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"Tennessee (TN)"

"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

"The American Dream"

This transcription of the commencement address delivered by Dr. King at Lincoln University on June 6 1961.

A First Step Toward School Integration

This article on the first steps toward school integration includes a foreword by Dr. King. The article goes into some detail about the events regarding the integration of schools in Nashville, Tennessee.

A Look To The Future

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

A Look to the Future

Dr. King addresses the Highlander Folk School during the organization's twenty-fifth anniversary. He discusses the many accomplishments and hurdles of the Civil Rights Movement.

A New South A-Coming

This pamphlet discusses the courageous stand of African American high school students against racial discrimination in the South. The efforts demonstrated by these young people to bring about change of many undemocratic practices were significantly noted in Negro history.

A Union Treasurer Writes MLK Regarding the SCLC Convention

Cleveland Robinson, Secretary Treasurer of AFL-CIO District 65 Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, writes to Dr. King with several suggestions for the upcoming SCLC convention.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Adverse Postcard to MLK

American Opinion illustrates a propaganda postcard of Dr. King that accuses him of being a communist. The photo on the postcard was taken at the Highlander School in 1957 which trained leaders in nonviolent passive resistance.

Advice for Living

Advice for Living is a column Dr. King uses to help people with moral dilemmas. In this issue, he receives questions from an 18-year old about his mother's drinking issues, a 24-year old with relationship issues, and others.

Agenda of the General Committee of the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations

This document is an agenda and lists meeting minutes regarding the approval of actions, nominations, budget, and miscellaneous items for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations.

American Foundation on Nonviolence Board Meeting

Harry W. Wachtel reports the minutes of the American Foundation of Nonviolence Board Meeting held in New York City, New York.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

An Analysis of the Ethical Demands of Integration

Dr. King argues that desegregation is only the first step towards the ultimate goal of complete racial equality. He explains that nonviolence, driven by the power of love, is crucial to create true integration.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Anonymous Adverse Letter

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.

Anonymous letter to MLK

An anonymous individual expresses their concern with the methods and efforts Dr. King is using to achieve his goals through the Civil Rights Movement.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An unknown author questions Dr. King about his leadership and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. He references various racial, political, and social events, and stresses that Dr. King is responsible for all the riots, violence and looting.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

Postcard has a photo entitled "Training Schools for Communists". American Opinion claims the photo was taken at the Highlander Folk School over Labor Day weekend 1957. Dr. King is depicted as one the attendees. Postcard was stamped with an Abraham Lincoln postage stamp (One of the guiding forces to Dr. King and his efforts)

Anticipated Public School Desegregation in Southern and Border States

This memorandum provides a list of schools and school systems expected to desegregate in September of 1957. The Southern Regional Council, Inc. also includes vital information concerning pending Negro applications for school admittance and schools actively involved in litigation.

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

Bayard Rustin: Right to Work Laws

This booklet, written chiefly by Bayard Rustin, suggests that the "Right to Work" laws handicap minorities in the American workforce. The "Right to Work" law is a statute that bans union security agreements, which Rustin posits is undemocratic and assists in exploiting and perpetuating American poverty.

Biographical Sketch of James Bevel

This one page biography summarizes the achievements of James Bevel, one of the founding members of SNCC. The biography highlights Bevel's involvement with civil rights drives in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, including the Freedom Rides and numerous SCLC action programs.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

By-Laws of the SCLC

This document outlines the by-laws of the SCLC, which includes the organization's purpose, duties and responsibilities of members, and procedures governing officers and committees. The purpose of the SCLC is to "organize and maintain Christian guidance" to aid in improving cultural conditions.

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

CEP News

The Citizenship Education Program of the SCLC, in cooperation with the American Missionary Association issue this periodic publication that includes updates of the organization's progress, current events and other news of interest.

Chicago Nonviolent Action Proposal

SCLC's proposal for a nonviolent action campaign in Chicago identifies the city as the prototype for the northern urban race problem. The proposal includes a snapshot of the situation in Chicago, past approaches, SCLC?s philosophy of social change, a description of twelve different aspects of the problem of economic exploitation, and a plan and timetable for mobilizing forces. Objectives are stated for the federal, state, and local levels. SCLC proposes to work in collaboration with the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations.

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