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Randolph, A. Philip (Asa Philip)

b. 1889 - d. 1979

Born in Crescent City, Florida, Asa Philip Randolph was a labor organizer and civil rights activist. He moved to Harlem in 1911 and joined the Socialist Party, publicly opposing World War I. From 1925 to 1935, Randolph led the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first successful black trade union. His call for a March on Washington in 1941 to protest refusal to hire black workers prodded President Roosevelt to ban discrimination in the defense industry. His appeal for civil disobedience against conscription into the segregated armed forces influenced President Truman to desegregate the military in 1948. A vice president of the AFL-CIO, he helped found the Negro American Labor Council. Randolph mobilized significant union support for the civil rights movement and chaired the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. In 1964, President Lyndon Johnson awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Associated Archive Content : 96 results

"Black Power" and Coalition Politics

The September 1966 issue of Commentary, a monthly publication of the American Jewish Committee, features Bayard Rustin's article "Black Power and Coalition Politics." The article discusses topics such as black power, the liberal labor civil rights coalition, the strategies of Marcus Garvey, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington, and A. Philip Randolph's Freedom Budget. Rustin states that although black power is viewed as a "psychological rejection of white supremacy" those advocating for black power are seeking a "new black establishment."

"DuBois State Memorial Proposed; Would Be in Great Barrington"

William F. Bell writes an article concerning a proposed W. E. Dubois State Memorial in Great Barrington.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Orientation Agenda

This document outlines the schedule of events during the A. Philip Randolph Institute orientation, an organization focused on racial equality and economic justice.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Memorandum

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, provides a progress report on ANLCA's work on Nigeria, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Southwest Africa (now Namibia). He mentions that the group offered to help the Nigerian federal government and the four regions mediate the conflict that resulted in the Nigeria-Biafra Civil War (1967-1970).

An Appeal from MLK to Negro and White Men of Goodwill

Dr. King discusses the impact that segregated schooling has on Negro children. He urges Negro and "white men of goodwill" to join together in the fight for the integration of schools.

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

Bayard Rustin: Right to Work Laws

This booklet, written chiefly by Bayard Rustin, suggests that the "Right to Work" laws handicap minorities in the American workforce. The "Right to Work" law is a statute that bans union security agreements, which Rustin posits is undemocratic and assists in exploiting and perpetuating American poverty.

Cloudy Summit

In this article, Mr. Randolph organizes a conference of Negro leaders to take action in the suspension case of Rep. Adam Clayton Powell.

Community Salute to MLK Nobel Peace Prize Winner

This program outlines an event to celebrate Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. The event takes place in New York City on December 17, 1964.

Congressional Record Regarding Antipoverty Funding

This Congressional Record documents a statement regarding the antipoverty bill. The statement, made to the public by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urged Congress to support funding towards eradicating poverty for both black and white citizens.

Draft Position Paper on Economic and Fiscal Policy

The basis of this draft paper is about the proposed elimination of poverty in the United States within a ten-year span. A plan called the "Freedom Budget" has been endorsed by the A. Philip Randolph Institute. The premise of this paper is to "carry forward these developments in the economic and fiscal area, setting forth suggested policies which might be supported by all individuals and groups associated" with the goal of eradicating poverty in the United States.

Four Top Rights Leaders Considering Africa Trip

Roy Wilkins, Dr. King, Whitney Young, and A. Philip Randolph, four of America's top civil rights leaders, are considering making a trip to Africa to stop the war in Nigeria. These leaders also serve as members on the call committee of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Help For Nigeria

Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.

Invitation to Emergency Convocation: The Urban Coalition

This letter from Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph invites Dr. King to attend the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition, to address the issue of violence in 104 cities. The goals set forth in the letter include an emergency work program, a major expansion of the private sector for job provision and training, and establishment of a long-range program for the physical and social reconstruction of American cities.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King to make a tribute for Norman Thomas' eightieth birthday celebration.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Dr. King is invited by A. Philip Randolph to attend a birthday party for well known Presbyterian minister, socialist and pacifist Norman Thomas. Randolph requests that Dr. King participate as a sponsor for Thomas' birthday celebration.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK about a Contribution

In this letter A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King for contributions needed to carry out the work of the National Advisory Committee On Farm Labor (NACFL). Randolph states, "NACFL stretches its limited funds far, but now at this critical point we must ask for your support".

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to President Lyndon Johnson

A. Philip Randolph, the President of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (an AFL-CIO affiliate), writes to President Johnson to urge him to convene a small group of national civil rights leaders to advise local leaders and businessmen on how to deal with the escalation of riots occurring all over the country.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Mr. Randolph addresses his concerns with current events that could potentially harm the Civil Rights Movement. His list of developments includes Malcolm X's promotion of rifle clubs, the use of propaganda tactics to separate white people from the Civil Rights Movement, the increasing totalitarian influence on protest groups in northern cities and demagogic leadership that creates confusion and frustration. Mr. Randolph requests a meeting to discuss how to address these issues.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

A. Philip Randolph writes Dr. King requesting that he join as a sponsor in the campaign to decrease customers of the two chief banks supporting apartheid in South Africa.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

A. Phillip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, writes to Dr. King enclosing a letter to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Mr. Randolph addresses concerns of nationwide rioting in retaliation to social and economic oppression.

Letter from Abby Seldes to MLK

Young Abby Seldes writes Dr. King to inform him of how inspirational his words are. Seldes mentions that she is a 12-years-old from Pennsylvania and an avid supporter of Dr. King's leadership. She also discusses her parents' participation in the March on Washington.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK

Asbury Howard, Vice President of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of the harassment and attacks their union has endured for several years. He explains the 1949 indictment of officers from the union on charges of "falsely signing non-Communist affidavits." The case was dormant until government brought the case to trial in 1959 during a strike of 40,000 allied worker and copper miners. Howard cites this as evidence of union busting. He requests Dr. King's commentary and encloses a pamphlet regarding the case.

Letter from Assistant Deputy Attorney General William A. Geoghegan to MLK

William Geoghegan, Assistant Deputy Attorney General, thanks Dr. King for his telegram recommending L. N. D. Wells, Jr. to the Fifth Circuit of the United States Court of Appeals.

Letter from Bea Lazar to Dora McDonald

Bea Lazar thanks Miss McDonald for sending a copy of a recent speech given by Dr. King. She praises the speech as a lesson that Americans "sorely need." She also encloses a contribution to the SCLC as a Christmas present.

Letter from Charlie Cheese Carsons to Rev. Andrew Young

Charlie Cheese Carsons addresses Rev. Andrew Young to provide him with a painting that expresses the Civil Rights Movement and the fight for human dignity. Mr. Carsons is aware that Dr. King's attention has more important concerns which explains his reasoning for contacting Rev. Young. In addition to the painting, Mr. Carsons attaches his perceptions of prominent African Americans who served as his inspiration.

Letter from Edward Rutledge and Jack Wood to Robert Weaver

Edward Rutledge and Jack E. Wood Jr. represent the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, Center for Fair Housing. They expound on housing, planning policies, and programs for New York City. In addition, they affirm their belief that policy-makers should include and reflect the concerns of the minority.

Letter from Griffin R. Simmons to MLK

Griffin R. Simmons, President of The Consolidate Association, responds to Dr. King's letter of recent date stating that he was chosen to be honored by the Consolidate Association. Simmons hopes that Dr. King can make an appearance at the Fall Affair, and requests him to make a statement which will appear in their journal.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to Charles W. Englehard

Harry Wachtel writes Charles Englehard thanking him for his payment of $5,000 toward a $15,000 pledge to The American Foundation On Nonviolence. He states that his initial contribution was extremely helpful in registering African Americans in Mississippi and other southern states.

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