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"Tennessee (TN)"

Map of Morehouse College

These maps are an overview of the buildings located at Morehouse College.

Calvinism

Dr. King writes on the concept of Calvinism.

Letter from Ned Griffin to MLK

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Ned Griffin, a fourth grade student at Betsy Ross School, acknowledges Dr. King's great contribution to the United States. He explains that his fourth grade class would like an autographed picture of Dr. King for their bulletin at school.

Friday, February 1, 1963

Contribution Letter from Dr. and Mrs. Bacon to Dr. King

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Dr. and Mrs. Bacon are writing to express their support and concern for the "last chance" SCLC project. Enclosed in the letter is $200 contribution to help further support the initiative.

Friday, February 23, 1968

Social Ethics in Psalms

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in Psalms 72.

Shriver Outlines Summer Program

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This New York Times article reports that if Congress approves the $75 million supplemental appropriation for antipoverty programs, Sargent Shriver, director of the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, plans to use $47 million for the Neighborhood Youth Corps and $25 for community action agencies to help provide youth with employment and recreation. It also mentions efforts in the Senate to increase the supplemental appropriation.

Saturday, March 4, 1967

Letter from John A. Clark to MLK Regarding Scriptures, Spiritual Advice and Prayer

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In this letter, Reverend John A. Clark provides spiritual advice, scripture and prayer for Dr. King during hard times as well as for preparation of the future. Reverend John A. Clark also mentions starting a revival and revisiting Washington to D.C. to preach for a cause.

Friday, June 9, 1967

Letter from Kerstin Lindblom to the SCLC

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A Student from Sweden offers to come to America to work for the SCLC. Her letter describes all the ways she wishes to help.

Thursday, September 8, 1966

Letter from Maria A. Mochulski to MLK

Duquesne University requests that Dr. King provide information for the candidate he is supporting for the presidential elections of 1968. The universities Choice '68 committee is interested in having Dr. King speak to the student body.

Peace and Freedom Party

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The Peace and Freedom Party was originally established in the Northern region of California in 1967. This pamphlet features the party's political platform in addition to voter registration procedures.

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Letter from David Sutton to MLK

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The associate director of Alumni Relations at Drexel Institute of Technology invites Dr. King to speak at the newly formed Downtown Luncheon Club. Mr. Sutton mentions that the alumni of Drexel revere Dr. King's philosophy and principles of nonviolence. He also informs Dr. King about the confirmed attendance of Pulitzer Prize winner James Michener.

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

Letter from Charles L. Allen Sr. to MLK

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After listening to an address by Dr. King, Charles L. Allen, Sr. extends his support and requests information on where to send a financial contribution.

Sunday, February 18, 1968

Letter from Dr. Lionel Newsom to Georgia Council on Human Relations Members

In the aftermath of the failure in attacking segregation in Albany, Georgia, the Chairman of the Georgia Council on Human Relations issues an appeal to its members to help support their continued fight. Dr. Lionel outlines the organization's past accomplishments and encourages members to learn from their mistakes in Albany to yield better results in the future.

MLK Draft on Jackie Robinson and Hall of Fame

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Dr. King highlights the achievements of Jackie Robinson in this article about Robinson's induction into baseball's Hall of Fame. Dr. King applauds Robinson for using his celebrity status for the Civil Rights Movement.

Wednesday, July 25, 1962

MLK Address - The Association of The Bar of the City of New York

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Dr. King gives an address to the Association of The Bar of the City of New York at the Hilton Hotel in New York. He praises lawyers for using their knowledge to aid the Civil Rights Movement. He states that Negro lawyers bring wisdom and a determination to win to the courtroom. Dr. King also defines an unjust law as a law that is "out of harmony with moral law of the universe."

Wednesday, April 21, 1965

Letter from Eva Rosenfeld to MLK

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Eva Rosenfeld writes Dr. King expressing her support of his stance on the Vietnam War, regardless of critics like the NAACP. She asserts that King's mentality is wise and "that hope for all of us lies in seeing these issues as one issue, an issue of our humanity."

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Letter from Senator Hugh Scott to MLK

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US Senator Hugh Scott, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for the Reverend's letter of recent date. In addition, Scott reveals that he sponsored the Civil Rights legislation long before the present act was introduced. Scott also expresses that he would enjoy speaking with Dr. King during his next visit in Washington, D. C.

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Letter from Charles S. Joelson to MLK

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Congressman Joelson of New Jersey responds to Dr. King's recent letter urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. He informs Dr. King that he shares his view and was one of the 148 members who voted against it.

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Letter from Anna Cohen to MLK

Anna Cohen inquires to Dr. King about the involvement of the Jewish community in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Georges Cravenne

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Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Cravenne for inviting him to the Palais des Sports. He also thanks Cravenne for supporting the struggle in equal human rights.

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Letter from Mike Van Ryan to Reverend Ralph Abernathy

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Mike Van Ryn addresses this correspondence to Rev. Ralph Abernathy with an enclosure of $20 for the work of SCLC.

Monday, April 8, 1968

Royalty Summary for MLK from J. Campe

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This royalty statement, from J.Campe, details Dr. King's sales and earnings from the French edition of "The Strength to Love", during the given time period.

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

Telegram from President Kennedy to MLK

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President Kennedy compliments Dr. King and his organization for their persistent push for equal rights in America.

Monday, September 24, 1962

Love

Dr. King writes on the Apostle Paul’s concept of love.

Letter from Eleanor Bell Barnard to MLK

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Eleanor Bell Barnard expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's position on Vietnam and Civil Rights. Ms. Barnard also describes to Dr. King how his work is motivation to those who are unemployed.

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Letter from H.M. Arrowsmith to MLK

General Secretary of the British and Foreign Bible Society in Australia, Canon H. M. Arrowsmith, M.B.E., extends Dr. King an official invitation to visit Australia in May 1967. It is the Society's hope that Dr. King's trip will focus primarily on the role of the Bible in relation to the "stature and the status of Man" and the "question of racial equality" throughout the world.

Letter from Dan H. Elkind to MLK

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Mr. Elkind discusses recent actions of the SNCC and the SCLC's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign. He believes that the actions made by the SNCC will lead to violence and also "alienate" supporters of civil rights legislation. He views Dr. King's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign to be unlawful, and therefore suggests a different approach for Dr. King to take.

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

Letter from L. Martinez to MLK

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Mrs. L. Martinez describes to Dr. King what she has observed about the Lawndale area in Chicago, Illinois. She suggests that instead of relocating to other neighborhoods, the tenants of Lawndale initiate a clean up of the area themselves.

Thursday, March 31, 1966

God

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's statement that there is no "medium point" as it relates to God.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

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