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"Speeches"

Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

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This version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech is typed in all capitals, probably to make it easier to read from while delivering the speech.

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Statement by MLK in San Francisco

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Dr. King gives an address in San Francisco regarding race relations, equality, and segregation. Dr. King charges people from all communities to unite so that hope can be created for others.

Tuesday, May 26, 1964

The American Dream

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This document contains the text of an address that Dr. King gave at Plymouth Church of The Pilgrims in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King describes the steps that should be taken in order to make the American Dream a reality.

Sunday, February 10, 1963

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

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Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union

In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

Statement by MLK

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In this statement, Dr. King enforces the mission and organizational structure of the SCLC as a means of denouncing the traditional ideas associated with the "Black Power" slogan.

Friday, October 14, 1966

MLK Remarks at the NAACP's Civil Rights Rally

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Dr. King addresses the NAACP in regards to the equality of the school systems for Negro students. He urges the crowd to "employ only the highest weapons of dignity and discipline" while continuing to fight against segregation.

Sunday, July 10, 1960

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

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Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Monday, December 3, 1956

MLK - Justice Without Violence

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Dr. King gave this 1957 address to the Institute of Adult Education at Brandeis University in Boston, Massachusetts.

Wednesday, April 3, 1957

Statement on SCLC Commitment to Albany, Georgia

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Dr. King announces that he is organizing an operation in Albany, Georgia in which the members of the SCLC will be present and active.

Thursday, July 12, 1962

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

Birmingham Desegregation Settlement Agreement

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Dr. King reviews the settlement made between the City of Birmingham and civil rights protesters. This agreement includes the integration of lunch counters, sitting rooms, restrooms, and water fountains within ninety days.

Friday, May 10, 1963

MLK Annual Report at the 1964 SCLC Convention

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

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James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

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In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.

Sunday, September 25, 1960

Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

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Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."

Friday, December 2, 1966

Draft of MLK's Public Statement Concerning SCLC Supporting Communism

Dr. King addresses the accusation in the New York Herald Tribune that some SCLC members support Communism. He also states that the SCLC has severed ties with former member Jack O'Dell, including the fundraising that had taken place in New York.

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

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Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.

Wednesday, September 12, 1962

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

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Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Statement to SCLC Board About Alabama Boycotts

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In this statement, Dr. King explains the need for a boycott of the state of Alabama because of extreme violence and police overreaction, which he calls "totalitarian."

Friday, April 2, 1965

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

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The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Friday, May 20, 1966

Movement for Puerto Rican Independence

Pedro Juan Rua, a leader in the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, gives a speech concerning the American military presence in Vietnam. He provides a historical framework for understanding America's involvement with other oppressed nations, asserting "U.S. rulers are new Nazis. Unite to defeat them."

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

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Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Discrimination Is a World Wide Issue

Dr. King delivers this address speaking to humanity's failure to offset discrimination. He believes the United States, with all its technological and democratic advances, could stand to learn from the social morality of India, which is considered a "less developed nation." Dr.

MLK's Statement on Current Electoral Politics

This is the draft of a statement that Dr. King planned to make, concerning the state of politics in America. Dr. King expresses his disappointment in that "the quality of some of the men elected makes a mockery of responsible government," and urges African-Americans to "lose faith in a shallow 'good will' that provides nothing."

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

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Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Monday, October 30, 1967

Who They are and Why They Struck

This article stresses the unfair treatment of twenty-two Claussen Bakery workers. This article also addresses why the workers went on strike.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Court Hearings

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Dr. King compares past discrimination to recent strides that have been made in the American justice system.

Friday, December 3, 1965

Address for the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights

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This address was delivered by Dr. King at the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights event on May 17, 1962. Dr. King opens by discussing various anniversaries that coincide with the event and represent similar struggles for justice including the Supreme Court school desegregation ruling, the Emancipation Proclamation, and Henry David Thoreau's death.

Thursday, May 17, 1962

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