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National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)

The NAACP was founded in 1909 to promote racial equality. Its first efforts focused on ending lynching and protesting D. W. Griffith’s film, Birth of a Nation. In 1910, the NAACP journal The Crisis was started with W. E. B. DuBois as editor. The NAACP successfully challenged the separate-but-equal doctrine, winning the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling in 1954. The NAACP’s lobbying efforts were instrumental in achieving integration of the military (1948) and passage of the Civil Rights Acts (1957, 1964, and 1968) and Voting Rights Act (1965). The NAACP supported the Montgomery Bus Boycott, collaborated with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) on civil rights campaigns, and helped organize the 1963 March on Washington. Opposed to Dr. King’s public stand on the Vietnam War, the NAACP continued to work with him on the plight of urban blacks.

Associated Archive Content : 387 results

Helping Across the South

Operation Freedom is an organization that originally began in west Tennessee to aid African Americans that were wrongly evicted from their homes due to the white power structure. The committees of Operation Freedom have expanded to other southern states where their help is needed.

Herbert Hill Statement Before the House Committee on Education and Labor

Herbert Hill, National Labor Director for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, addresses the House Committee on Education and Labor regarding the questionable practices conducted by the leadership of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union.

Highlander Reports: Black Power in Mississipi

In this newsletter, the writers speak about various issues concerning African Americans and their discrimination in politics.

How Much Head Start for Mississippi's Children?

Kay Longcope describes the current status of the Child Development Group of Mississippi following the decision to pull funding for the program made by the Office of Economic Opportunity.

In Memoriam MLK: New York Times

This newspaper clipping is one of several full-page "In Memoriam" dedications featured in various newspapers following the assassination of Dr. King. The clippings by the NAACP accompany a letter from the Public Relations Director of the organization to the Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, newly installed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's death.

Insight Broward: Bullets, Backflips & Baby-Talk

Moreland Smith forwarded a copy of Insight Broward Magazine for Dr. King to view. In this collection of articles, Jim Corvell expresses his disapproval of Alcee Hastings, a local NAACP lawyer, who was a candidate for the House of Representatives. Coryell heatedly describes his efforts to thwart what he called "the [N]egro racist's political plans.

Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change: Reformation for Freedom

This 1957 program with the theme "Dignity with Humility, Love with Courage and Justice without Violence" details an event of the Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change, in which Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker. Though his affiliation is listed as President of Montgomery's Improvement Association, Dr. King appeared as leader of the nascent Southern Christian Leadership Conference, formed January 10, 1957.

Inter-Faith Mass Meeting

This program is for an Inter-Faith Mass Meeting that was co-sponsored by Mt. Zion Baptist Church and Zion Baptist Church. The meeting took place on June 11, 1967 and features Dr. King as the speaker.

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

Invitation from Douglas Davis to MLK

Douglas A. C. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at the University of Western Ontario's School of Business Administration. He explains that Dr. King's visit will be one of great pleasure and honor.

Is It Wrong to Segregate?

This Sermon titled "Is It Wrong to Segregate?" was delivered by the Reverend A. L. Kendrick on June 5, 1960. He expounds on several topics including equal rights, communism and the political element of the government.

Johnson Said to be Choice of Negroes

Kivie Kaplan, the President of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said that they would be endorsing Johnson for President. Kaplan said their decision was not made lightly, and they will always endorse the candidate who has a principle of equality for all.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

King to Visit Southside Virginia

This article describes Dr. King's visit to Virginia on the "people-to-people" tour as a part of the Poor People's Campaign.

King's Viet Stand Has Cost Him Some Financial Support

The Associated Press releases this article acknowledging the lack of funding forwarded to the SCLC because of Dr. King's views on Vietnam. The article also discusses how various other civil rights organizations have received more contributions based on the financial support drawn away from Dr. King. However, the article notes that Dr. King emphasizes the imperative link between the civil rights and peace movements.

King's Way Hurts Rights Movement

Mr. White, author of this article, argues that the political fallout from Dr. King's stance on America's involvement in Vietnam hinders the goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Lecture Tour Request from David Bilk to MLK

David Bilk, representing the British National Union of Students, requests that Dr. King present a lecture series for the larger British Universities explaining the past, present, future of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Letter and Article from D. Parke Gibson to MLK

D. Parke Gibson sends this article in Race Relations and Industry to Dr. King with the intention of including him in a future issue of the magazine. Those involved in the article agree that progress towards having minorities in leadership roles is on the rise, but not fast enough.

Letter fom Edmond Jansson to the Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee

Edmond Jansson writes a letter to the members of the Senate Judiciary Committee contradicting a report on how Roy Wilkins was treated in Salt Lake City, Utah. A copy was sent to Dr. King.

Letter from A. Bohdan to MLK

A. Bohdan, catering manager of Sydney, Australia's Chevron Hotel, writes Dr. King in request of his favorite meal to include on a special menu featuring dishes of other "famous personalities in Politics, Industry, and Art."

Letter from A. J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

A. J. de Witte writes Roy Wilkins condemning him for scolding Dr. King's outspoken dissatisfaction with the war in Vietnam. Witte explains the importance of civil rights leaders engaging in the discussion surrounding the war.

Letter from A. K. Magugu to MLK

The Office of Kenya National Celebrations congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. In addition, the author encloses an invitation card in hopes that the Reverend may attend their Anniversary and Republic Day Celebrations.

Letter from A.J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

A.J. de Witte conveys his dissatisfaction to Roy Wilkins over the NAACP's criticism of Dr. King's opposition to the Vietnam War. De Witte withdraws his financial support to the NAACP, instead contributing to Dr. King, Stokley Carmichael of SNCC and Floyd McKissick of CORE.

Letter from A.M. Davis to Mr. James Parham Regarding Emory Case

A. M. Davis, President of the NAACP's Atlanta Branch, wrote this letter as part of an Atlanta Medical Association complaint against Emory University.

Letter from A3C Johnson to MLK

Mr. Johnson writes to Dr. King requesting a recommendation letter for reclassification. Johnson explains that he is highly affiliated and a notable person must write his recommendation.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Letter from Alma Szatmary to MLK

Alma Szatmary writes Dr. King concerning his stance on the Vietnam war. Szatmary writes that it should be prohibited for Puerto Ricans and African Americans to serve as oppressors in Vietnam when they are the ones being oppressed here at home.

Letter from Amelia Jones to MLK and the SCLC

The Toldeo NAACP Branch invites Dr. King to be their keynote speaker. Amelia Jacobs Jones, representing the NAACP, requests that suggested dates regarding Dr. King's availability be forwarded to her.

Letter from Amelia P. Boynton to the SCLC

Amelia Boynton writes the members of the SCLC seeking financial assistance to help purchase a particular piece of land to help start a new sewing machine factory and other projects in Selma, Alabama. Boynton provides details of the history of the struggle of people of color in Selma, and stresses that the land would be used to help teach the underprivileged in the area to help themselves.

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

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