Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Peter, the Apostle, Saint

Associated Archive Content : 8 results

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Desegregation and the Future

This document contains the first eight pages of Dr. King's address at the annual luncheon of the National Committee for Rural Schools at New York's Commodore Hotel in 1956. In it, he condemns segregation as an evil which has been allowed to exist in American life for too many decades. Dr. King points out that many states now stand in opposition to desegregation, and the federal government and the Supreme Court must now face how to make this new legislation a reality.

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.

Letter from Roger Dunloff, Jr. to MLK

Due to his inability to contribute financially, Roger G. Dunloff offers his prayers and moral support to Dr. King and the SCLC.

Peter Denied His Lord, And Cryed

Sam Bradley, from Friends Journal, composes a poem illustrating Saint Peter's denial of Jesus.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Standing By The Best in an Evil Time" E

In this sermon, Dr. King addresses the evil in the world and suggest to his congregation that they counter this by being strong and steadfast in the Lord. Dr. King also touches on the current issues in society and how to continue the use of nonviolence as means to for peace and social justice.

The Gospel and How We Love Our Enemies

John C. Heidbrink sets forth the notion that in order to be a disciple of Christ, in any age, one must express unconditional love "toward him who seeks to destroy us," irrespective of differences in personal, national, or religious sentiments.