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United States Office of the Vice President

Associated Archive Content : 20 results

Civil Rights Act of 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Invitation to President Johnson's Inauguration

Dr. King receives an invitation to attend and participate in the Inauguration of President Lyndon B. Johnson and Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Vice President Humphrey thanks Dr. King for participating in a recent White House Conference, "To Fulfill These Rights," which focused on jobs, jobs training and economic security.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey informs Dr. King of scheduling complications that will delay his response to Dr. King's request to address the SCLC.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

In this letter, Vice President Humphrey extends a holiday greeting to Dr. King and his associates.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK about an Invitation

In this letter, Mr. Hubert Humphrey, Vice President of the United States, writes to Dr. King declining his invitation to address the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Regarding Wiley Branton

In this letter the office of the Vice President informs Dr. King of the new role of Wiley Branton to serve as Executive Secretary of the President's Council on Equal Opportunity.

Letter from Martin Shepard to MLK with Citizens For Kennedy/Fulbright Pamphflet

Dr. Martin Shepard, co-chairman of Citizens for Kennedy/Fullbright 1968, wrote this letter to Dr. King after reading the Dr. King felt Robert F. Kennedy would be the best Democratic Presidential nominee in 1968. Dr. Shepard writes that they "share the same feelings about President Johnsons and his insane war in Vietnam" and encourages Dr. King to read the enclosed pamphlet and join their efforts.

Letter from MLK to Richard Nixon

Dr. King follows up a conversation he had with the Vice President Richard Nixon while in Ghana. He expresses interest in meeting with him to discuss problems in the South.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Vice President Nixon writes to Dr. King concerning the efficiency and effectiveness of the Civil Rights Bill. He expresses his gratitude for a previous correspondence from Dr. King and ensures his continued advocacy of civil rights legislation.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Vice President Richard M. Nixon expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's participation at the recent Religious Leaders Conference on Equal Job Opportunity. Nixon emphasizes the need for ongoing collaboration between local and national leaders to advance critical policy initiatives.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Lyndon B. Johnson invites Dr. King to a conference to hear a progress report on the work of the President's Committee for Equal Employment.

Letter From Vice President Johnson to MLK

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson wrote this note to Dr. King to respectfully decline his invitation to a luncheon and to serve on the board of directors of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He states he enjoyed their last meeting and is looking forward to the next one.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to express his regrets that Dr. King could not attend the White House's Community Leaders Conference. Johnson continues that he and the Equal Employment Opportunity Committee were thrilled with the support Dr. King provided to the conference despite his absence.

Letter from Vice President Nixon to MLK

Vice President Richard Nixon writes Dr. King to say he enjoyed their recent conversation. He encloses copies of speeches he has made on civil rights.

Letter to MLK from Vice President Hubert Humphrey

In this letter, U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his support and applauds him for all his hard work, while commenting on fair and decent housing.

Negroes See No Future for King as National Leader, Except in Politics

Almena Lomax discusses the public opinions of African Americans on Dr. King being elected to a national office.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Dr. King sends Attorney General Robert Kennedy a copy of the telegram he sent to Vice President Lyndon Johnson. The city of St. Augustine, Florida refuses to desegregate its facilities, which Dr. King describes as a "denial of Negro citizenship."

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Dr. King commends Mr. Shriver and the Office of Economic Opportunity for funding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association. Dr. King asserts that this decision is a positive step in the War on Poverty that will directly affect countless numbers of impoverished people.