Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Carmichael, Stokely

b. 1941 - d. 1998

Stokely Carmichael was born in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and emigrated to the U.S. in 1952. He earned his bachelor's degree from Howard University in 1964. He disagreed with many in the nonviolent movement and promoted self-defense among African Americans. He founded the Lowndes County Freedom Organization (LCFO) in 1965, an all black independent political party which chose a black panther as its symbol. LCFO is widely regarded as the forerunner of the Black Panther Party. In 1966 Carmichael was elected chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and used the rallying cry “Black Power.” After visiting Africa as a guest of African independence leader Sekou Toure, Carmichael became a devoted Pan-Africanist. He changed his name to Kwame Toure. In 1973 he made Guinea his home.

Associated Archive Content : 81 results

Political Cartoon: Nourishing the Enemy

This political cartoon satirizes various elements of antiwar protesters regarding Vietnam. The inference is that events and positions originating from those elements are in essence aid and comfort to the enemy. "King Speeches" is prominently displayed.

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

The author argues that the Civil Rights Movement joining the Peace Demonstrators will aid America's enemies and prolong the Vietnam war.

Press Release: MLK Joins Sponsors of April 15 Marches on San Francisco and New York City

In this press release, Dr. King announces his support of a massive mobilization against the Vietnam War. Sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, major peace marches are being held in New York City and San Francisco. Mrs. King is also listed as a leader who endorsed the demonstrations.

Protest Against MLK Flyer

This flyer accuses Dr. King of being a traitor and calls for a protest rally when he appears at Grosse Pointe High School in Detroit

Reader's Digest: Martin Luther King's March on Washington

This April 1968 article by William Schulz warns that the Poor People's March on Washington and the planned disruption of the nation's capital pose an enormous challenge to security forces and may humiliate the country internationally.

Report of Director of Mission Development

Rev. Dr. Archie Hargraves was a distinguished urban minister and church leader who served America's cities for more than half a century. In this report he gives a summary of individual organizations under Mission Development, of which he was the Director. All of these organizations aimed to augment employment and economic opportunities for their respective surrounding communities.

Southern Conference Educational Fund Endorsement of MLK Vietnam Stance

The Southern Conference Educational Fund issues this article in the Patriot News Service. This statement supports Dr. King's sentiments regarding the Vietnam War and also details issues of race, injustice, and inequality in various places throughout the world.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Stokely Carmichael Requests MLK Photo

Julia Polk of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, asks for an autographed photo of Dr. King for Stokely Carmichael's collection.

The Evening Star: The Perversion of a Cause

This article describes the effect of James Meredith's withdrawal from the race for Adam Powell's congressional seat. Civil Rights activists such as Dr. King, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. McKissick offer their opinions on how the race was handled.

The Man Who Knows: General Westmoreland on Vietnam

This editorial from a New York newspaper features statements from General William C. Westmoreland arguing for the public's support "about what is going on in Viet Nam, and why." Dr. King is among those listed as having opposing viewpoints towards the War.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

The Story of Snick

"From Freedom High to Black Power," by Gene Roberts, describes the opposing views voiced by SNCC and Dr. King regarding the civil rights movement. SNCC asserts a message of violence and black power, while Dr. King promotes a philosophy of love and nonviolence.

To the Negroes of America

Robert Welch compares the American Negro Population to Negro populations around the world in regards to ownership of various consumer items. He asserts that Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther are shameless liars working in league with communists.

U.S. Reds Fan Racist Flames To Stir Vietnam War Protest

William F. Buckley, a conservative columnist, decries the involvement of Negro leaders such as Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael n a recent Vietnam War protest. He compares Carmichael with members of the Ku Klux Klan, and he also alleges Communist involvement with the protest.

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.

Walter Winchell: Man Doing A Column

In part of this edition of his syndicated gossip column, Walter Winchell briefly criticizes SNCC in the irreverent style for which he was known.

WBTV Editorial: "King's Bedfellows"

The content of this document suggested that Dr. King break ties with leaders Stokley Carmichael and H. Rap Brown, due to their stance on violence as a weapon. At the bottom of this document, is an invitation for Dr. King, H. Rap Brown and Stokley Carmichael to respond.

WDIX: In Whose Interest Is Changing The Law?

This editorial was broadcast on WDIX, a radio station based out of Orangeburg, South Carolina, on March 20, 1968. The piece questions if President Johnson's actions in favor of civil rights were under the pressure of Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael, stating that the Great Society is an danger. The author further argues that the status of African Americans as been largely improved, just "not as quickly" as they would have hoped and that should be good enough.

Which Way for the Negro Now?

In his thirteenth civil rights cover story, Newsweek General Editor Peter Goldman reports on a movement in crisis, with fragmented leadership, impatient black followers, and increasingly alienated white supporters. Goldman and reporters interviewed top leadership ranging from the Urban League’s Whitney Young to black power advocate Stokely Carmichael. This article asks what will become of the Negro Revolution.

WRAL- TV Broadcast Transcript of Viewpoint show

WRAL-TV Viewpoint #1790 is a critical review of the efforts of Stokely Carmichael and Dr. King. The speaker claims Dr. King uses the threat of riots in cities to blackmail the United States Congress into doing the bidding of the Black Power Movement.

Pages