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Congress of Racial Equality

In 1942, members of the Fellowship of Reconciliation met at the University of Chicago to discuss how to challenge racism and segregation. Out of these meetings the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) was formed. CORE’s early leaders sought to apply Gandhi’s method of nonviolence in the struggle to end segregation in the U.S. CORE grew to become one of the leading civil rights organizations. CORE pioneered the Freedom Rides, growing from the 1947 Journey of Reconciliation to the 1961 effort that brought an end to discrimination in interstate travel. It was active in the campaigns against discrimination in Chicago public housing. CORE helped organize the 1963 March on Washington and participated in the 1964 Freedom Summer.

Associated Archive Content : 136 results

Letter From Leslie W. Dunbar

Leslie Dunbar outlines information regarding a grant and various agency protocols from the Southern Regional Council for voter registration.

Letter from MLK to Viva O'Dean Sloan

Dr. King responds to Viva O'Dean Sloan's letter, extending his appreciation for her support of the Congress of Racial Equality. He regretfully informs her he does not know of anyone in the Dearborn, Michigan area who might be interested in the purchase of her property there.

Letter from Negro Non-Commissioned Officers to Civil Rights Leaders

The non-commissioned officers of Fort Polk write major civil rights organizations and publications to share their story of segregation and discrimination in the town of Leesville. The authors hope that their letter will be published - exposing the injustices.

Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.

Letter from Percy A. Blackburn to Ed Clayton

Percy A. Blackburn refers to a previous letter Alice Bucher, president of S. J. Bucher Ltd. Lucerne sent Ed Clayton, SCLC Director of Public Relations, concerning their book about the History of the American Negro. Blackburn encloses a "resume of the proposed contents of the book." He also informs Mr. Clayton of Mrs. Bucher and her associate's current visit to the US and that they would like to arrange an appointment with Dr. King at his convenience.

Letter From Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler

Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler sends their support and best wishes to the S.C.L.C, C.O.R.E, and S.N.C.C for their efforts towards violence, Vietnam, and human dignity.

Letter from Robert Green to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

SCLC Education Director Robert Green writes Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach requesting a federal intervention on discrimination practices in Mississippi. Green complains that members of SCLC, SNCC, CORE and other organizations were denied access to restrooms during the 1966 James Meredith March Against Fear.

Letter from SNCC Communication Director Horace Julian Bond to MLK

Horace Bond, writing on behalf of the Council of Federated Organizations, asks Dr. King to join other civil rights organizations in writing a letter to President Johnson to support the organization's bid for a meeting with the President.

Letter from Stephen Goodyear to MLK

Stephen Goodyear expresses appreciation for an inscribed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?", as well as his enthusiasm regarding Dr. King's attendance at the National Conference for New Politics.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Thomas Johnson, a reporter for the New York Times, writes to Dr. King requesting his participation in a symposium to be published in Playboy, regarding the civil rights movement.

Letter from Viva O. Sloam to CORE Members

Viva O. Sloam, sends a letter to members of the Congress for Racial Equality regarding integration in a Kentucky neighborhood.

Letter from Viva Sloan to MLK

Viva O'Dean Sloan commends Dr. King on his efforts, but calls on his support to promote denominational integration of religions.

Letter from Walter G. Pietsch to MLK

Walter G. Peitsch asks Dr. King to support a resolution to reinstate Adam Clayton Powell to his seat in the United States House of Representatives and his Chairmanship of the United States Committee on Education and Labor.

Letter from Weston C. Pullen to MLK

Weston C. Pullen, Vice President for Broadcasting at Time Incorporated, thanks Dr. King for his expedited response and cooperation "in filming a message on civil rights."

Letter from William F. Grant to MLK

After being insulted by a solicitation from the SCLC, William Grant lectures Dr. King on the morality of his methods and strongly disfavors the work of several civil rights groups and the civil rights struggle as a whole.

Letter from William Mallory to MLK

Mr. Mallory writes to Dr. King proposing a national day to be observed by all Negroes. The three purposes of this day are to instill racial pride, demonstrate the contributions of Negroes and to preserve the heritage of American Negroes.

Letter From William N. Goldsmith to MLK

William N. Goldsmith informs Dr. King of funds that were collected at Brandeis University for the SCLC. Mr. Goldsmith also apologizes for Dr. King having to bear so much of the load in Birmingham.

Letter to Wallace Webster from MLK

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Webster's invitation, but informs him that he has decided to commit more time to the civil rights struggle and is unable to accept.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Event Program

This program outlines the events for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C.

March on Washington Lincoln Memorial Program

This document outlines the program held at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

March on Washington Record

Entitled "We Shall Overcome!" this document advertises the selling of the "authorized record" of the 1963 March on Washington. The record includes "inspiring songs of freedom" and speeches from the historical march.

March to Washington Strategic Planning

This document outlines key strategies concerning the upcoming March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963. The one-day civil rights demonstration intends to bring national attention to the social and economic injustices afflicting millions of American citizens.

Mass Meeting Featuring MLK

This document is a program for a mass meeting sponsored by the SCLC and the Raleigh Citizens Association. Dr. King is the principal speaker of this meeting.

Membership Director's Report to CORE Convention

In this report to the members of CORE, Mr. Robinson outlines the goals for acquiring new contributing associate members and keeping the members they have. It is also concerned with increasing the amount of the donations. The report specifically focuses on membership maintenance, recruitment, growth and the impact of holiday cards.

Memo from the American Lutheran Church to Denver Area Pastors

David Brown of the American Lutheran Church sends an article and copy of a letter from a pastor responding to the article to Denver area pastors. The article, published in "Common Sense," depicts Dr. King as a "Marxist tool" and agitator.

Memorandum from James Framer to CORE Group Leaders

Jamer Framer, National Director of CORE, outlines several examples of legal and "extra-legal" harrassment of CORE and Freedom Riders by Mississippi officials.

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Minutes of National Action Council Meeting

The National Action Council, a sector of the Congress of Racial Equality, hosts a regional meeting in Miami, Florida where they will vote on council member positions, as well as regional and national NAC meeting logistics.

Minutes of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership Meeting

These minutes from the meeting of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership give a description of the topics discussed. Topics included: meeting with President Johnson, Office of Economic Opportunity memoranda, Inter-organizational conflict and fundraising.

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

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