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Height, Dorothy I. (Dorothy Irene)

b. 1912 - d. 2010

Born in Richmond, Virginia, Dorothy I. Height served for over 40 years as president of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW), leading it as a strong voice for justice and fairness. Height earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from New York University. Working for the New York Welfare Department, Height fought for the rights of exploited black domestics. After joining the national staff of the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) (1944-1977), she led the fight for the nationwide integration of all YWCA facilities. In the 1960s, Height wrote a regular column for the Amsterdam News and organized Wednesdays in Mississippi, an interracial dialogue group for women from the North and Mississippi. She stood near Dr. King when he delivered his I Have a Dream speech. Height was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal.

Associated Archive Content : 15 results

Congressional Record Regarding Antipoverty Funding

This Congressional Record documents a statement regarding the antipoverty bill. The statement, made to the public by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urged Congress to support funding towards eradicating poverty for both black and white citizens.

Letter from Dorothy Height to Dr. and Mrs. King

Noted civil rights leader and women's activist Dorothy Height invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be special guests at the National Council of Negro Women's Life Membership Dinner. The event is also set to honor union leaders A. Philip Randolph, Walter Reuther and Mrs. Arthur Goldberg. Singer Lena Horne serves as a co-host to the dinner.

Letter from Dorothy I. Height to MLK

Dorothy Height invites Dr. King to the 32nd National Convention of the National Council of Negro Women. Height serves as the national president of the NCNW.

Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Maurice Dawkins, Assistant Director for Civil Rights of the Office of Economic Opportunity, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting aimed at funding summer projects for riot-prone cities. Mr. Dawkins has already encouraged President Johnson to help fund $75 million for summer programs.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Roy Wilkins, Chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the conference's executive committee.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Theodore Brown writes Dr. King requesting his signature on a telegram to President Johnson from the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa expressing disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and requesting U.S. support for turning over administration to the United Nations.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

In a letter to Dr. King, Mr. Brown encloses an article pertaining to Nigeria being on the brink of disintegration and civil war.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK

The Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference On Africa sent this letter to update Dr. King and other committee members about plans for the third national biennial leadership conference.

Letter to Dorothy Height from Dora McDonald

Dora McDonald apologizes to Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, for not responding sooner to let her know that Dr. and Mrs. King would be unable to attend the Premier Life Membership Dinner. The invitation to the dinner came during Dr. King's sabbatical to write a new book.

Memorandum from MLK

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

Memorandum from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other civil rights leaders of a previous letter to President Johnson regarding United States-Africa relations.

OEO Extends Contract with National Council of Negro Women

This press release from the Office of Economic Opportunity highlights a technical assistance program designed to stimulate home ownership among poor Negro women in the deep South.

Telegram from Dorothy Height to MLK

Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, sends Dr. King well wishes.

The A. Philip Randolph Institute

The A. Philip Randolph Institute was organized to mobilize labor, religious and other groups in support of the civil rights movement. Dr. King was a member of the Advisory Board.

The National Council of Negro Women

This brochure gives a brief overview of the NCNW and the positive results its had on the Negro community.