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A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Asheville, North Carolina

This is the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon before the sixty-sixth annual convention of the General Federation of Women's Club. He discusses the differences in countries dealing with Communism and America being a democracy.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Current Magazine

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Dr. Spock Joins King in March

Pediatrician and anti-war activist Dr. Benjamin Spock and Dr. King lead thousands of individuals throughout the streets of Chicago in objection to the Vietnam War. Both Dr. King and Dr. Spock express their dissatisfaction with President Johnson's focus on Vietnam rather than the war on poverty.

Howard University Charter Day Observance

Howard University celebrates its' Charter Day Observance with a program that includes a speech by Dr. King. The program also acknowledges the recipients of the Alumni Achievement Award. Such individuals include Ossie Davis and Leroy F. Florant.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from Charles Szolyvai to MLK

Charles Szolyvai writes Dr. King requesting a meeting in an "effort to help you in your great fight for justice for all." Dr. King handwrites a response at the corner of the document stating his uncertainty of when he will be in New York.

Letter from Ivor Liss to MLK

Ivor M. Liss writes Dr. King and explains his support for the movement that Dr. King is leading. He talks about how being silent would actually hurt Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement. Liss explains that as a Jew he understands the fight for equality as it is something that Jewish people are still fighting for. He encloses a check for $100.00.

Letter from Joan Sinkler to MLK

Joan Sinkler writes Dr. King expressing that she is disappointed with him for not mentioning "the racist and colonialist character" of the Vietnam War. Sinkler asserts that the US did not go to war to protect Hungary, Cuba or Tibet.

Letter from MLK to Takarekpenztar

Dr. King offers his gratitude to the workers of the Country Savings Bank XIII in Budapest for naming their socialist labor brigade after Dr. King. Unable to understand any of the names from the initial letter, Dr. King addresses this letter to "Takarekpenztar" or "savings bank" in Hungarian.

Letter from Moisa Bulboaca to MLK

Moisa Bulboaca thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence in which Dr. King expressed his interest in visiting and preaching in Romania. In the event Dr. King actually formulates a trip, Bulboaca suggests accompanying if possible. The author explains their background in "sacred music" and provides a brief biography for consideration. They offer to organize a musical selection to fit Dr. King's sermons.

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

The Influence of the Right and Left in the Civil Rights Movement

Activist Bayard Rustin prepared these remarks for the Negro Leadership Conference in New York in January 1965. He discusses the influence of the American right, the traditional Communist left and the unaffiliated left (the Thirties veterans and the spontaneous left of Harlem and Mississippi).

The Wells Newsletter: January 1964

This publication, to which Dr. King subscribed, discusses global issues such as Russian Communism, Marxism, the status of the United States economy, and Negroes in college.

To the Negroes of America

Robert Welch compares the American Negro Population to Negro populations around the world in regards to ownership of various consumer items. He asserts that Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther are shameless liars working in league with communists.

Transcript of National Educational Television's For Freedom Now

For Freedom Now, with host Dr. Kenneth Clark, is television’s first exchange of ideas by the leaders of five organizations engaged in securing full civil rights for Negroes. Featured guests are Dr. King of SCLC, Whitney Young of the National Urban League, James Farmer of CORE, James Forman of SNCC, and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP.

True Democracy

Reverend O. J. P. Wetklo explains his ideas of true democracy, which he gives a Christian foundation and compares to the natural world. He calls true democracy "a perfect brotherhood of man," and he argues that each individual member of society must take responsibility for the whole.