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McDonald, Dora E.

b. 1925 - d. 2007

Dora Edith McDonald attended South Carolina State College. After graduation she worked as secretary for Benjamin Mays, president of Morehouse College. In 1960 Dr. King hired her as his personal secretary, a position she held until his death. Working from Ebenezer Baptist Church and then the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) office, McDonald typed King’s manuscripts and sermons, took telephone calls, organized his speaking engagements and often traveled with him. She was his confidante, sounding board and close family friend. McDonald traveled with the Kings to Oslo for the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony and informed Mrs. King of her husband’s assassination. From 1972 to 1977 she worked for Andrew Young in his congressional office, taking a job with IBM when Young was appointed United Nations ambassador. Her memoir Sharing the Dream: Martin Luther King, Jr., the Movement, and Me was published in 2007.

Associated Archive Content : 454 results

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dick Smyth

Dora McDonald informs Dick Smyth that Dr. King is unable to accept the speaking engagement at the moment but they will contact him once Dr. King has an engagement in the area.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dolly Davis

Dora McDonald informs Dolly Davis that Dr. King is absent from the city and they're looking forward to receiving the galleys to "the New World of Negro Americans" by Harold Isaacs.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Benjamin E. Mays that Dr. King will attend the Morehouse Board of Trustees luncheon.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Edward A. Jones

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Edward Jones of Morehouse College, asking him to translate the enclosed letter for Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Edward A. Jones

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Edward Jones to thank him for translating the letter from Mr. Wasalu for Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. J. M. Douglas

Miss McDonald informs Dr. J. M. Douglas that she has discussed his invitation with Dr. King and that it will be placed in a special folder for further correspondence when there is availability in Dr. King's schedule.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. James Halsey

Dora McDonald sends, at Dr. King's request, a check to Dr. James Halsey.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. James P. Dixon of Antioch College

Dora McDonald writes Dr. James Dixon to express Dr. King's joy in his ability to accept Dr. Dixon's invitation to speak at Antioch College's commencement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Marcel L. Goldschmid about a Book

In this letter Dora McDonald informs Dr. M.L. Goldschmid that Dr. King will be unable to write the foreword for his book due to an already filled schedule.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Richard C. Gilman

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Gilman that Dr. King will be able to speak at Occidental College on November 17, 1966.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. W. A. Visser't Hooft

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Hooft confirming that Dr. King accepts his invitation to speak in Geneva. McDonald inquires about expenses for Dr. King and one of his aids and encloses a photograph and biography for Dr. Hooft to utilize.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. William H. Gray, Jr.

Dora McDonald responds, on behalf of Dr. King, to Dr. William H. Gray, Jr. letter of April 20, 1966 regarding an invitation to speak at the Baptist Ministers Conference.

Letter from Dora McDonald to E. M. Bettenson

Dr. King is visiting Newcastle, England to receive an honorary degree from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Bettenson of Dr. King's schedule and requirements so that the staff can prepare accordingly.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eartha Kitt

Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald commends actress Eartha Kitt for speaking "as a woman, among women.” Responding to a question by the First Lady at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, Kitt linked youth violence to the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edith Segal

Dora McDonald communicates to Edith Segal that she has be referred to the letter addressed originally to Bernard Lee. Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Segal that Dr. King is unable to comment on her book due to his consistent traveling endeavors in the South for the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edwin Fenton

Ms. McDonald is responding to the letter requesting permission of the use of Dr. King's speeches. The permission was granted to the Carnegie Institute of Technology. If any other services were needed then SCLC would be at their disposal.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eleanor H. Allen

Dora McDonald responds to a letter from Eleanor Allen regarding assisting a church affected by recent bombings. McDonald encloses the address of Reverend John Cross, Pastor of 16th Baptist Church, in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eliot Stadler

Dora McDonald communicates the traveling details to Eliot Stadler regarding his temporary staff placement in the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elisabeth Babcock

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Elisabeth Babcock regarding the possibility of Dr. King visiting her in New York. Unfortunately, the hectic schedule in Dr. King's travels will not allow him such an opportunity. She conveys their gratitude for the "moral and financial support" Babcock has made for the betterment of the movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elizabeth Babcock

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Babcock that she received the contribution for the SCLC on behalf of Dr. King. Miss McDonald tells Mrs. Babcock that Dr. King is imprisoned in Selma, Alabama and that he will respond upon his release.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Erik Ruden

Dora McDonald informs Erik Ruden that Dr. King will only be able to speak twice during his upcoming trip to London and that an associate will need to travel with Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Dora McDonald writes Ernest Shaefer on behalf of Dr. King to inform him that Dr. King will write him regarding his invitation in the future. She also asks Mr. Shaefer to inform them of the exact date of the meeting and travel expenses for Dr. King and his associate.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Shaefer that Dr. King will be able to speak in Kennett Square in Pennsylvania.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

In this letter, Ms. McDonald encloses biographical sketches to accompany Dr. King's lecture, "The Future of Integration."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Essie M. Perry

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Essie M. Perry to discuss Dr. King's availability to speak at Lane College for the 50th Anniversary of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Dr. King informs Mrs. McDonald that his schedule is too strenuous to engage into this wonderful opportunity.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ethel Sebastian

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Sebastian that Dr. King will make inquiries about her father when he returns to Albany and hopes the two will reunite soon.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ethelyn L. Hall

Miss McDonald sends Ethelyn Hall information that Dr. King thinks Hall will find helpful.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eugene Exman about MLK

Ms. McDonald writes Harper & Brothers executive to confirm receipt of his letter to Dr. King dated June 19, 1961 requesting a proposed timeline for the completion of a forthcoming book. Ms. McDonald reassures Harper and Brothers that Dr. King is adhering to the request and will take five weeks off to ensure completion.

Letter from Dora McDonald to F. Newton Miller

In Dr. King's absence, Dora McDonald writes F. Newton Miller concerning Dr. King's appearance in Rockville Centre on February 21. McDonald encloses a copy of a letter sent to Mrs. Rose R. Silvers of the Rockville Centre Commission to clarify the misunderstanding.

Letter from Dora McDonald to F.A. Guilford

Dora McDonald expresses Dr. King's delight in knowing that F.A. Guilford of Oxford University Press wants to reprint the "Letter from Birmingham Jail." However, she informs Guilford that, due to the letter already being published, it is impossible for a reprint. McDonald refers Guilford to contact Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, for more information.

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