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Javits, Jacob K. (Jacob Koppel)

b. 1904 - d. 1986

Jacob Javits, lawyer and liberal Republican, represented New York in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1947 to 1955 and the U.S. Senate from 1957 to 1981. The son of Russian Jewish immigrants, he graduated from Columbia University and New York University School of Law. A progressive and an opponent of discrimination, Javits was an advocate of worker’s rights, civil rights and ending immigration quotas. In addition to fighting to end poll taxes and pass the Civil Rights Acts, Javits sponsored the first African American Senate page in 1965. He called for a peaceful solution to the conflict in Vietnam, prompting him to sponsor the 1973 War Powers Act. In 1978, Javits facilitated the discussion between President Carter, Israel and Egypt that resulted in the Camp David Accords. He received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1983.

Associated Archive Content : 17 results

Christianity and Crisis: April 3, 1967

Roger L. Shinn wrote this article for Christianity and Crisis: A Christian Journal of Opinion. Shinn defines a "conscientious objector" as one who believes a war morally unjustifiable, and chooses, therefore, not to serve in it. Several Christian organizations attempted to introduce legislation banning forced participation. The American Civil Liberties Union has encouraged the selective service system to recognize a policy "under which no person shall be compelled to participate in armed conflict when he believes it to be in violation of his conscience."

Editor of The Nation Offers Unsolicited Advice

The editor of The Nation solicits Dr. King's annual article for the next publication. This year, McWilliams suggests that Dr. King expand beyond the usual update on the civil rights agenda. He then offers advice that King consider moving to New York, where the political environment is right for promoting ambitious programs and his leadership ability would be able to shine.

Letter from David E. McGuire to All Members of First Westminster Presbyterian Church

The Session of the First Westminster Presbyterian Church, Yonkers, NY urges a "write-in" campaign to federal, state, or municipal legislators requesting action in the areas of open housing, equal employment opportunities and civil rights.

Letter from Edward J. Warren to Senator Jacob K Javits

Mr. Warren writes to Senator Javits to confirm receipt of a previous correspondence. He expresses gratitude for Javits position on Human Rights.

Letter from Jacob Javits to MLK

Senator Jacob Javits expresses his gratitude for an inscribed book that Dr. King sent him.

Letter from Katharine Gunning to President Johnson

Katharine Gunning of New York writes President Johnson and copies various dignitaries, including Dr. King. Gunning voices her opposition to the Vietnam War, in particular the bombing campaign, which she views as an escalation of the war.

Letter from Mrs. Robert Hall to MLK

Mrs. Hall suggests a letter writing campaign for young people as a more effective and less intimidating means of demonstrating than petitions and marches.

Letter from Senator Jacob Javits to MLK

Senator Javits writes Dr. King to thank him for reaching out to him in need of funds for the SCLC. Mr. Javits then encloses a small contribution and apologizes for not being able to contribute more.

New York Times: Johnson Asks $75 Million for Poverty Projects

This article, written by Joseph A. Loftus for the New York Times, discusses President Johnson's appeal to Congress for $75 Million for anti-poverty summer programs. Johnson's previous request for $1.6 Billion for the War on Poverty had been granted, and these additional funds would provide for pools, day care, and summer programs for areas of extreme poverty, particularly in the Delta of Mississippi. Senators Joseph Clark and Jacob Kavits, of Pennsylvania and New York, respectively, also appeal for anti-poverty funds.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1963

This issue of the SCLC Newsletter covers the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The publication features a number of photographs, editorials and the full text of Dr. King's Washington address.

Shriver Outlines Summer Program

This New York Times article reports that if Congress approves the $75 million supplemental appropriation for antipoverty programs, Sargent Shriver, director of the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, plans to use $47 million for the Neighborhood Youth Corps and $25 for community action agencies to help provide youth with employment and recreation. It also mentions efforts in the Senate to increase the supplemental appropriation.

Statement from Walter E. Fauntroy Regarding the Progress of Urban Renewal and Redevelopment

Walter E. Fauntroy, chairman of the Housing and Urban Renewal Committee of the Interdenominational Ministers' Alliance, makes a statement regarding the progress of urban renewal and redevelopment in Washington, D.C. He discusses five steps for a unified approach to meeting the communities housing problems. Two notable steps include full and effective citizen's participation in all community plans, and adequate and humane solutions in rehousing all families.

Telegram from Jacob K. Javits to MLK

Amidst the confusion of varying interpretations, Senator Jacob K. Javits asks Dr. King to share his interpretation of the term "black power," so that it can serve as a guide to others.

Telegram from MLK to Nicholas Biddle

Dr. King apologizes to Nicholas Biddle for being unable to attend the testimonial for Senator Jacob Javits.

The Negro In America: What Must Be Done

In a full page of letters to the editor, civil rights advocates praise the Newsweek cover issue on the Negro in America for its analysis of the racial crisis and editorial recommendations for an emergency national program of action.

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

The Urban Coalition

The Urban Coalition's weekly report from the National Coordinator details the newly introduced bill which provides $150 million for summer jobs and anti-poverty programs. The report further discusses the monetary inadequacies for programs involving employment, education, and recreation. A proposal is established by the Office of Economic Opportunity to adhere to the summer programs.