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Hoover, J. Edgar (John Edgar)

b. 1895 - d. 1972

J. Edgar Hoover served as the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for 48 years, from 1924 to 1972. Serving eight U.S. presidents, he ran the Bureau throughout the years of the Civil Rights Movement. Hoover’s FBI often responded that it had no authority to investigate lynchings, yet it conducted investigations on thousands involved in the civil rights and peace movements, including Dr. King. Hoover’s Counter Intelligence Program (COINTELPRO) intentionally disseminated false information about those deemed to be threats to national security. With authorization from Attorney General Robert Kennedy, Hoover wiretapped Dr. King’s home and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference office from 1963 to 1968. Hoover also placed microphones in King’s hotel rooms. The FBI did occasionally act in defense of civil rights, as in the investigation of the murders of three civil rights workers in Mississippi.

Associated Archive Content : 12 results

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.

Fact Sheet on the Raid of the SCEF

This document highlights the raid on the New Orleans headquarters of the Southern Conference Educational Fund by State and City Police.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Letter from FBI Director John Edgar Hoover to MLK

J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, thanks Dr. King for his telegram regarding the work of Special Agents of the Bureau in Alabama.

Letter from J. Edgar Hoover to MLK

J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, sends his thanks for Dr. King's telegram concerning the recent work of FBI agents in Alabama.

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to All Law Enforcement Officials

In this letter, President Hoover addresses all F.B.I. law enforcement officials. He discusses America's opposition to communism and describes it as an "insidious menace." However, Hoover warns that "attributing every adversity to communism" is ineffective and senseless. Instead he suggests that in order to defeat communism, it must be thoroughly studied and analyzed.

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to MLK

FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover thanks Dr. King for his telegram concerning FBI agents in Alabama.

Redbook: The Police

In this article from Redbook magazine, Sam Blum informs readers that policemen are not only "crime fighters" but also are expected to be skilled in numerous other areas as well. He exposes the FBI's often inaccurate assessment of the cost of crime and states that this is an effort to keep the public in fear and generate increased funding. Blum discusses the different experiences of the middle class and slum-dwellers, the perception of police brutality, and the need for professionalized training.

Telegram to MLK from John Jacobs

John Jacobs accuses Dr. King of being associated with Communists. He proclaims that Negroes learned raping, robbing and relief with Dr. King's training.

The Dan Smoot Report: Communism in the Civil Rights Movement

This issue of the Dan Smoot Report explores communism in the Civil Rights Movement. He shows how Dr. King and his secretary, Bayard Rustin, are Communist personalities involved in the Civil Rights Movement.

The Influence of the Right and Left in the Civil Rights Movement

Activist Bayard Rustin prepared these remarks for the Negro Leadership Conference in New York in January 1965. He discusses the influence of the American right, the traditional Communist left and the unaffiliated left (the Thirties veterans and the spontaneous left of Harlem and Mississippi).

Time to Retire

This New York Times article advocates the mandatory retirement of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover upon his 70th birthday. The article specifically references Director Hoover's description of Dr. King as "the most notorious liar in the country."