Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Inspirational letters

Associated Archive Content : 64 results

Letter from MLK to Joseph Gaulan

This is a letter from Dr. King to Joseph Gaulan to thank him for the letter of support while he was in the Birmingham jail.

Letter from MLK to Mary M. Drummond

Dr. King thanks Ms. Drummond for her supportive correspondence regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail." He states that the opportunity to fight racial injustice is a "rare privilege" and regards his open letter as an attempt to examine racial inequity under the lens of Christian ethics.

Letter from MLK to Miss Kathy Granata

Dr. King responds to a previous letter from Kathy Granata hoping that her words reflect the attitudes and thinking of the majority of today's young people. The Reverend continues by addressing Granata's young friend, stating that his exposure to her may aid him toward discovery.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Stoug

Dr. King writes Mrs. Stoug thanking her for sending a copy of the play, "Listen America." He also offers advice on how to market her play and expresses his appreciation for her support for the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Wesley Fisher

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the kind letter from Mr. Fisher. He also informs him that Aaron Henry has been absent and will probably reply about some donated clothing upon his return.

Letter from MLK to Zelma George

Dr. King thanks Zelma George and her husband for their hospitality while he visited Cleveland.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Ericson to MLK

Mr. and Mrs. Ericson are expressing their immense support for Dr. King and his humanitarianism. They stress the importance to look beyond the racial lines and focus on a more cohesive world community.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Robinson to Rev. Abernathy

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson send a sermon to Reverend Abernathy and his followers hoping to encourage them on their difficult days ahead.

Letter from Mrs. Edward G. Rolfe to MLK

The wife of a wrongfully accused man, Edward G. Rolfe, pleads for Dr. King to hear her story of discrimination.

Letter from Mrs. Ernest Erber to MLK

Mrs. Erber tells Dr. King that she is sending the newspaper clipping featuring her daughter Elena. Elena raised eighty cents to fight the injustices of racism.

Letter From Ms. Gretchen Johnston to MLK

Gretchen Johnston, a Caucasian Quaker, expresses her support and gratitude to Dr. King regarding the employment of women, integration of schools, and awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Nancy Childs to MLK

Nancy Childs, a junior in high school, writes Dr. King to convey support in the fight for equality and civil rights in America. Childs is a student at an integrated high school in Detroit, Michigan and expresses her delight that Dr. King has the ability to stand up for his beliefs. This letter was drafted following the bloody assault against demonstrators during the first attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery on March 7, 1965.

Letter from Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath to MLK

Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath, President of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, thanks Dr. King for speaking out not only against the Vietnam War, but also in support of helping the poor. Rabbi Eisendrath tells Dr. King that he has"ignited the conscience of America, as no other man, on the struggle for racial justice."

Letter from Rev. John B. Morris to MLK

Rev. John B. Morris writes Dr. King while he is in the city jail in Atlanta, Georgia. Morris asserts that Dr. King's stay in jail will "renew strength to the student movement."

Letter from Silvio Romoaldo to MLK

Silvio Romoaldo sends Dr. King his support for the Civil Rights Movement and the efforts against the Vietnam War.

Letter from Sue M. Stiles to MLK

Sue Stiles writes Dr. King to assert her viewpoints and beliefs according to her childhood and upbringing. In expressing these truths, Stiles affirms her support in Dr. King's practices in human rights and encloses a financial contribution.

Letter from T. Z. Riggins to MLK

T. Z. Riggins writes Dr. King a thoughtful letter commending his leadership and the influence he brings to America. Aside from Abraham Lincoln, Riggins views Dr. King as the only leader who can bring people together. Riggins believes that Dr. King's job was assigned to him by God and expresses his pride that Dr. King was chosen to "lay the foundation" for the US.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Influential clergyman, activist and fellow Morehouse alum Rev. Thomas Elliott Huntley thanks Dr. King for the warm hospitality he received upon his visit to Atlanta. He further discusses Dr. King's next visit to St. Louis and offers his home if other accommodations were not made.

Letter from Wiley Bell to MLK

Inspired by Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail," Wiley Bell thanks Dr. King for the "heart warming and heart rending article." Bell tells Dr. King that his letter has inspired his studies as a fellow clergyman.

Letter from Zelma Dodd to MLK

Zelma Dodd sends Dr. King her best wishes along with two poems entitled, "The Soul of a Black Man," and "A Negro Soldier."

Letter of Support from Dr. May Chinn to MLK

On a recent vacation, Dr. Chinn attended a "friends meeting" in a small town outside of Williamsburg, Pennsylvania. Chinn noticed that Dr. King's teachings and spiritual dedication had profoundly influenced that community. He states that Dr. King has inspired people both in that town and around the world, and that he is "everyone's leader."

Letter Regarding MLK

This letter from Dad to Frank and Mark commends Dr. Kings use of the 'march' as means to secure a better life for the Negro. The author goes on to say the integration benefits both the Negro and whites in the supply and demand of labor.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy Regarding MLK Memorial Service

Dr. Abernathy receives this letter from an anonymous sender suggesting that the SCLC plan a memorial service in commemoration of Dr. King on Emancipation Day. The writer provides a list of music and poems that would be appropriate for the occasion.

Letter to MLK from Lee Wood

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King explaining that the Democratic Party and Republican Party are "two shades of the same color." He suggests that because of his qualifications, Dr. King should run for President with Robert Kennedy as his Vice President.

Lifts to Living

Nanny H. Burroughs sends a short book entitled "Here and Beyond - The Sunset" with her signature and tag line to wish Dr. King a glorious New Year. The book contains a list of inspirational songs, parables, and poems regarding the process of life and spiritual encouragement.

March On Mississippi

Florence Fyall describes a scene of violence on peaceful demonstrators in her poem entitled March On Mississippi."

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Sadye Brooks

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to the Brooks family on the recent loss of their beloved husband and father.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Uvee Arbouin

Dr. and Mrs. King write Uvee Arbouin to commend her Christian leadership and devotion to Jesus Christ.

Telegram from MLK and Mrs. King to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Dr. and Mrs. King commend Dr. Benjamin E. Mays for all he has accomplished during his twenty-seven years as President of Morehouse College.

Telegram from MLK to Reverend F. D. Reece

Dr. King congratulates Selma, Alabama Reverend F. D. Reese for demonstrating on behalf of teachers fighting injustice.

Pages