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Wilkins, Roy

b. 1901 - d. 1981

Roy Wilkins was born in St. Louis. A University of Minnesota graduate, he was editor of the St. Paul (Minnesota) Appeal and the Kansas City Call. After serving as assistant to the executive secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), he succeeded W. E. B. DuBois as editor of The Crisis. Wilkins co-founded the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, which coordinated every major legislative campaign for civil rights. From 1955 to 1977, he served as the NAACP’s executive secretary and provided legal counsel and funds for the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Although he advocated a legal approach to equal rights, Wilkins helped organize the March on Washington, took part in the Selma to Montgomery marches and participated in the March Against Fear. In 1967, he was appointed to the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders to investigate the causes of urban riots.

Associated Archive Content : 97 results

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson, a civil rights activist and politician, invites Dr. King to speak at a concert that will benefit the children of Medgar Evers and the families of the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Culbertson explains that the program will feature performances from different choirs. He also mentions that if Dr. King is unable to attend, he would appreciate Dr. King's help securing another prominent speaker.

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Letter From Leslie W. Dunbar

Leslie Dunbar outlines information regarding a grant and various agency protocols from the Southern Regional Council for voter registration.

Letter from Lloyd Wilson to Roy Wilkins

Lloyd Wilson affirms his support for Dr. King, but he cannot agree with Dr. King's recent statements concerning the Vietnam War. He lists a series of questions hoping to gain clarity from Dr. King or Mr. Wilkins.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

Letter from Mrs. Ross D. Davis to MLK

Mrs. Davis invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker for the Women's National Democratic Club.

Letter from Ned French to MLK

A high school student requests the political opinions of several famous individuals concerning the national issues and potential candidates of the 1968 presidential election.

Letter from Rev. J. H. Cole to Roy Wilkins and MLK

Rev. Cole writes to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to convey his disgust at the treatment of Negroes in such areas as housing, education, politics and police brutality. He suggests the initiation of a nationwide letter writing campaign to every member of Congress to highlight this treatment and seeks a program that will provide Negroes with jobs skills. Cole also encloses a letter he sent to President Johnson and Attorney General Ramsey Clark regarding Congress' disregard of "racial discontent."

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Roy Wilkins, Chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the conference's executive committee.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to an upcoming meeting of the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Roy Wilkins, of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, wrote Dr. King to explain his increasing concern over the violence in Nigeria. Wilkins requests Dr. King's presence for a meeting with Nigerian Leaders to discuss the possibilities of ending the hostilities.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to the Honorable Dean Rusk

In this letter, Roy Wikins extends an invitation to Sec. of State, Dean Rusk, to attend a meeting of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter from Taconic Foundation to MLK

Stephen Currier, President of the Taconic Foundation, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting about the development of a new program. Currier lists other individuals who have been invited to serve as consultants and who will provide "an evaluation of Negro gains up to the present."

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

In a letter to Dr. King, Mr. Brown encloses an article pertaining to Nigeria being on the brink of disintegration and civil war.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to Conference Participants

In this letter, Director Theodore E. Brown notifies the conference participants of the rescheduling for the Third National Biennial Leadership.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK

The Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference On Africa sent this letter to update Dr. King and other committee members about plans for the third national biennial leadership conference.

Letter from Victor Sharrow to MLK

Victor Sharrow requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss implementing state and federal plans purportedly suggested by President Johnson. Mr. Sparrow believes that decreasing the number of racist southern representatives will have a collateral affect on southern apportionment of presidential electors.

Letters from Jeanette Allen Behre to MLKCharles. H. Behre to MLK

Two professors of Columbia University, Dr. Jeanette Allen Behre and Chas. H. Behre Jr., express their dissent with Dr. King taking a public stand on the war in Vietnam. The professors feel Dr. King is jeopardizing his support for the civil rights.

March on Washington

In this news release, Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, addresses Congress to voice the people's concern in their quest for freedom, jobs and equal rights. He commends Republicans and Democrats in support of legislation to end discrimination.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Pamphlet

This pamphlet promotes the historic March on Washington of August 28, 1963. The pamphlet calls upon Congress to pass civil rights legislation and end the "twin evils of discrimination and economic deprivation" that plague the nation.

March on Washington Lincoln Memorial Program

This document outlines the program held at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

March to Washington Strategic Planning

This document outlines key strategies concerning the upcoming March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963. The one-day civil rights demonstration intends to bring national attention to the social and economic injustices afflicting millions of American citizens.

Meet the Press Interview with Roy Wilkins and MLK

This document is a transcript of NBC’s “Meet the Press” televised press conference with Dr. King and Roy Wilkins. The program is moderated by Ned Brooks. Frank Van Der Linden, Robert MacNeil, Richard Wilson, and Lawrence Spivak are panelists. Some of the topics covered are the goals of the March on Washington, a concern about whether the Civil Rights Movement is pushing too hard, and past political affiliations of Bayard Rustin.

Memo from Theodore Brown

Mr. Brown informs several African American leaders, including Dr. King, of his attempts to raise funds for the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

Memorandum from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other civil rights leaders of a previous letter to President Johnson regarding United States-Africa relations.

Minutes of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership Meeting

These minutes from the meeting of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership give a description of the topics discussed. Topics included: meeting with President Johnson, Office of Economic Opportunity memoranda, Inter-organizational conflict and fundraising.

MLK Interview: The Negro Protest

Kenneth B. Clark conducts a televised interview with Dr. King, James Baldwin, and Malcolm X. Clark discusses with Dr. King his personal history, the relationship between the love ethic and nonviolent direct action, Malcolm X's claim that nonviolence is perceived by white leaders as weakness, and Baldwin's concern that Negroes will not remain nonviolent if met with brutal responses.

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