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Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy on House Resolution 7152


Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy comments on House Bill 7152, the bill that eventually culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Kennedy argues that the bill is a "test" to white Americans and that it must "effectively eliminate racial discrimination in voting, education and in employment." He addresses the eleven titles of the bill and describes the differences between the current bill and the version introduced by the president. Kennedy finally asserts that if the bill is not passed, then "the whole nation will be the loser."

Tuesday, October 15, 1963

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson


Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

Telegram from L. M. McCoy to MLK


L. M. McCoy telegrams Dr. King expressing the urgency that the Methodist Church of Brazil receive a reply to their invitation for him to speak at their Centennial celebration in Brazil.

Friday, May 12, 1967

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL


This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Sunday, April 10, 1966

Letter from MLK to the Fourth Grade Class of Germantown Friends School


Dr. King thanks Kendall Bryant and the fourth grade class of the Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia for their letter and contribution following the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. Dr. King also mentions the need for all races and ethnicities to work together to achieve the "Brotherhood of Man."

Friday, November 29, 1963

Letter from R. Belui to MLK


R. Belui thanks Dr. King for his courage in the fight for social justice. He also expresses his wishes for Dr. King's to be a presidential candidate.

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Debit Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"


This debit memo from Joan Daves informs Dr. King of the expenses for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Friday, April 7, 1967

Letter from MLK to The People of Japan


Dr. King writes an encouraging letter to the people of Japan expressing his wishes to visit their country sometime soon.

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

Letter from Pastor G. Murray Branch to MLK


In this letter, Pastor Branch invites Dr. King to be the speaker on the 90th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

Request from Wm. James Stuart to MLK


Wm. James Stuart, a student, seeks the recommendation of books that helped Dr. King develop his own way of preaching.

Monday, June 14, 1965

Temple Sholom Bulletin


This issue of the Temple Shalom Bulletin highlights Dr. King and his accomplishments during the Civil Rights Movement.

Saturday, September 19, 1964

Letter from EEOC Commissioner Samuel C. Jackson to MLK


Commissioner Samuel Jackson sends Dr. King a copy of the First Annual Report of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald


Joan Daves informs Miss McDonald that attachments include carbon copies of checks that were "in question."

Monday, July 12, 1965


Dr. King cites a scripture that derives from the Old Testament biblical book of Deuteronomy, stating "the seeing of God's face meant death."

Letter from Ned Griffin to MLK


Ned Griffin, a fourth grade student at Betsy Ross School, acknowledges Dr. King's great contribution to the United States. He explains that his fourth grade class would like an autographed picture of Dr. King for their bulletin at school.

Friday, February 1, 1963

Letter from Dora McDonald to Katherine McBride


Dora McDonald responds to the President of Bryn Mawr College expressing that Dr. King has committed to being the key note speaker for the upcoming graduation. Following the letter is the official commencement invitation.

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

Letter from Sigmund Diamond of Political Science Quarterly to MLK


Sigmund Diamond asks Dr. King if Political Science Quarterly can re-print his review of Ronald Segal's "The Race War: The World-Wide Clash of White and Non-White."

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Letter from Margaret & Richard Dodge to MLK


Margaret and Richard Dodge inform Dr. King of a successful fundraiser they hosted and enclose the profits to help Dr. King in the civil rights movement.

Sunday, March 21, 1965

Letter of Invitation from Jay Goodlette-Bass to Mrs. Corretta Scott King to the Pageantry of the Peace Prize Award


The Fariyah Agency acknowledges Mrs. King commitment to the movement via her commitment to Dr. King. Additionally, the author requests Mrs. King presence to attend the pageantry of the Peace Prize award.

Monday, October 19, 1964

Help For Nigeria


Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.

Saturday, March 25, 1967

Telegram from Dr. Albert Davis to MLK


Dr. Albert Davis and the Atlanta Chapter of the NAACP praise Dr. King for his "continued leadership and revolutionary ideas."

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Holiday Card from the King Family

This is a holiday card from the King Family.

Letter from Nels F. S. Ferre to MLK


Dr. Ferre commends Dr. King on writing "Where Do We Go From Here?" He also expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his position of leadership and for including him in the author's list.

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Letter from Andre Katz to MLK


Andrea Katz, editor of Quadrangle Books, informs Dr. King about a book titled, "Where to, Black Man?" It is a diary of an African American man, Ed Smith, who traveled to Africa to reaffirm his American identity.

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

Schools' Mobile TV Unit Tapes Dr. King's Speech


This news article highlights Darien, Connecticut for the use of their mobile television unit to tape Dr. King's speech. The mobile studio was moved to Stamford High School, where students filmed the speech. Ten other schools in the area were able to see Dr. King speak with the help of this new technology.

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

Letter from Joe Cheru to MLK


Joe Cheru advises Dr. King to adopt a technique called "organized massive write-in." Using this method, he suggested that Dr. King could channel greater support from people who could not participate directly by being physically present for demonstrations.

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today


This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

Saturday, May 1, 1965

Letter from MLK to Reverend George W. Goth


Dr. King writes Reverend George Goth of Metropolitan United Church declining his invitation to make an appearance at his church. Dr. King has engagements for the remainder of the year that hinder him from committing to any further appearances.

Sunday, October 27, 1963

Letter from MLK to Madame Bremond


Dr. King writes Madame Bremond to send his heartfelt thanks regarding his visit to Lyons, France. The Reverend follows with expressing his appreciation for Bremond's hospitality and wonderful reception.

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK


The Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg invites Dr. King to speak at meeting that will be held at the Pennsylvania State Educational Building. Martin Morand, Vice-President of the Council, also includes information about the issues in Harrisburg's black community to show why Dr. King should accept the invitation.

Monday, December 30, 1963