. King in the July 26th issue of The New York Times. Doherty discusses the recent surge in "black power" and its role in the ongoing struggle for equal rights. The writer also mentions his "small" contribution to aid Dr. King's efforts to "make this a better world for all of us."

Letter from MLK and Others to H. Brownell

Dr. King and other prominent clergymen "urgently request" a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss discrimination against bus passengers.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Milton Rokeach

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Rokeach concerning the involvement of social scientists and the civil rights movement. Dr. King encourages Dr. Rokeach to become actively involved with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter From MLK to Mr. Berkowitz

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding demonstrations in Montgomery.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson

Dr. King requests government assistance for the impoverished communities of the Mississippi Delta. He then provides a course of action to improve the standard of living within those communities.

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. B. Wilson

Dr. King conveys gratitude to Rev. C. B. Wilson of Southern Baptist Church for a contribution to SCLC. King explains the increasing expenses of the Civil Rights Movement at a time when liberals are redirecting their attention to the peace issue.

Letter from MLK to Rev. James A. Shiflett

Dr. King conveys his appreciation to Reverend Shiflett of Chicago for his involvement in and support of the Albany Movement.

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