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United States - Constitutional Law

Associated Archive Content : 223 results

Letter from MLK to Mr. Hindman

Dr. King informs Mr. Hindman that although they share the same perspective regarding capital punishment, he does not get involved with civil suits, but instead works to change laws.

Letter from MLK to Willie Faust

Dr. King responds to a letter from Willie Gate Faust regarding an inquiry pertaining to legal advice and his release from jail. Reverend King refers the inmate to Attorney Donald Lee Hollowell, counsel for the NAACP.

Letter from Mrs. Charles Wilkinson to MLK

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Fund Committee of Aurora, Illinois sends $1,020 to help provide food, clothing and medicine for needy citizens in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Mrs. Edward G. Rolfe to MLK

The wife of a wrongfully accused man, Edward G. Rolfe, pleads for Dr. King to hear her story of discrimination.

Letter from Mrs. R.B. Hassell to MLK

Writing from Memphis, Tennessee, Mrs. Hassell expresses her love for America and her concern regarding the cruel treatment many have experienced throughout the world. She offers encouragement to Dr. King and other preachers who are advocates for peace.

Letter from Nicholas Katzenbach to MLK

Letter from Representative James H. Scheuer to MLK

Congressman James Scheuer (D-New York) writes Dr. King that he believes progress is finally being made in Selma, Alabama, and he congratulations Dr. Kin on his excellent leadership.

Letter from Richard U. Smith to MLK

Rev. Richard Smith expresses his political views on the possible re-election of Adam Clayton Powell. Smith explains to Dr. King and other leaders that to rally for Mr. Powell is to ignore the moral character of man.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Attorney General Robert Kennedy addresses the prosecutions that involved leaders from the Albany Movement. Kennedy discusses these details and facts of the case with Dr. King.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding a case of civil disobedience in Albany, Georgia. He discusses the boycotting of Carl Smith's supermarket due to Smith serving as a juror in the civil action case of Ware vs. Johnson.

Letter from Robert L. Hartley to MLK

In this letter, SCLC member Robert Hartley asks Dr. King for assistance in getting released from jail.

Letter from Robert L. Pino to MLK

Mr. Pino, Chairman of the Local Union 2603 Civil Rights Committee of Lackawanna, New York, praises Dr. King's efforts in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Robert Sandberg from MLK

Robert Sandberg criticizes Dr. King for his recent statements on the Vietnam War. Mr. Sandberg states that Dr. King's position has now undermined his effectiveness as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Congressman Robert T. Stafford, U. S. Representative from Vermont, informs Dr. King he has signed the discharge petition regarding the District of Columbia Home Rule Bill.

Letter from Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis to MLK

Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis invite Dr. King to speak to the students at University of Oregon.

Letter from Stanley Singer to MLK

Stanley Singer replies to Dr. King's article in the NY Times Magazine entitled, "The Case Against 'Tokenism'." Mr. Singer implies that the Negro race is inferior due to their immorality. He highlights the perceived negative attributes of the African American community by the inadequacies within their family structure. Mr. Singer expounds on nonviolent resistance, the Civil War, the U.S. constitution, and more.

Letter from T. Z. Riggins to MLK

T. Z. Riggins writes Dr. King a thoughtful letter commending his leadership and the influence he brings to America. Aside from Abraham Lincoln, Riggins views Dr. King as the only leader who can bring people together. Riggins believes that Dr. King's job was assigned to him by God and expresses his pride that Dr. King was chosen to "lay the foundation" for the US.

Letter from the Faculty of the Tuskegee Institute to President Kennedy

Members of the faculty and staff of Tuskegee Institute issue a plea to President John F. Kennedy to intervene in the Birmingham crisis of 1963. They request that the President use an upcoming speech to discuss Constitutional rights, send the FBI to Alabama to investigate "charges of police brutality," and revoke federal funds that support segregation and persuade business leaders to desegregate public facilities.

Letter from the Holy Name College to MLK

The Holy Name College requests Dr. King's written contribution for a new section in their publication entitled Interest Magazine. Interest Magazine is an international publication dedicated to the understanding and appreciation of theology. Dr. King has been selected to focus on the issue regarding Christianity and the American Negro. The college provides Dr. King with the restrictions of his essay and assures him that they will print his written work without editing for authenticity.

Letter from Vince Hartke to MLK

Democratic Indiana Senator Vance Hartke informs Dr. King that the Senate might not vote on the issue of the Voting Rights Bill due to a recent decision concerning the constitutionality of a poll tax.

Letter from Vivian C. Kelley to MLK and President Kennedy

Vivian C. Kelley offers her support to Dr. King in his continued efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Mrs. Kelley shares with Dr. King a letter in which she asks President John F. Kennedy to address issues of discrimination in the United States. In response to Mrs. Kelly, Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, expresses thanks on the behalf of President John F. Kennedy and assures Mrs. Kelley the President and the Administration are dedicated to ending discrimination and securing the Constitutional Rights of all Americans.

Letter from Washington University to MLK

Faculty of the Political Science Department at Washington University release a resolution supporting Dr. King and his efforts to secure voting rights for Negroes in Selma, Alabama. They urge the Federal Government to take a serious look at this issue following recent attacks upon Negroes trying to exercise their right to vote.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Letter from William H. Chester to Rev. A. D. King

William Chester, Regional Director of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, writes Rev. A. D. King as a follow-up to their earlier telephone conversation regarding the transports unions supporting the Negro community in Alabama. Chester provides suggestions for how the SCLC should try to secure the participation of the large unions, such as the Teamsters and the National Maritime Union. Chester also addresses a copy of the letter to Dr. King, Rev. Abernathy and Rev. Shuttlesworth.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

William Kivi forwards Dr. King a copy of a postcard addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The correspondence alleges that the riots occuring in urban cities are a result of a economic stronghold to keep, in Kivi's view, "oppressing the oppressed." Kivi uses an example of California Governor Ronald Reagan's proposal to nix any federal program that supplements the War on Poverty.

Letter from William Ryan to MLK

William Ryan, member of Congress writes Dr. King after he and other members of Congress were able to visit Selma. After witnessing the conditions at hand, they have been urged to break the barrier on the right to vote.

Letter from Willie Gate Forest to MLK

Willie Gate Forest writes Dr. King requesting his assistance after being wrongly accused of a crime he claims to have not committed. He stresses that he remains in jail despite another person confessing to the crime.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Pamphlet

This pamphlet promotes the historic March on Washington of August 28, 1963. The pamphlet calls upon Congress to pass civil rights legislation and end the "twin evils of discrimination and economic deprivation" that plague the nation.

Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.

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