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Southern Christian Leadership Conference--Relations with Government Officials

Associated Archive Content : 210 results

Letter from Congressman Charles Diggs to MLK

Michigan Congressman Charles Diggs returns the proposed plans for the August 28th, 1963 "March on Washington" to Dr. King.

Letter from Congressman F. Bradford Morse to MLK

Massachusetts 5th District Representative F. Bradford Morse expresses his disappointment that the Home Rule bill for the District of Columbia was not approved. He informs Dr. King that further action is unlikely to be taken in 1965.

Letter from Congressman Herman Toll to MLK

Pennsylvania Democratic Congressman Herman Toll thanks Dr. King for his letter and assures Dr. King that he will continue to seek strong civil rights legislation.

Letter from Congressman James G. O'Hara to MLK

Congressman James G. O'Hara, US Representative from Michigan, informs Dr. King that he has signed the home rule discharge petition for the District of Columbia.

Letter from Congressman James Roosevelt to MLK

Representative James Roosevelt thanks Dr. King for his words regarding Roosevelt's contribution to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Congressman Lionel Van Deerlin to MLK

Congressman Lionel Van Deerlin, the 37th district Representative from California, thanks Dr. King for the telegram urging him to sign the discharge petition for the home rule bill for the District of Columbia, and he lets Dr. King know he has already signed it.

Letter from Congressman Ralph J. Rivers to MLK

Representative Rivers of Alaska informs Dr. King that he intends to sign the District of Columbia Home Rule Bill.

Letter from Congressman William Ryan to MLK

Congressman William Ryan gives Dr. King an update regarding the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act that is still under debate in Congress. Ryan, a staunch supporter of the bill, mentions his persistent efforts to keep the legislation from being blocked by adversaries.

Letter from Cornelius E. Gallagher to MLK

Congressman Gallagher of New Jersey writes Dr. King to confirm reception of his telegram in which he urges House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Mississippi Congress was seated despite Congressman Gallagher's vote against the action.

Letter from Curtis Cosby to MLK

Curtis Cosby, writing on behalf of the Esquires Club, encourages Dr. King to support attorney Donald Hollowell as the replacement for judge Boyd Sloan in order to place a Negro in a high level federal position.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Senator Daniel B. Brewster writes Dr. King to thank him for urging his support for the elimination of the poll tax.

Letter from Don Edwards to MLK

Representative Don Edwards of California sends his gratitude to Dr. King for a recent letter. Edwards informs Dr. King that they are currently drafting legislation to amend the Civil Rights Act.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Irvine I. Turner

Dora McDonald explains to Irvine Turner that Dr. King is unable to endorse political candidates due to the "non-partisan nature" of the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Miss Rankin at the US Justice Department

Dora McDonald sends Miss Rankin of the Justice Department a copy of a statement made by Dr. King before the Republican Party. The statement was in reference to his proposed "Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged."

Letter from Dorothy Cotton to Mrs. E.A. Johnson

Educational Consultant Dorothy Cotton writes workshop attendee Mrs. E.A. Johnson concerning the importance of citizenship education, particularly in getting Negroes to vote. She addresses a concern of Mrs. Johnson's involving a young man invited to attend a citizenship workshop. Ms. Cotton informs Mrs. Johnson that Dr. King will speak with Attorney General Robert Kennedy in addressing the young man's situation.

Letter from Douglas Elleby to MLK

The Governor of Brazil, Adhemar de Barros, congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Governor Barros expounds on what the Nobel Peace Prize stirred in the Brazilian nation. Sao Paulo, the larges city in Brazil, aspires to form a sense of fellowship with Dr. King and extend the appropriate honors for a man of peace.

Letter from Dr. Herzl Ragins to MLK

Dr. Herzl Ragins writes to Dr. King, denouncing him because of his support for Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from E. P. and M. C. King to President Johnson

The Kings write President Johnson to discuss their dissatisfaction that neither Dr. King nor Charles Evers was appointed a member of the Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder.

Letter from Edward Kennedy to MLK

Edward Kennedy thanks Dr. and Mrs. King for their hospitality during the Annual Convention of the SCLC.

Letter from EEOC Commissioner Samuel C. Jackson to MLK

Commissioner Samuel Jackson sends Dr. King a copy of the First Annual Report of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Letter from Ernest Gruening to MLK

Democratic Alaskan Senator Earnest Gruening informs Dr. King that he has inserted one of Dr. King's speeches into the Congressional Record, in order to combat misconceptions about Dr. King's beliefs. The speech in question was delivered to the Riverside Church in New York, and it conveyed Dr. King's views on Vietnam. Senator Gruening includes this section of the record with his letter.

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Georgia Attorney General Eugene Cook regrets that Dr. King has refused to reveal the names of individuals affiliated with Communist activities throughout the United States. Mr. Cook states that he will continue to investigate the file on his own accord.

Letter from Everett McKinley Dirksen to MLK

Everett M. Dirksen expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter and informs him of the satisfaction he received in being an asset in solidifying the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from FBI Director John Edgar Hoover to MLK

J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, thanks Dr. King for his telegram regarding the work of Special Agents of the Bureau in Alabama.

Letter from Frank Thompson, Jr. to MLK

Congressman Thompson of New Jersey writes Dr. King to acknowledge his recent letter urging his support of the vote against the Mississippi Delegation. Thompson informs Dr. King that he was one of Representatives who opposed the seating, and although dissenters did not prevail he is convinced "that this action has helped in the fight to enfranchise those who have been discriminated against for so long."

Letter from Gordon Allott to MLK

Gordon Alliot, a member of the United States Senate, sends his appreciation to Dr. King for his endorsement for a position on the "historic civil rights bill."

Letter from Governor Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Governor Nelson Rockefeller encloses a contribution of $5,000 to the SCLC and discusses the forthcoming voter registration drive in which the SCLC will conduct.

Letter from Henry Gonzalez to MLK

Representative Henry Gonzalez, a democratic politician representing Texas, responds to a request letter for donations from the SCLC. While he encloses a check, he criticizes the fact that the NAACP was excluded from the Mississippi March.

Letter from Howard W. Rogerson to MLK

Howard W. Rogerson of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights writes Dr. King seeking his opinion and advice regarding a "technical publication for disseminating information on current activities and publications in the field of civil rights."

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK Regarding an Invitation

In this letter Senator Hubert Humphrey urges Dr. King to accept an invitation to speak at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association.

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