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Nehru, Jawaharlal

b. 1889 - d. 1964

Born to a lawyer-politician in Allahabad, British India, Jawaharlal Nehru was the first prime minister of independent India from 1947 to 1964. He was educated in England at Trinity College, Cambridge and studied law at the Inner Temple in London. After returning to India in 1912 to practice law, Nehru became active in Gandhi’s civil disobedience campaigns and joined the Indian National Congress. He succeeded Gandhi as president of the Congress party in 1928. Arrested repeatedly for civil disobedience, he spent more than 9 years in jail. As prime minister, Nehru implemented socialist economic reforms and began industrialization. He also served as foreign minister, steering a course of non-alignment in international affairs. His daughter Indira Gandhi became prime minister of India following her father’s death. Dr. King, inspired by Nehru’s leadership, sent him an inscribed copy of Stride Toward Freedom. They met during King’s February 1959 trip to India.

Associated Archive Content : 10 results

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Article on Prime Minister Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru

Gandhi Smarak Nidhi: Its Work and Plans Booklet

This booklet contains information on initiatives being brought to fruition by the Gandhi National Memorial Fund. Dr. and Mrs. King appear in a photo on page eight.

Letter from Angie Elizabeth Shelton to MLK

Mrs. Shelton expresses her gratitude to Dr. King for renewing her faith. After reading one of Dr. King's books, she states that she felt herself beginning to believe. Mrs. Shelton has decided to buy and study "Civil Disobedience" thanks to Dr. King.

Letter from Edwin Hoffman to MLK

West Virginia State College invites Dr. King to address the American Affairs Forum and provides him with select dates to choose from. The college has extended an appreciation for various prime ministers, presidents, attorney generals, and other political figures for their support. Dr. King is congratulated from the college from the receipt of the Nobel Piece Prize.

Letter from K. Natwar Singh to MLK

K. Natwar Singh requests an appearance by Dr. King for the upcoming non-profit event honoring the late Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. With the publication of the memorial, Singh requests that Dr. King also write a tribute. Attached to the letter is an example entitled "I Too Have Seen."

Letter from Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti to MLK

The Indian organization, Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti, expresses admiration of Dr. King's heroic struggle for civil rights in the US, along with his application of Mahatma Gandhi's methods. A bronze bust of Gandhi is offered as a gift of appreciation and a request made for placement of the statue in a children's park.

Men of Past and Present Pamphlet

This pamphlet features quotes 'Men of Past and Present,' including religious and political leaders, on democracy and cooperatives.

MLK Statement Before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

Dr. King makes a public statement before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder. He addresses five causes of the recent riots: hite backlash, unemployment, discriminatory practices, war, and features peculiar to big cities.

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.