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Ho, Chi Minh

Associated Archive Content : 17 results

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

Letter from Carey B. Joynt to Rev. Carroll D. Payne

In this letter, dated June 20, 1967, Carey Joynt asks Rev. Carroll Payne to review her rough draft regarding the Vietnam War and Ramsey's ideas. She has simplified the arguments to the best of her abilities and hopes that Payne can offer suggestions for her draft.

Letter from Donald F. Hinds to MLK

Donald Hinds writes Dr. King to discuss issues such as the Vietnam War and economic injustice towards Negroes.

Letter from Duncan Wood to MLK

This letter outlines Dr. King's upcoming trip to Moscow. The purpose of the mission is to have past Nobel Peace Prize winners partake in an initiative to promote peace in Vietnam.

Letter from Ernest Gruening to MLK

Democratic Alaskan Senator Earnest Gruening informs Dr. King that he has inserted one of Dr. King's speeches into the Congressional Record, in order to combat misconceptions about Dr. King's beliefs. The speech in question was delivered to the Riverside Church in New York, and it conveyed Dr. King's views on Vietnam. Senator Gruening includes this section of the record with his letter.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK encluding copy of British magazine SLANT

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has enclosed a copy of the British magazine SLANT that has a shortened version of his Riverside Church address inside.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from MLK to Johnie Lee Halle

Dr. King informs Mr. Halle that he has no intention of linking the Civil Rights Movement to the peace movement. He asserts that the Vietnamese have consistently been the victims of colonialism, and argues that war and violence are not acceptable means of resolving conflicts.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Letter from Roy Pfaff of Promoting Enduring Peace Inc.

Promoting Enduring Peace Inc. invites friends of the organization to participate in one of their 1968 travel seminars. The three tours consist of the Round-The-World Goodwill Seminar, Soviet Union Tour, Around-The World Across Siberia, Mongolia and Japan. The traveling seminars include conferences, interviews, and other cultural educational features. The organization provides the member with possible materials they could order prior to leaving for one of the seminars.

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism

This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Speech to SCLC Convention about Vietnam

Dr. King makes one of his first public statements opposing the war in Vietnam during the SCLC Convention held in Birmingham. According to King, "Neither the American people nor the people of North Vietnam is the enemy. The true enemy is war itself, and people on both sides are trapped in its inexorable destruction."

Spring Mobilization Background Material

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam announces Dr. King as its speaker for their April 15 march. In addition, this document offers background information on the conflict in Vietnam.

World Journal Tribune: Dream and Demagogy

The World Journal Tribune writes an article entitled "Dream and Demagogy." The article expounds upon Dr. King's involvement of foreign policy in opposition of the Vietnam War. The authors assert that Dr. King actions have crossed a "thin line" between responsible dissent and irresponsible divisiveness. The article criticizes Dr. King for his political activism and details the military's involvement.