Themes

The Archive

Search results for:
"Ohio (OH)"

"God's Judgment on Western Civilization"

The document contains notes for a sermon given by Dr. King entitled, "God's Judgement on Western Civilization."

Quotes on Love

The document, seen here, displays special quotations that focus on the theme of "love." Prominent individuals and philosophers such as: Carlyle, Suard, the Pope and Washington Irving are just a few of the quotes chosen by Dr. King.

Amsterdam Article

This document describes the fight for civil rights in Mississippi in the early 1960's.

Letter From PFC Harold Mac Kenzie To MLK

,

In this letter to Dr. King, serviceman Harold Mac Kenzie explains how he is interested in the welfare of Black people and would like to know how he can contribute to the movement.

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Letter from Thomas H. Rogers to MLK

,

On Race Relations Sunday, Thomas H. Rogers writes this letter to express his brotherhood and prayers for Dr. King. Emphasizing that one live a life acceptable to God, Rogers believes that God, not man, makes the only judgement. Though of a different race than Dr. King, Rogers sees Dr. King as his brother in Christ and encourages him to do God's biding.

Saturday, February 11, 1967

Letter from John H. Scott to MLK

John H. Scott writes Dr. King regarding his planned trip to the Holy Land. Scott expresses his admiration for Dr. King and seeks to join the tour.

The Martin Luther King Column (1)

Dr. King discusses the accomplishments of the Montgomery bus boycott, the challenges Negros will face, and the leadership skills of Ralph Abernathy.

Letter from Theodore R. Britton Jr. to MLK

,

Theodore R. Britton promotes the candidacy of Dr. King for the pastorship of Riverside Church throughout this letter. Britton also asserts that New York is in need of Dr. King's leadership and sermons.

Saturday, February 24, 1968

MLK Statement to Time Magazine

,

In this statement to Time Magazine, Dr. King responds to President John F. Kennedy's call for new civil rights legislation.

Friday, January 12, 1962

Telegram from Roselle Siegal to MLK

,

Roselle Siegal extends her appreciation and moral support of Dr. King by means of this Western Union telegram.

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Proposed Nobel Speech

This is a draft for an optional version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. He notes the importance of viewing the world as a family and with such perception, understands race issues as an international concern. King also speaks of Sir Alfred Bernhard Nobel, the originator of the Nobel Peace Prize. He accepts the award on behalf of those who came before him and those who continue to fight for freedom.

Letter from Ed Jennings to MLK Regarding the Vietnam War

In this letter received February 7, 1966, Jennings enlightens King on the pro-war and anti-war activities taking place at the University of Illinois, Chicago. Jennings is a representative of the Students for a Democratic Society(SDS). Jennings is requesting that Dr. King reply with a short message which the SDS can use during their anti-war activities.

Telegram from Margaret Saunders to MLK

,

Margaret Saunders sends a telegram to encourage Dr. King while he is in jail.

Friday, October 21, 1960

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Report

This report details a statistical count of Jewish communities being discriminated against according to a market research that was conducted by the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Letter from J.W. Augustus to Ralph Abernathy

,

The Ad Hoc Committee for Good Government of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, issued this letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy requesting his assistance. Director of Political Action for the committee, J. W. Augustus, informed Rev. Abernathy of attempts by white city parish commissioners to buy the votes belonging to Negro political organizations.

Monday, April 29, 1968

Birmingham Jail

,

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.

Tuesday, December 7, 1965

Letter from Dr. Earl C. Jackson, Sr. to MLK

,

Earl Jackson writes Dr. King requesting feedback regarding his upcoming speaking engagement as one of three keynote speakers during a large conference in Delaware.

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

CEP News

,

The Citizenship Education Program of the SCLC, in cooperation with the American Missionary Association issue this periodic publication that includes updates of the organization's progress, current events and other news of interest.

Wednesday, September 1, 1965

Anonymous Adverse Letter

,

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

,

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

Peace and Freedom Party Registration Drive

This document discusses the Peace and Freedom Party Registration Drive and the California Committee for the Peace and Freedom Party. The registration drive aims to place the Peace and Freedom Party on the 1968 California ballot with the purpose of opposing the Democratic and Republican presidential candidates. Also included is a partial list of the Peace and Freedom Party's endorsers, which includes 1962 Nobel Peace Prize recipient Linus Pauling.

Original Sin

From "The Epistle of the Romans," Dr. King records Karl Barth's observations regarding original sin, which are compared to views of the Bible, Saint Augustine and the Reformers.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Cornell E. Talley

,

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Reverend Cornell E. Talley for the contribution from New Light Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. King expresses an interest in speaking at a mid week prayer service at New Light Baptist Church.

Wednesday, April 25, 1962

Letter from Usher Board of Saint Luke Community Church to MLK

,

The Usher Board of the Saint Luke Community Christian Church invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker at their church.

Thursday, December 24, 1964

Letter from Irwin Heilner to Attorney Clarence Jones

,

Irwin Heilner asks Dr. King's attorney for permission to use the "I Have a Dream" speech in one of his songs. He mentions that he previously used words from Langston Hughes in a song on a 50 percent basis and would like the same agreement for the use of Dr. King's speech.

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Harry Crosby to MLK

,

The Crosby family of Massachusetts encloses a check to Dr. King to aid in the fight for equality. Mrs. Crosby notes that her husband was the first individual to employ a Negro teacher at Boston University, where Dr. King received his PhD in systematic theology.

Sunday, March 8, 1964

Man

Dr. King references two quotations on a note card titled "Man."

Letter from Mr. Harry W. Allison, Ph.D. to MLK

,

Mr. Allison, a white clinical psychologist, expresses his support of Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Reservation Request Letter from Morehouse

,

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, President of Morehouse College, writes Dr. King to inform him of the school's upcoming "Centennial activities." Hoping both he and Mrs. King will attend, he kindly urges Dr. King to RSVP immediately for the event on Friday evening. The writing on the letter indicates that Dr. Mays' request was answered via telephone.

Monday, February 13, 1967

Pages