Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Wieman, Henry Nelson

b. 1884 - d. 1975

Henry Nelson Wieman, born in Rich Hill, Missouri, was an American religious philosopher influenced by Alfred North Whitehead, the father of process theology. After graduating from San Francisco Theological Seminary and serving a brief period as a Presbyterian minister, Wieman obtained his doctorate from Harvard University. He taught philosophy at Occidental College for 10 years and was professor of Christian theology at the University of Chicago Divinity School from 1927 to 1947. He taught at several other universities and wrote a number of important books, among them The Source of Human Good. As Wieman’s career progressed, his theological views aligned more with the pragmatic naturalism of John Dewey than with Whitehead, and he moved from traditional Christianity to Unitarian-Universalism. Dr. King’s doctoral dissertation at Boston University compared the views of Paul Tillich and Wieman on the nature of God and found them both unsatisfactory.

Associated Archive Content : 26 results

Abstract of MLK's Dissertation "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman"

Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s abstract of his doctoral dissertation in Systematic Theology at Boston University details the fundamental problem of evaluating the concept of God in the philosophical and theological thoughts of Paul Tillich and Nelson Wieman; methods of procedure implemented throughout his research; and his conclusions drawn from the teachings of Tillich and Wieman.

Chapter 1 - Introduction

In this dissertation, Dr. King discusses several investigations and problems. He centers the paper around a comparison of "the conceptions of God in the thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Chapter II - The Methodologies of Tillich and Wieman

This is the third chapter of Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conception of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Chapter IV - Weiman's Conception of God

Dr. King professes his ideas and viewpoints as they relate to Henry Nelson Wieman's theology on God. Wieman, an American philosopher of Naturalistic Religion, believed that God was a natural process rather than a supernatural entity.

Faith As A Way of Knowing (Wieman)

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "The Source of Human Good" on faith as a way of knowing.

God, Knowledge Of (Wieman)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "How Do We Know God?" from the Journal of Religion.

Knowing God (Wieman)

Dr. King notes Henry Nelson Wieman's ideas on how man comes to know God.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

Letter from Tadashi Akaishi to MLK Requesting Permission to Publish MLK's Dissertation

This letter from Tadashi Akaishi to Dr. King requests background information and the rights to publish Dr. King's dissertation.

Methodology (Wieman)

Dr. King outlines the methodology of religious philosopher Henry Wieman.

MLK's Doctoral Dissertation Abstract: A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman

On Using Christian Words

Dr. King references Henry Nelson Wieman's book "On Using Christian Words."

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King writes notes on perceiving God using Nelson Henry Wieman's text, "The Source of Human God."

Religion

Dr. King records a definition of religion from Wieman and Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Religious Education

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Religious Leadership

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Revelation as a Way of Knowing

Dr. King quotes and discusses Henry Nelson Wieman’s view of revelation and knowledge as described in “The Source of Human Good.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Scientific Method

Dr. King discusses the scientific method according to Henry Nelson Wieman's "Issues of Life."

Scientific Method (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s article “Authority and the Normative Approach” in the Journal of Religion for a definition of the scientific method. He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Scientific Method (Wieman)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's "Religious Experience and Scientific Method." He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Scientific Method and God

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman on the knowledge of God being unscientific. The content of this card appears verbatim in King's doctoral dissertation, "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Sin (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s “Normative Psychology of Religion.”

The Christian Way of Life in Human Relations

Dr. King makes a speech to the National Council of Churches regarding the issue of American race relations. After school integration ... has noticed a radical change in the attitudes of African-Americans, ultimately giving birth to this mental and figurative notion of the "new Negro". He solicits the assistance and leadership of the nation's churches to take a firm stand against the rampant inequalities afflicting blacks are facing in America.

The Self

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's book "The Source of Human Good."

Wieman's Empirician

Dr. King records a quote from religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman's book, "The Source of Human Good" on the impossibility of knowing final outcomes.

Worship: A Selected Bibliography

This sixteen-page document lists a bibliography of worship materials dated May of 1941.