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Jones, Clarence

b. 1931

Clarence B. Jones was a key advisor and speechwriter for Dr. King, helping King draft the I Have a Dream speech. He secretly carried from the jail the handwritten notes King wrote that became the Letter from Birmingham Jail. Born the son of domestic workers in Philadelphia, Jones graduated from Columbia University after serving in the army and in 1959 earned a law degree from Boston University School of Law. In 1960 Jones joined the team of lawyers that successfully defended King during his tax fraud trial. He served as legal counsel for the Gandhi Society for Human Rights, the fund-raising arm of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). Jones was part of King’s intimate circle of friends and continued to function as his lawyer and personal counsel through the remainder of King’s life.

Associated Archive Content : 25 results

American Foundation on Nonviolence Board Meeting

Harry W. Wachtel reports the minutes of the American Foundation of Nonviolence Board Meeting held in New York City, New York.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to Dora McDonald

Clarence B. Jones writes Dora McDonald to inform her of his travel plans to Los Angeles, California.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to the Editor of New York Times

Clarence Jones writes the editor of the New York Times to comment on a statement made by James Reston. According to Mr. Jones the statement was factually inaccurate and partially paraphrased.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

This letter announces that the Gandhi Society for Human Rights, Incorporated is sponsoring a benefit concert, for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, at Carnegie Hal,l in New York City. Harry Belafonte, Frank Sinatra and Lena Horne are listed as some of the spotlight performers for this concert.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Clarence Jones writes Dr. King requesting commentary concerning "The World March Towards Human Rights: Luncheon on May 28, 1964."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Mendelson regarding I Have A Dream

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Cantor Mendelson that Dr. King is pleased to know that the Men's Club of Beth Sholom is interested in setting to music excerpts from "I Have a Dream." McDonald refers Mendelson to Clarence Jones, an attorney who handles such matters.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to Attorney Clarence Jones

Irwin Heilner asks Dr. King's attorney for permission to use the "I Have a Dream" speech in one of his songs. He mentions that he previously used words from Langston Hughes in a song on a 50 percent basis and would like the same agreement for the use of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to MLK

Music composer Irwin Heilner corresponds with Dr. King inquiring about the possibility of composing music and setting it to King's "I Have A Dream" speech.

Letter from J. Saba to Clarence B. Jones

"In this the blackest hour of our nation...," J. Saba refers to the assassination of Dr. King. Saba speaks to the urgency to preserve the "American Dream", in light of Dr. King's untimely death. He offers two fitting suggestions: first to establish a MLK, Jr. Memorial Library on Non-Violence and Civil Rights and second to erect a MLK, Jr. Interfaith Chapel at Morehouse College.

Letter From Joan Daves to Clarence B. Jones

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Clarence B. Jones about the carbon of the letter sent to Dr. King regarding an excerpt from "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding the "Times"

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, provided a detailed advertisement schedule for his latest book "Why We Can't Wait." Advertisements appeared in the Times, Harper, The Atlantic, Christian Herald and the Christian Century to name a few.

Letter From Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves writes Dr. King to inform him of her meeting, in Germany, with publishers before the Frankfurt Bookfair.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about Speaking Out Article

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, communicates with Mr. Hunt of Speaking Out regarding payment and schedule of a feature article to be written by Dr. King.

Letter from Kathy Boudin to MLK

Conference Coordinator Kathy Boudin invites Dr. King to participate in a three-day conference held by the students of Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Queen Fields

Dr. King advises Mrs. Queen Field to contact Mr. Clarence Jones to obtain support for her children.

Letter from Mr. Raymond F. Gregory to MLK

In this letter dated 2/28/1962, Mr. Raymond F. Gregory of a New York City law firm writes to Dr. King regarding legal considerations for the "Ghandi [sic] Foundation."

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK about Potential Publishers

This letter, dated 4/6/65, from Ms. Daves to Dr. King, discusses possible courses of action concerning various elements wanting to publish selections of Dr. King's work. These elements are competing and, in some cases, conflicting. Ms. Daves mentions an upcoming conference in which another matter would be discussed in addition to these.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

In this letter to Miss McDonald, Ms. Daves discusses a request for Dr. King to write a short introduction to William Bradford Huie's work "Three Lives for Mississippi". Ms. Daves stresses the importance of this opportunity as it addresses a topic "very much on Dr. King's mind," namely the starting of a "dialogue...between the two opposing forces."

Letter of Response from Clarence B. Jones to J. Saba Alexander

Clarence Jones responds to Alexander's letter requesting action steps to create an interfaith chapel and memorial library in honor of Dr. King. Jones agrees with the great loss and likewise pledges to continue the work.

Memo from Clarence Jones to MLK

Clarence Jones sends Dr. King an article regarding the increasing number of blacks being elected into local governments in the Deep South. Also included is in article informing readers that Jones has been named partner in a member firm of the New York Stock Exchange.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King, along with others, that the Detroit News will run installments for "Why We Cant Wait." They are also told that the copyright will be in Dr. King's name and that credit will be given to Harper and NAL.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK, Clarence Jones and Stanley Levison

Joan Daves expresses the importance of gaining proper copyright reassignment for Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Request to Use "I Have a Dream" Speech in a Musical Composition

Classical composer Irwin Heilner requests Dr. King's permission to sample the "I Have a Dream" speech in a musical work. Heilner specifies his plans to send the song to musicians in order to get it published, and outlines the terms of the royalties if it is successful. The notes at the bottom of the letter indicate that Dr. King referred Heilner to attorney Clarence Jones regarding use of the speech.

Telegram from Berry Gordy, Jr. to MLK

President of Motown Record Corporation, Berry Gordy, Jr., awaits Dr. King's decision on the album, "The Great March on Washington."

Unsigned Memo to Arthur Shores

In this memo to Mr. Shores, the author wants to get an update status on eight clients that served sentences in Birmingham for parading without a permit. Dr. King was sent a copy of the memo.