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Integrated housing

Associated Archive Content : 85 results

Letter from Mary A. Edmonds to MLK

Mary A. Edmonds expresses her disapproval of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mary B. Courtney to MLK

Mary B. Courtney requests Dr. King's help to sell her property. She explains to him that the house has been on the market for three years in St. Petersburg, Florida, and while "several colored people" have contacted the real estate agency with interest, they are dissuaded by the lack of African Americans in the neighborhood. The author suggests that Dr. King contact some of his associates in St. Petersburg to assist in the matter.

Letter from MLK and Albert A. Raby

Albert Raby and Dr. King assert that the Weston project is "a national test case for the integrity of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act." The population of Negroes in DuPage County is extremely low and the jobs would not offer for them an equal opportunity.

Letter From MLK Concerning the Sustainability of SCLC

Addressing the recipients of this letter as "Friends", Dr. King shares the triumphs and struggles of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference while on its continuous quest for civil rights. He concludes the message by encouraging readers to contribute support to this "urgent moral crusade".

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

Letter from MLK to T. C. Johnson

Dr. King thanks Mrs. T. C. Johnson for her contribution to the SCLC and encloses an official receipt for her gift. King states, "Without your moral support we would be caught in a dungeon of despair."

Letter from MLK to Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends

Dr. King commends the Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends for pursuing an initiative to buy a home in an all white section of Hartford, Connecticut. He proudly supports the project and extends his best wishes.

Letter from Moreland Griffith Smith to MLK

Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee, invites Dr. King or a representative to an open meeting which will be held in Alabama. The purpose of the meeting is to gather information regarding equal protection under the law in areas such as housing, voting, and employment.

Letter from Richard A. Russell to MLK about Integrated Housing

In this letter to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mr. Russell inquires about the Federal Housing Administration's decision on the requirements of housing integration.

Letter from Robert Wacker to MLK

Robert Wacker is highly distressed about housing discrimination in his neighborhood. In this letter to Dr. King, Wacker displays his determination towards eradicating segregated communities and encourages Dr. King to rally around this issue.

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

Letter from Sandra Greenia to MLK

Sandra Greenia requests that Dr. King send her some information regarding integration. She emphasizes that she gained a lot by living in various integrated U.S. Naval Bases.

Letter from Shirley Leonard to MLK

Shirley Leonard encloses a check for ten dollars to help Dr. King further integration.

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

Letter from Viva O. Sloam to CORE Members

Viva O. Sloam, sends a letter to members of the Congress for Racial Equality regarding integration in a Kentucky neighborhood.

Letter of White Opposition to MLK

A gentleman by the name of David writes to Dr. King expressing his belief that segregation is the "best way to avoid dating, dancing, sex and marriage" between Negroes and whites.

Letter to MLK from Cydrisse Crafton

In this document, Mr. Crafton writes to Dr. King advising not to participate in another "March". He asserts that "Negro's" are marching because they desire to live in a white neighborhood.

Letter to the Federal Housing Commissioner from MLK

This document is a Federal Housing Administration application from Dr. King concerning one of his many housing programs.

Memorandum from Ralph D. Abernathy to SCLC Board Members and Executive Staff

Rev. Ralph Abernathy informs the board members and executive staff of SCLC that Dr. King is taking a leave of absence for two months to write his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?" During Dr. King's absence, Rev. Abernathy took over the activities of the SCLC.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

MLK Draft on Jackie Robinson and Hall of Fame

Dr. King highlights the achievements of Jackie Robinson in this article about Robinson's induction into baseball's Hall of Fame. Dr. King applauds Robinson for using his celebrity status for the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK on Christian Love

In this statement, Dr. King corrects "what may be a false impression." King states that while he does discuss the Christian way of love and non-violence as a tool to unify blacks in the Movement, integration is still necessary in order to truly obtain change.

MLK Responds to Questions Pertaining to the Civil Rights Movement

Dr. King responds to a series of questions concerning such topics as his opposition to the Vietnam War, the direction of the Civil Rights Movement, urban riots in Detroit and Newark, and SCLC initiatives catered to the ghettos of the American South.

MLK Statement Before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

Dr. King makes a public statement before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder. He addresses five causes of the recent riots: hite backlash, unemployment, discriminatory practices, war, and features peculiar to big cities.

MLK's Remarks on Conference with the President

Dr. King provides the perspective he shared at a meeting held by the President with leaders from the white and Negro community discussing civil rights. His speech includes several steps to reach equality across the US.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

Negro's Defense Against Acts of Violence

Dr. King describes nonviolent direct action and its effects against oppressors of the movement. He speaks about the undaunted fight and relentlessness even in the face of brutality.

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

News from the SCEF

The Southern Conference Educational Fund writes a statement regarding "two young leaders of integration" who visited a fellow leader in jail and also got arrested. Charles McDew, a Negro and Chairman of the SNCC, and Robert Zellner, a white man and staff member of the SNCC, were charged with criminal anarchy just for bringing books and fruit to a friend who was arrested for participating in demonstrations.

Notes on Atlanta Housing Hearing

This document contains the United States Commission on Civil Rights notes on an Atlanta Housing hearing. The Commission believes that Atlanta will present "new aspects of the problem." The Commission is also collecting information to determine whether equal opportunity in housing is denied due to discrimination. Also included are questions the Commission plans to ask regarding housing.

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