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March of Poor People to Washington (1968)

Associated Archive Content : 93 results

Letter from Lorraine Hughes to MLK Regarding the March on Washington

Mrs. Hughes requests that Dr. King does not proceed with the march in Washington D.C., due to the inability of poor people to conduct a peaceful movement.

Letter from Margaret Long to MLK

Margaret Long asks Dr. King to reconsider his plans for the demonstration in Washington, D.C. She expresses that though she understands why Dr. King advocates for demonstrations, she does not believe it will be advantageous.

Letter from Marian R. Johnson to MLK

Mrs. Johnson expresses her concern regarding the potential threats to undermine Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Marie Brookter to MLK

Marie Brookter offers Dr. King "information as to the needs of the Poor" in preparation for the upcoming March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK Regarding March on Washington

This document is a letter from Martha D. Kennedy to Dr. King in response to a previous letter from Dr. King in regards to a pilgrimage to Washington, D.C..

Letter from Mary Hart to MLK

In one of three letters Mary Hart sends Dr. King, she thanks him for his efforts in assisting poor people in America. Hart says that she is representing all poor people and sends apologies that she will not be present for the March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from MLK to Frances H. Vicario

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mrs. Vicario and the Chemical Bank New York Trust Company for their generous contribution to the SCLC. He explains how the contribution will help in a time of need as the SCLC enters the critical phase of their ten-year ministry.

Letter from MLK to James K. Shipman

Dr. King thanks James Shipman, Chairman of the Organization Committee of the Ohio Association of Community-Junior Colleges, for an invitation to speak at Cuyahog Community College. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to schedule demands related to planning for the first four months of 1968.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Kjelle Eide

In this letter Dr. King is expressing regret to Kjell Eide for the continued difficulty in organizing the peace mission. He currently aims to focus on the organizational plans for domestic issues, but would still consider a proposed alternative.

Letter from MLK to SCLC Action Committee

Dr. King reminds members of the Action Committee of their upcoming meeting. He requests that each member come prepared to "make a report on [their] category of activity concerning the Washington Mobilization."

Letter from Morris Kight to MLK Regarding March on Washington

This document is a letter from Morris Kight to Dr. King in which Kight expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's efforts and offers his assistance in mobilizing individuals for the planned March on Washington February 1968.

Letter from Mose Pleasure, Jr. to MLK

Mr. Pleasure writes Dr. King to inform him of his decision not to accept employment with SCLC. He refers to an earlier visit with Dr. King and friends in Atlanta, and comments that the group's enthusiasm bodes well for the upcoming Poor People's March on Washington.

Letter from Mr. Peter Feldman to MLK

In this letter Peter Feldman, the production manager for WRVR Radio in New York City, requests an interview with Dr. King the day of his sermon at Riverside Church. WRVR feels the interview would be a "significant platform" for his upcoming march on Washington. Dr. King would be assassinated less than a month later.

Letter from Mrs. Glenn Durbin to MLK

Mrs. Glenn Durbin writes to Dr. King expressing her opposing views on Communism.

Letter From Ms. Gretchen Johnston to MLK

Gretchen Johnston, a Caucasian Quaker, expresses her support and gratitude to Dr. King regarding the employment of women, integration of schools, and awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Nancy F. Oakes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Nancy Oakes writes a letter of support to Reverend Ralph Abernathy and wishes him success with the March for the Poor People's Crusade.

Letter from Oliver Hunkin to MLK

In this letter Oliver Hunkin, of the British Broadcasting Corporation, offers his gratitude to Dr. King for an interview that he gave to Gerald Priestland of BBC-2.

Letter from Paul Good to MLK

In this letter, Paul Good repeats his first attempt to volunteer as a "press liaison" for the SCLC, and presents Dr. King with his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign.

Letter from Peter A. Minthom to Ralph D. Abernathy

Peter Minthom, an American Indian from Oregon, requests assistance in traveling to Washington D.C. for the Poor People’s March.

Letter from Robert D. Heslep to MLK

The Philosophy of Education Society, Southeastern Region writes Dr. King giving full moral support in the development of "The Poor People's Washington Campaign."

Letter from Rosalind Rhines to MLK

Ms. Rhines, a student at Drake College of Business, requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Civil Rights Bill proposed to Congress, and which candidate in the coming election has the best understanding of the American Negro struggle.

Letter from Ruth N. Smith to MLK

Ruth Smith sends a monetary contribution in support of Dr. King's efforts for African Americans and the Civil Rights Movement. She informs him that she will not be physically present for the upcoming demonstration in D.C., but she will support him in spirit.

Letter from Terrie to MLK

The author informs Dr. King of her
inability to continue working for the SCLC due to conflicting personal issues and emotional instability. She asserts that the work of the SCLC is too important for her to remain "jumping around in the organization." She also informs Dr. King that the SCLC is family and that she is only leaving for personal reasons. Lastly, she requests that other primary members of the organization are informed of this departure.

Letter from The Downtown Charity Club to MLK

The Downtown Charity Club wishes to accompany Dr. King from the Baltimore headquarters for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

In a letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King, a response to a newspaper article written by Bruce Galphin is attached. The article refers to the Civil Rights Movement as a rather violent campaign, due to the harm done to the "good order of society." The response argues on the side of the Civil Rights Movement, and further proves that it is indeed a nonviolent campaign.

Letter from William L. Harris to MLK

William Harris, vice-chairman of the Extra Legal Forum at the Law School of the University of Virginia, invites Dr. King to speak at a Forum event.

Letter from William Mahoney to MLK

William Mahoney asks Dr. King for his input on a SCLC monthly publication in which he is attempting to create. The publication would seek to educate the public on social, economic, and political problems African Americans endure.

Letter from WSB-TV's Don Elliot Heald to MLK

Don Elliot, of WSB Television in Atlanta, encloses an editorial for Dr. King to review. In the editorial, American Baptist Convention President J. H. Jackson criticizes Dr. King for not taking a more constructive approach towards influencing Congress to pass more civil rights legislation.

Letter to MLK from Paul Kennedy

Paul Kennedy writes Dr. King to state that since Robert Kennedy announced his bid for the presidency, he believes hat an appreciative, token march on Washington would be more effective than a force march this year.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

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