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"Correspondence"

Letter from David Goodwin to MLK

David Goodwin, a child 16 years of age, is outraged by the racial issues in the United States and hopes to be of assistance during the March on Washington despite his young age.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

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Benjamin E. Mays offers celebratory wishes to Dr. King on the sixth anniversary of the Southern Christian Leadership Conferece. Mays offers words of support and encouragement for the great work Dr. King has done in the fight for equality and justice.

Friday, September 21, 1962

Letter from Marian Machesney to MLK

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Marian Machesney writes Dr. King to praise the book "Stride toward Freedom." Machesny also explains the issues of a family where the children are in need of food and education while describing the help he has offered them. Mr. Macheaney expresses his wish to be ordained as a minister by the Western Christian Leadership ministers and states that he is ready to quite entirely if he does not receive the help or advice he has been seeking.

Wednesday, November 22, 1961

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

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Attorney John Bolt Culbertson, a civil rights activist and politician, invites Dr. King to speak at a concert that will benefit the children of Medgar Evers and the families of the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Culbertson explains that the program will feature performances from different choirs. He also mentions that if Dr. King is unable to attend, he would appreciate Dr. King's help securing another prominent speaker.

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Letter from Richard Schweiker to MLK

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Representative Richard Schweiker offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his support for home rule in the District of Columbia. He, however, states that the legislation has been defeated on the floor of Congress. Schweiker urges persistence to see that home rule is established in Washington, D.C.

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Nomination Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. King

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In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays notifies Dr. King that he has nominated him for the Florina Lasker Civil Liberties Award.

Tuesday, September 10, 1963

Letter from President Johnson to Alan Westin

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President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Professor Alan Westin, of Columbia University, to congratulate him on the formation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Monday, February 28, 1966

Plea for the Poor to MLK

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Signing as "A Poor Person," this author urges Dr. King to remember that poverty transcends race. The author requests that Dr. King help the poor of all races, with an emphasis on promoting voter registration for all poor people.

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Strength to Love Royalty Statement

This is a detailed royalty statement from the German language edition of Dr. King's "Strength to Love," published by Christliche Verlag.

Letter from Ann Raynolds to MLK

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Ann Raynolds writes Dr. King informing him of her support for the upcoming Poor People's March to Washington. She also encloses a contribution.

Monday, February 19, 1968

Letter from Roy Pfaff of Promoting Enduring Peace Inc.

Promoting Enduring Peace Inc. invites friends of the organization to participate in one of their 1968 travel seminars. The three tours consist of the Round-The-World Goodwill Seminar, Soviet Union Tour, Around-The World Across Siberia, Mongolia and Japan. The traveling seminars include conferences, interviews, and other cultural educational features. The organization provides the member with possible materials they could order prior to leaving for one of the seminars.

Letter from Thelma Berlack Boozer to MLK

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Thelma Berlack Boozer, President of Gothamettes, Inc. writes Dr. King sending a contribution of $150. In closing, Boozer requests a receipt or prompt acknowledgement of the contribution.

Sunday, May 29, 1966

Letter from W. Russell Chapman to MLK

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The York County, Pennsylvania branch of the NAACP sends a second invitation to Dr. King to be a guest speaker.

Monday, January 22, 1962

Letter to Mr. Otwell from Dr. King Regarding the Request for an Article for the Chicago Sun-Times

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Dr. King informs Mr. Otwell that, due to prior obligations, he will not be able to write the article for the Sunday edition as requested. However, he assures Mr. Otwell that he will look into the possibility of editing a section of "Why We Can't Wait" to be published instead.

Monday, March 30, 1964

Letter from O. O. Rabb to MLK

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This note and newspaper clipping from O.O. Robb was addressed to "The Right Reverend Martin Luther King, Pastor & Civil Rights Agitator." Robb assures Dr. King that he would, in fact, find supporters, "for there are many soft-headed wild-eyed people who have a soft heart and no brains who will follow." Robb contines that President Johnson's Great Society and War on Poverty must go on and ends that Dr. King and his supporters will get their reward - a prison cell.

Monday, March 27, 1967

Letter from Edwina C. Johnson to MLK

Edwina C. Johnson claims that the racial problems in the United States are the result of "what is recorded as 'The American Heritage'" and its debasement of African Americans in media, particularly textbooks. Johnson suggests emphasizing the role that African Americans have played in American history. Johnson also provides a list of freedoms that should not be denied to African Americans.

Letter from MLK to South African Embassy

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Having been invited to South Africa by the National Union of South African Students and the Students' Visiting Lecturers Organization of the University of Cape Town, Dr. King writes the South African Embassy initiating the process of apply for a visa.

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

Letter from John E. Farrow to MLK

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John Farrow writes Dr. King to suggest he tread softly as he continues the fight for social justice. Farrow states that whites will fight back with brute force against desegregation and civil rights for all. Farrow urges Dr. King to offer knowledge but not seek to antagonize whites during the March on Washington and his future efforts for the civil rights movement.

Monday, November 18, 1963

Letter from Jo Ellen Braveman to MLK

Jo Ellen Braveman, Secretary of the Human Relations Club of Julia Richman High School, presents Dr. King with the Julia Richman Brotherhood Award. Braveman says, "You truly deserve this award because of your dedicated outstanding work in Human Relations."

Letter from Louise Andrews Sims to MLK

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Louise Andrews Sims asks Dr. King to consider providing assistance to the American Friend's Service Committee by setting aside one week for aspeaking engagement in October or November of 1963. Alternate dates could be in January through April of 1964.

Thursday, October 18, 1962

Letter from Harry Denman to MLK

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Mr.Denman writes Dr. King to share words of support and encouragement as Dr. King prepares to turn himself over to the Birmingham officials. Denman suggests that Dr.King should turn this event into a major demonstration.

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to Mr. Alan F. Westin

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Vice President Hubert Humphrey congratulates Professor Alan Westin for the creation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Monday, March 21, 1966

Letter to MLK from Alan Westin

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Alan F. Westin invites Dr. King to serve on the Board of Governors of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties of Columbia Univeristy and Teachers College. Westin describes the mission of the Center and asks Dr. King to join in their efforts of developing civil rights teaching techniques to be used in all levels of public education.

Friday, April 8, 1966

Letter from Charles E. Blackburn to MLK

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Charles Blackburn shares with Dr. King a mutual passion for change. Blackburn expresses that his concern is not with the "American Negroe's revolt against hypocrisy," but with the hypocrisy as it applies to the young white generation.

Monday, February 12, 1968

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

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Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Monday, May 29, 1967

Letter from Robert Nelson to MLK

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Robert R. Nelson notifies Dr. King of the recent invitation that was first extended by Mr. Wendell English on behalf of the Impact Committee at Marshall University. Mr. Nelson requests Dr. King to participate as a key note speaker at one of the events. Impact is a morality driven organization focused on the proper guidance and purpose of life.

Monday, October 18, 1965

Letter from Richard K. Goidel

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Mr. Goidel, a student editor, requests a photograph from Dr. King to be featuredd in an article referencing the recent Time Magazine's Choice "68. Dr. King was nominated as a candidate for by Time magazine's Choice '68 collegiate Presidency. Sadly, Dr. King was assassinated two weeks later.

Friday, March 15, 1968

Letter from MLK to S. Dillon Ripley at the Smithsonian Institute

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Dr. King informs S. Dillon Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, that he is unable to attend the bicentennial celebration of the birth of James Smithson.

Friday, May 21, 1965

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

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In this letter Joan Daves informs Ms. Dora McDonald that all matters pertaining to the published works of Dr. King must pass through her office, as she is the literary agent for Dr. King.

Friday, May 1, 1964

Letter about Publication with Reprint of MLK's Remarks

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In this letter, Paul Kurtz, the editor of the Humanist, asks Dr. King to look over and comment on the enclosed copy of his piece that will be printed in Humanist.

Thursday, December 28, 1967

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