Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Galbraith, John Kenneth

b. 1908 - d. 2006

John Kenneth Galbraith was a noted Keynesian economist, prolific author, and professor who popularized economics and served as an advisor to presidents from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Bill Clinton. On the faculty at Harvard for more than 25 years, he was U.S. ambassador to India from 1961 to 1963, where he advised Prime Minister Nehru on economics. His books were bestsellers, including The Affluent Society, in which he criticized the over emphasis on consumerism. An avowed liberal, he served as chair of Americans for Democratic Action. He opposed the Vietnam War, advocating that the funds instead be spent addressing poverty. In speeches promoting a guaranteed income for all American families, Dr. King cited Galbraith’s estimate that it could be done for $20 billion a year.

Associated Archive Content : 15 results

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

Annual Report of The President: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

In the SCLC's Annual Presidential Report, Dr. King chronicles a decade of organization's activities to eliminate segregation. The report was delivered at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Members List

This document lists members of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, Commission on National Programs and Policies as of December 1965.

Hungry Club Speech

Dr. King speaks on "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He contends that the dilemma in the world is the result of three major evils: racism, poverty, and war. Dr. King encourages the audience to work toward making America a moral example for the rest of the world.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Dora McDonald updates Dr. King regarding the numerous letters, invitations, phone calls and other pending business matters while he has been away from the office. During this period of absence, Dr. King had been imprisoned and was now recovering at home.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activists, presents Dr. King with a proposed plan aimed at applying pressure on President Johnson and other political leaders to end the war in Vietnam. The plan includes such actions as bombarding Congress with letters, demanding that President Johnson resign, and urging Republicans to nominate a ticket with candidates in support of an anti-Vietnam war policy. If none of the suggestions are effective, Smedley encourages a push for an independent ticket.

Letter from Louis Braun to MLK

The National Chairman of the Campus Americans for Democratic Action reminds Dr. King of an earlier letter in which Dr. King was invited to serve on the organization's advisory board. Braun also lists individuals who have agreed to serve on the board.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Dr. King addresses the United Neighborhood Houses of New York at the Biltmore Hotel. He focuses on the need to alter the ineffective, piecemeal manner in which the government tries to fight poverty by fighting its symptoms, and instead suggest that the government channel those funds into a new "guaranteed annual income" that will help turn non-producers into consumers. This rough draft of the speech contains Dr. King's handwritten revisions and additions.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Dr. King delivers this address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York. He expresses that a lack of job opportunities, education and community economic development contributes to the growing levels of poverty in the United States.

MLK Request from Princeton Committee for Negotiation Now

Mary Temple of the Princeton Committee for Negotiation, invites Dr. King to make an appearance at a fundraising event.

Proposal for a Conference on Democratic Planning in America

This proposal highlights a conference that is focused on creating an understanding of democratic development, economic planning, civil rights and peace movements.

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.

Telegram to MLK from Various Organizational Leaders

Several organizational leaders request that Dr. King join them in Washington, D.C. for an event in which Ambassador Galbraith will address a luncheon with a "major statement on Vietnam."

The New Frontiersmen

William Miller recaps the recent presidential elections and the important issues President John F. Kennedy will have to address. President Kennedy has proposed a new program called the New Frontier, which for many African Americans, is believed to be a part of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement. Miller states that the Civil Rights Movement is not one that can be overlooked by the President and must be seriously addressed if he wants to stay true to his political platform.