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Federal Intervention

Associated Archive Content : 79 results

Telegram from Charles McDew to MLK

Charles McDew petitions the assistance of Dr. King in pursuing a federal investigation of the shootings of several civil rights activists in Mississippi and Southwest Georgia. Charles McDew issued this telegram as a representative of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Telegram from Ike Knight to MLK

Ike Knight notifies Dr. King about civil rights issues concerning steel workers going on strike.

Telegram from John Dempsey to President John F. Kennedy

John Dempsey, Governor of Connecticut, telegrams President John F. Kennedy urging "the full force of the federal government be used to assure the personal safety of Dr. King and his associates who are asserting their rights as citizens."

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Dr. King and Wyatt Walker send an urgent request for Burke Marshall to investigate the bombing of SCLC Board Member C. O. Simpkins' home in Shreveport, Louisiana. The two SCLC officials inform Mr. Marshall that the suspects were released for lack of evidence despite other information to the contrary.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker send a urgent request to Burke Marshall of the United States Department of Justice. The two ministers seek a federal investigation in the brutal beating of an SCLC Voter Registration worker in Georgia.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

In order to protect citizens involved in voter registration from attacks and harassment by police, Dr. King requests that President Kennedy intervene the situation in Greenwood, Mississippi.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King alerts Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the brutal treatment against Negroes attempting register to vote in Greenville, Mississippi. He asks Kennedy to intervene in an effort to protect the lives of those individuals working for the right to vote.

Telegram from MLK to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Dr. King asks Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach for an investigation of voter irregularities in the Georgia Democratic primary election.

Telegram to MLK from H. Rap Brown

Police brutality in the black communities of Prattville, Alabama prompts this request sent to Dr. King, which seeks immediate federal investigation and protection of black prisoners.

The Blame in Birmingham

The article, "The Blame in Birmingham", discusses the situation in Birmingham where four little girls were killed during a Sunday school class when a bomb was detonated. Governor Wallace's reaction and the consequences of the actions are mentioned in the article.

The Casualties of The War In Vietnam

Dr. King speaks on behalf of the United States presence in Vietnam at a symposium held in Los Angeles, California. He addresses the moral, social, and political causalities that arise as result of war. Moreover, he urges the powers that be to allocate resources for good and rather than evil.

The Chicago Plan

Dr. King laments over Chicago becoming so much like the South that many African Americans moved north to get away from. Dr. King lays out reasons why African Americans suffer more in Chicago than any other northern city and provides directions to correct the problem.

The Future of Integration

Dr. King addresses the issue of the Future of Integration to an assembly at the State University of Iowa on November 11, 1959.

The Minority Can Afford Adequate Housing

Mr. Borden writes to inform readers of the housing inequalities in Dade County. Borden ultimately explains that the problem extends from not a singular reason, but from a mixture of social and economic ills. He believes that if the focus was shifted from building expensive commercial buildings to investing in ordinary neighborhoods, there would be significant improvement. This also serves as a call to action for those who agree with the information to mail it to their representatives in Congress.

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

The Social Organization of Nonviolence

Dr. King breaks down the structure of a nonviolent movement. He describes at length the difference between "token" integration and true integration. He describes three types of violence that could be used to achieve integration to which he prefers the "wholesome," nonviolent choice. Lastly, Dr. King gives his opinion on the "evils" of war.

Transcript of National Educational Television's For Freedom Now

For Freedom Now, with host Dr. Kenneth Clark, is television’s first exchange of ideas by the leaders of five organizations engaged in securing full civil rights for Negroes. Featured guests are Dr. King of SCLC, Whitney Young of the National Urban League, James Farmer of CORE, James Forman of SNCC, and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Newsletter

This issue of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom newsletter, Four Lights, was sent to Coretta Scott King. It features an article about the current state of their demonstrations against Vietnam, including a quote by Dr. Benjamin Spock calling on President Johnson to end the attack on the Vietnam War.

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