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Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano)

b. 1882 - d. 1945

Born to a wealthy family in New York, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was 32nd U.S. president, elected to four terms. He graduated from Harvard College, where he edited The Harvard Crimson. Elected to the New York state senate, Roosevelt served as chairman of the agricultural committee, which familiarized him with labor and social issues. After serving as Assistant U.S. Secretary of the Navy, he contracted polio in 1921. Following two terms as governor of New York, Roosevelt was elected president in 1932. Congress quickly passed his New Deal of economic programs aimed at relief and recovery from the Great Depression. After Japan’s December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, he led the U.S. effort in World War II and supported creation of the United Nations. His civil rights record was limited to establishing the Fair Employment Practices Commission and banning hiring discrimination in the defense industry; however, under his administration, Japanese-Americans were placed in internment camps. Roosevelt died in office from a cerebral hemorrhage.

Associated Archive Content : 17 results

"Negro Rights: Key Dates"

This image depicts the chronological history of laws passed as it pertains to the life and wellbeing of Negros. The first date of reference is January 1st, 1863, the day when slavery was abolished.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

Congressional Record: The President's Housing Bill, or, How To Succeed in Politics Without Really Trying

Senator Charles Percy forwarded this article, published in the Congressional Record, to Dr. King. The article discusses President Johnson's attempted housing referendum, known as the Fair Housing Bill, in March of 1968.

Draft Position Paper on Economic and Fiscal Policy

The basis of this draft paper is about the proposed elimination of poverty in the United States within a ten-year span. A plan called the "Freedom Budget" has been endorsed by the A. Philip Randolph Institute. The premise of this paper is to "carry forward these developments in the economic and fiscal area, setting forth suggested policies which might be supported by all individuals and groups associated" with the goal of eradicating poverty in the United States.

Hints on Religious Music for Radio

This pamphlet, written by Charles Schmitz, acknowledges the impact of music on religious radio. Schmitz maintains that music helps establish the purpose of religious radio programs and that certain musical selections have the power to create Christian mood and comfort. This pamphlet gives instructions on how best to implement music.

Letter from Barry Gray to Jackie Robinson

Barry Gray, an influential American radio personality, writes Jackie Robinson expressing his disappointment with how he dealt with countering issues. According to Gray, Robinson sent a letter to "distinguished Americans, including his friends" and presumably blackmailed him. Gray discusses his input in the Civil Rights Movement through exposing unequal systems through television and radio.

Letter from Francis Stern to MLK

Francis H. Stern, Chairman of the Humanitarian Award Committee, writes Dr. King informing him that he has been selected unanimously to receive the 1964 Brith Sholom Humanitarian Award. Stern points out that past recipients include Eleanor Roosevelt, Thurgood Marshall, Rabbi Stephen Wise, UN secretary general Trygvie Lie, and former Prime Minister of Australia Herbert Evatt.

Letter from MLK to FDR III

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the contribution of $1,000.00 made by Franklin D. Roosevelt III to the SCLC.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Attorney General Robert Kennedy invites Dr. King to be interviewed as part of an oral history program on issues and decisions of the Kennedy Administration.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Robert Kennedy writes Dr. King requesting to interview him for an oral history program on the Kennedy Administration. Kennedy asserts, "You are obviously one of the persons who ought to be interviewed in order to get a full record of the Administration."

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

William Kivi forwards Dr. King a copy of a postcard addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The correspondence alleges that the riots occuring in urban cities are a result of a economic stronghold to keep, in Kivi's view, "oppressing the oppressed." Kivi uses an example of California Governor Ronald Reagan's proposal to nix any federal program that supplements the War on Poverty.

Letter to Franklin D. Roosevelt Regarding Discrimination In Employment

In this letter, Fred Poellnitz writes Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding his inability to obtain a job with the U.S. government. He claims that it is due to discrimination in employment.

Myths and Facts About OEO

This document lists myths and facts regarding the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Scripps Howard: Dr. King Asks LBJ to Do As Hero FDR Did

Tom Talburt reports in this article that Dr. King urged President Johnson to create jobs and provide for the disadvantaged in order to prevent another summer of riots, such as the Los Angeles Watts Riots of 1965.

Telegram to MLK Regarding Honor Group MLK

In this telegram, sponsor Virginia Price Principal Clarence Fitch write to Dr. King to see if they can name Honor Group Martin Luther King a chapter of the National Junior Honor Society, at Roosevelt Junior High in Cleveland.

The Nation: Fumbling on the New Frontier by MLK

Dr. King elaborates on a report regarding civil rights and the collective efforts with the Kennedy Administration to eradicate racial discrimination. The Executive Orders from President Kennedy are unprecedented as he is attempting to eliminate employment discrimination and has appointed Negroes to key government positions. In an effort not to move "too fast," the President's legislative programs have now commenced a pace that is parallel with the consensus. Dr.