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Letter from Morton S. Grossman to MLK

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In this correspondence, Morton S. Grossman, expressed his joy, over Dr. King's New Year's card, and enclosed a check, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In addition, Mr. Grossman requested a note, signed by Dr. King, to add to his autograph collection.

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Letter to Dr. King

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The author of this letter writes to oppose Dr. King's view of the government being the greatest infuser of violence. The author attributes Communism as the root of violence, and asks Dr. King to consider the consequences of unfavorable criticism during such times.

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Letter from MLK to May Edward Chinn

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Dr. King responds to Dr. May Chinn's letter of support and encouragement. King states, "Our struggle for freedom is often difficult and the moments are often frustrating, but we gain new courage to carry on..."

Monday, December 23, 1963

SNCC - SCLC Alabama Staff Meeting

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Randolph Blackwell updates Andrew Young of the recent SCLC and SNCC joint meeting intended to resolve any conflicts between the two organizations and their initiatives within the state of Alabama. The mounting tension between the two civil rights organizations is attributed to the rise of Black Panther Party chapters throughout the South, a phenomenon from which SCLC intends to distance itself.

Friday, January 28, 1966

MLK Remarks at the Launching of SCLC's Crusade for Citizenship

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Dr. King delivered this speech at a launch meeting for the Crusade for Citizenship in Miami, Florida. He discusses the denial of African Americans' right to vote by relating it to other former disfranchised Americans such as those who did not own property and women. Dr. King discusses the hypocrisy in some American officials' advocacy of democratic election in other European countries as well as the social and economic welfare of all Americans.

Wednesday, February 12, 1958

Letter from William R. Rice to MLK

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William Rice, editorial director for WLS radio in Chicago, offers Dr. King suggestions for Operation Dropout. Also enclosed in the letter is a statement on the reasons to stay in school.

Thursday, October 20, 1966

Knowledge

Dr. King outlines epistemological claims that deal with the "universals" and the "particulars" of knowledge. In doing so, he references the philosophical views of Socrates and St. Thomas Aquinas.

Letter from Arthur James to MLK

Arthur James, a member of the Movement for the Advancement of Black Brotherhood and Culture, invites Dr. King to speak at Lincoln University.

Letter from Paul R. Trumpler to MLK

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Paul Trumpler writes Dr. King expressing how he and his wife are pleased to have the chance to support Dr. King's work. They believe in Dr. King's ideas regarding racial issues and solutions. Trumpler encloses a check written out to Dr. King so he can use the money as he designate.

Friday, May 25, 1962

MLK/SCLC Fundraising Letter and Response

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Bruce and Gertrude joins send their support and contribution on the back of the SCLC fundraising letter they received. They refer to the "old sociological truth that one cannot keep a person in the gutter without needing to stay in there himself to keep the other down there," and thank Dr. King for leadership that liberates both Negro and White.

Wednesday, December 27, 1961

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

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Attorney John Bolt Culbertson, a civil rights activist and politician, invites Dr. King to speak at a concert that will benefit the children of Medgar Evers and the families of the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Culbertson explains that the program will feature performances from different choirs. He also mentions that if Dr. King is unable to attend, he would appreciate Dr. King's help securing another prominent speaker.

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Letter from Harris Schultz to MLK

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Harris Schultz questions the decision to impose an economic boycott in Alabama. He lists several reasons not to boycott, including the voting rights bill currently under consideration in Congress, the bombing of a Negro citizen's home in Birmingham and the apathy of some people in Alabama.

Saturday, April 3, 1965

Breadbasket and National Tea Agree

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Operation Breadbasket teams up with the National Tea Company to improve employment and business opportunities for Negroes.

Monday, December 12, 1966

People to People: Something Happening in Mississippi

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In this article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, a group of Negroes from Mississippi who displayed the power of nonviolence by challenging the seating of the state's all-white regular Democratic delegation at the 1964 Democratic Convention.

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Thank you Letter from MLK

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Thank you Letter from MLK to Dr. Jones at Morehouse College for an autographed copy of "A Candle In The Dark"

Friday, January 26, 1968

Telegram from MLK to Berry Gordy

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Dr. King congratulates Berry Gordy, Jr. for being awarded the Business Achievement Award from the Interracial Council for Business Opportunity.

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Letter from James P. Dixon to MLK Requesting a Donation

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In this letter, Mr. Dixon discusses his early life, his journey to Antioch College, and requests help from Dr. King in funding the same program that put Dixon through college.

Monday, November 20, 1967

"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

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In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

Saturday, July 13, 1963

Letter from William S. Stein to MLK

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William Stein informs Dr. King that the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church will be contributing to SCLC.

Friday, May 6, 1966

Letter from Martin Sizemoreto to Gentlemen

Martin Sizemore explains that the Madison Senior High School's Speech Department is researching a topic for their debate team and is in request for any literature that could contribute to their research.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Erik Ruden

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Dora McDonald informs Erik Ruden that Dr. King will only be able to speak twice during his upcoming trip to London and that an associate will need to travel with Dr. King.

Tuesday, March 17, 1964

Letter from the National Committee To Combat Nazism to MLK

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Rabbi S. Burr Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, sends Dr. King a resolution on civil rights that was passed at their fourth annual conference in Chicago. The resolution formally announces the organization's support of the Civil Rights Movement.

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Goldwater's Nomination

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Dr. King expresses his disdain for Republican presidential candidate Senator Barry Goldwater. Dr. King believes that Senator Goldwater is not an adequate candidate, due to his lack of knowledge in foreign policy and philosophies about equality for all.

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

Letter from William Johnston to MLK

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William Johnston of the Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa, writes Wyatt Tee Walker to inform him of an upcoming trip being made by Reverend Alphaeus H. Zulu in Atlanta. Johnston asks that the Reverend reserve a time to meet with Bishop Zulu during his short stay in the city.

Monday, September 9, 1963

Civil Rights and Vietnam

An avid supporter urges Dr. King to divert his attention to the War in Vietnam. He asserts "This war will force Chinese and Russian to interfere and may further expand into thermonuclear war..."

Letter from C. L. Swartzentruber to MLK

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School Superintendent C. L. Swartzentruber invites Dr. King to speak at Central Christian High School for their Fourth Annual Lecture-Music Series. He also congratulates Dr. King on being "Time's Man of the Year" and states that, as Mennonites, they are particularly interested in his nonviolent strategy.

Monday, February 3, 1964

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Charles Ocasio

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This letter from a middle school student in New York City is a letter of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Friday, April 5, 1968

Folder

The folder, shown here, contained a sermon of Dr. King entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians." This address was one of Dr. King's well-known sermons.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

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In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King, along with others, that the Detroit News will run installments for "Why We Cant Wait." They are also told that the copyright will be in Dr. King's name and that credit will be given to Harper and NAL.

Thursday, May 28, 1964

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

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