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King, Martin Luther, Jr.

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Albany Manifesto

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

Albany Movement Support Letter from MLK to Rev. Hugh Wire

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Reverend Wire for his participation in the Albany Movement.

All Local 1 Members Invited

All Local 1 members are invited to hear Dr. King discussing the intricacies of "The Summer Project."

Along This Way: The Violence of Poverty

In his regular column of the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the rate of unemployment among Negroes. He states that 2/3 of all Negro families live in poverty. Dr. King argues that the administration needs to carry out the mandate of the Unemployment Act of 1945 and stimulate employment.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Public Meeting

Dr. King is listed as the keynote speaker for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Forty-First Boule on August 10, 1964.

America

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's view in "The Irony of American History" that "the paradise of domestic security is suspended in a hell of global insecurity."

America

Dr. King quotes a statement from American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regarding the country's "historic situation in which the paradise of domestic security is suspended in a hell of global insecurity."

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

In this 1967 speech to the Hungry Club, Dr. King addresses America’s chief moral dilemma by focusing on three major evils: racism, poverty, and war.

American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief

The American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief requests that Dr. King join them in sending medical supplies to North Vietnam. They also explain the difficulties they are receiving from the government to obtain a Treasury Department License which would enable them to assist in the war relief. Lastly, the committee informs Dr. King of how other churches have made generous contributions to help with relief for the Vietnam War.

American Foundation on Nonviolence

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

American Labor Problems

In an assessment of American labor,Dr. King poses the question, "are we as concerned for human values and human resources as we are for material and mechanical values?" Furthermore, he declares the necessity of legislative, political, and social action to rectify such failings of American society.

American Negro Corporation Plan

This document is a plan created by Sterling B. Conaway. The purpose was to create a business organization for Negro professionals to invest in their future. This document also outlines the purpose and priorities of the organization.

American Negro in the Field of Industrial Relations

This survey is an enclosure of a letter from Alfred L.J. Gunn to Dr. King. Entitled "The Negro in Personnel and Industrial Relations," the survey was conducted using interviews with American people involved in Industrial Relations. Through asking a series of questions to sixty participants, it is concluded that "the future of the American Negro in the field of Industrial Relations is expanding greatly."

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Memorandum

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, provides a progress report on ANLCA's work on Nigeria, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Southwest Africa (now Namibia). He mentions that the group offered to help the Nigerian federal government and the four regions mediate the conflict that resulted in the Nigeria-Biafra Civil War (1967-1970).

Amsterdam News Article by MLK About European Tour

Dr. King recalls an address he gave at the Berlin Arts Festival, where he witnessed an enthusiastic crowd. The crowd's interest confirmed his belief "that the Negro is now in a position to lead the world." He also mentions the Christians of East Berlin, who, though Communists, maintain their faith in God.

Amsterdam News: The Measure of A Man - Jackie Robinson

Dr. King describes his interpretation on the life and efforts of Jackie Roosevelt Robinson to further the cause of Social Justice in America.

Amsterdam News: The Terrible Cost of the Ballot

Dr. King excites public confidence towards the Civil Rights Movement by describing a devastating occurrence.

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

An Ambitious Dream Confronts Reality

Dr. King talks about the Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE) as well as the political changes that have occurred in Georgia.

An Analysis of the Ethical Demands of Integration

Dr. King argues that desegregation is only the first step towards the ultimate goal of complete racial equality. He explains that nonviolence, driven by the power of love, is crucial to create true integration.

An Appeal from MLK to Negro and White Men of Goodwill

Dr. King discusses the impact that segregated schooling has on Negro children. He urges Negro and "white men of goodwill" to join together in the fight for the integration of schools.

An Edition of the SCLC Newsletter

This April/May 1964 SCLC newsletter highlights the recent accomplishments of the SCLC and its members. Some of the topics discussed are the 50-mile march from Selma to Montgomery, Ben Hooks' recent judicial appointment, and Dr. King being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

An Evaluation of the Racial Problems of Chicago

The writer of this document examines the intended efforts of Dr. King and the SCLC in addressing the issues of poor urban conditions, unemployment, unequal education and lack of Negro political involvement in the City of Chicago.

An Evening of Negro Culture and History

This booklet, entitled "Black is Beautiful and It's So Beautiful To Be Black," contains information from an SCLC event held August 16, 1967 that sought to explore Negro culture and history.

An Interview With MLK

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

An Invitation to a Dedication by Olivet and Her Friends

Olivet Institutional Baptist Church sponsors a month long dedication to the opening of the O. M. Hoover Christian Community Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. King is listed as a participant in the dedication.

An Order For the Baptism of Adults

Dr. King outlines the order of the baptism service, including specific phrases for the minister to use.

Anabaptists

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding the Anabaptists and the religious philosophy of the group.

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