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"Negro Rights: Key Dates"

This image depicts the chronological history of laws passed as it pertains to the life and wellbeing of Negros. The first date of reference is January 1st, 1863, the day when slavery was abolished.

"One Solitary Life"

The document, shown here, contains a narrative describing Jesus, entitled "One Solitary Life." Dr. King would use this narrative, in one of his last and most famous sermons "The Drum Major Instinct." The sermon was delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, February 4, 1968, exactly two months before his untimely assassination.

"Open Hearings Bill Offered in House"

This article addresses political concerns in Jackson, Mississippi, as introduced by John Perkins and Ralph Sowell Jr. The "freedom of information" act will allow the public to be active and aware of political actions. Any violation of this act will result in a penalty for the individual or organization.

"Outrage in Alabama"

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

"Poverty Scene"

This newspaper clipping features a young Jakarta girl, as the face of poverty, in Indonesia.

"Question of Credibility"

In this article, the author highlights and questions the credibility of The Child Development Group, which was created to assist in educating the youth of Mississippi.

"Race Hate and Divisiveness"

This newspaper clipping depicts Dr. King's decision to move the civil rights movement up north as "one of grave peril to everyone concerned." The author believes that the defiance of the law could cause disaster for the Negro cause.

"Rev. King Jumps Back into the Act"

This article expresses how Dr. King wants to take the attention off of the militants and place the focus back on non-violent expression.

"The American Dream"

This transcription of the commencement address delivered by Dr. King at Lincoln University on June 6 1961.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

"University Plans 'Liberties' Program"

Experts at Columbia University plan to adopt a program that will make the meaning of American liberties more relatable to students.

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

"Where Do We Go From Here"-Invoice

This document contains a Harper & Row, Publishers invoice for the sale of four copies of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?"

"Where Do We Go From Here?" Asks Negro King

In this article, Palmer Van Gundy reviews Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." He calls the book a must for all Americans, naming Dr. King not just the greatest civil rights leaders, but also a "leader for peace with freedom and justice."

103:15 General Correspondence 1967 (R)

Mrs. Reich suggests that Dr. King join the "other side" since he feels that the government is on the wrong side.

103:24 General Correspondence 1967 (S)

Addressed to Sigrid L. Sharp, this receipt is forwarded to Minneapolis, MN for a donation of $3.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

104:3 General Correspondence 1967 (T)

Richard Tennent Jr. requests that Dr. King consider applying his efforts of non-violence to Cleveland, Ohio "...to help prevent the violence that seems inevitable." Tennent states that he cannot support the Reverend's stance on the Vietnam War, either financially or intellectually.

10th Anniversary SCLC Convention Program

This document contains a program for the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention hosted by Rev. Howard Creecy, President of the Atlanta Affiliate Chapter of the SCLC. The theme of the convention is "Where Do We Go From Here?"

10th Annual SCLC Convention Program

This document is a flyer for the 10th annual convention of the SCLC.

150 Religious Leaders March on OEO

This press release addresses Sargent Shrivers' decision not to refund the Child Development Group of Mississippi and to express concerns regarding the National War on Poverty.

1922 Work

Dr. King identifies different philosophical points of Alfred North Whitehead's 1922 publication, titled "The Principle of Relativity with Applications to Physical Science."

1963 Income Statement for the SCLC

This document is a financial balance sheet for the SCLC for the fiscal period 9/1/63 to 8/31/64. The statement gives a breakdown of revenues and expenses and lists a net deficit of $50,622.59.

1963 World Day of Prayer

This brochure from the United Church Women of Atlanta, sent to Ms. Coretta Scott King, outlines the agenda for 1965 World Day of Prayer. The brochure allso included is a schedule of the organization's calendar of events.

1964 Election

Dr. King explains "a sizable number of Negro voters" will register for the 1964 presidential election, recognizing the significance of political participation.

1965 Annual Board Meeting for SCLC

This document details the agenda at the Annual Board Meeting for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

1965 Human Rights Day Flyer

This flyer advertises a rally to benefit South African victims of apartheid.

1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award

This program details the events surrounding the Davenport Catholic Interracial Council's 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. Dr. King received the award that year for exemplifying principles of peace and freedom.

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

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